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Full text of "Annual reports"

1986 



MEDFIELD 




.■■/'■ : 




336th Annual Report of the Town Officers 



Our cover Is a photograph of a painting by a former Selectman 
Walter Frank, circa turn of century, Medfield Square. 



336th Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1986 



IN MEMORIAM 



BEATRICE BANGS 
Registrar 1965 - 1985 

JOHN BRADSTREET 

Finance Committee 1954 - 1961 

Planning Board 1964 - 1968 

Conservation Commission 1980 - 1985 

CHARLES CHEEVER 
Finance Committee 1958 - 1959 

ANNIE DOYLE 
Council on Aging 1971 - 1975 

BARBARA FRIEND 
Assistant Librarian 1973 - 1980 

EDITH HOWLETT 

School Committee 1943 - 1949 

Library Trustee 1939 - 1941 1960 - 1962 

Librarian 1947 - 1952 

RUTH JACKSON 
V.N. A. Administrator 1968 - 1980 

RICHARD KAEWER 
Master Plan Implementation Committee 1967 - 1972 

JOHN W. KELLAR 
School Planning and Building Committee 1964 - 1968 

MELVILLE J. MILLS 
Assessor 1965 - 1986 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



4 

http://archive.org/details/annualreports1986medf 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Population as of January 1, 1986 
Assessed Valuation 1986 
Tax Rate 



7/1/85 - 12/31/85 
1/1/86 - 6/30/86 



10,632 

$492,580,351 

14.60 
14.85 



Area 14.43 Square Miles 

Miles of Highway 69.37 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above mean sea level. 
Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 



10th District 

Representative to Congress 



2nd District 

Governor's Councillor 



Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex District 
State Senator 



8th Middlesex District 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
United States Senators 



Barney Frank 

114 Floral Street 

Newton, MA 02158 



Robert F. X. Casey 
11 Pacella Drive 
Dedham, MA 02026 



David H. Locke 
15 Ordway Road 
Wellesley Hills, MA 02181 

Barbara Gardner 
114 Jennings Road 
Holliston, MA 01746 



Edward M. Kennedy 
J.F.K. Memorial Building 
Boston, MA 02203 

John Kerry 

J.F.K. Memorial Building 

Boston, MA 02203 



Number of Registered Voters as of December 31, 1986: 



Democrats 1257 
Republicans 1349 
Independents 3456 



TOTAL 



6062 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OFFICERS 



MODERATOR 



Ralph C. Copeland 



Nancy J. Preston 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 



Nancy J. Preston 



Robert J. Larkin 
William F. Nourse 
Ann B. Thompson 



Melville J. Mills, deceased 
Carole A. Rossi* 
William D. Walsh 
Susan N. Thornton 



Robert A. Kinsman 
F. Paul Quatramoni 
Barbara J. Tupper 
Gay W. D'Amaro 
William A. Hajjar 



TOWN CLERK 



TREASURER 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



SELECTMEN 



ASSESSORS 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Barbara J. Stephenson 
Susan A. Parker 
Gretchen B. Childs 
Marilyn A. Connors 
Michael T. Howard 
Richard M. Fitzpatrick 



Term Expires 
1987 

1988 
1987 
1989 



1987 
1988 
1989 



1987 
1987 
1988 
1989 



1987 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1989 



1987 
1987 
1988 
1988 
1989 
1989 



*Elected to fill vacancy until election 



PLANNING BOARD 



Sarsfield P. Brennan 
Joseph R. Parker, Jr. 
Margaret E. Bancroft 
John Gagliani 
Joseph D. Codispoti 



Mary V. Gillis 
Sandra Fitch 
Christopher Lennon 
William J. Heller 
Robert ¥. Miller 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 



Term Expires 

1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 



1987 
1987 
1987 
1989 
1989 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Jane N. Kelly, State appointed 

Peter A. Gaines 

Ralph K. Maider, Jr.* 

Richard M. Denton 

Mark C. O'Connor, resigned 

Diane Nightingale 



FIRE CHIEF 
Joesph E. Ryan 
CHIEF OF POLICE 
William H. Mann 

SERGEANTS 

Patrick W. Clancy, resigned Ronald E. Kerr 

Raymond T. Wheeler, Provisional 

POLICE OFFICERS 



September 10, 



1986 
1987 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 



George W. Kingsbury 



Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 



Stephen P. Grover 
Thomas M.LaPlante, 
Robert E. Naughton 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 



PERMANENT INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS 



Jr. , resigned 



Ray M. Burton 
Dana Friend 
Ruth E. Gaffey 
Shawn Garvey 
Robert G. Hudson 
Richard Kelcourse 
John Mayer 

*Elected to fill vacancy until election 

7 



Thomas P. McNiff 
James Nagle, resigned 
Michael Riggs 
Doreen Ryan 
Brian J. Scully 
Paul J. Sullo 
John W. Wilhelmi 



APPOINTMENTS MADE 
BY SELECTMEN 

TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 

Term Expires 

Michael J. Sullivan 1987 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Kenneth P. Feeney 1987 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Michael J. Sullivan 1987 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles Fuller, Jr. 1987 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Edward J. Toomey 1987 

Neil D. MacKenzie 1988 

William A. Tosches 1989 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

H. Tracy Mitchell 1987 

Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 1988 

Michael J. Rogers 1989 

WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

Harry C. Merrow 1987 

Leland D. Beverage 1988 

Thomas Williams 1989 

John D. Williams, Associate Member 1987 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 

Malcolm Gibson 1987 

TREE WARDEN 

Malcolm Gibson 1987 

FIELD DRIVER AND FENCE VIEWER 

John P. 0' Toole 1987 



DOG OFFICER 



Louise Papadoyiannis 

Stephen M. Shaw, Assistant, resigned 

Carla Mahaney, Assistant 

Kenneth R. Burd, Assistant 



Term Expires 

1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



Karen MacGregor 

Wilbur M. Salter, D.V.M., Assistant 



1987 
1987 



POUND KEEPER 



Roy Owen 



1987 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



John P. 0' Toole, Inspector of Buildings 

Anthony Calo, Local Inspector of Buildings 

Walter R. Nye, Gas Inspector, Resigned 

Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 

John A. Rose, Jr., Assistant Gas Inspector 

Michael Wright, Acting Assistant Gas Inspector 

John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 

Walter R. Nye, Assistant Plumbing Inspector, Resigned 

Peter Navis, Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 

Tauno 0. Aalto, Assistant Wiring Inspector 



1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



OFFICIAL GREETER OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 



Joseph L. Marcionette 



1987 



OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 



Austin C. Buchanan 

Edward M. Hinkley, Assistant 



1987 
1987 



Mary I. MairEtienne 
Roberta Kolsti 
William H. Dunlea, Jr. 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



VETERANS' DEPARTMENT 



1987 
1988 
1989 



Paul F. Curran, Director, Agent, Burial Agent 
G. Marshall Chick, Graves Officer 



1987 
1987 



COLLECTOR OF WATER AND SEWER USE CHARGES 



Nancy J. Preston 



1989 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Patricia A. Rioux 



1987 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



Patricia A. Rioux 



Patricia A. Rioux 



PUBLIC WEIGHER 



CONSTABLES AND KEEPERS OF THE LOCK UP 



Term Expires 
1987 

1987 



Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
Patrick W. Clancy 
Robert Currie 
Dana Friend 
Ruth A. Gaffey 
John T. Garvey 
Shawn Garvey 
Lawrence Goldman 
Stephen H. Grover 
Ronald E. Kerr 
George W. Kingsbury 
Charles F. LaBrache 



Gretchen B. Childs 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Priscilla J. Mahoney 
Elisabeth T. Mann 
Mary L. Solari 



Gretchen B. Childs 
Jessie A. Erskine 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Priscilla J. Mahoney 
Mary I. MairEtienne 
Elisabeth T. Mann 
Carol Ann Palmieri 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Mary Solari 



Thomas M. LaPlante, 
William H. Mann 
John Mayer 
Michael Mushnick 
James Nagle 
Robert E. Naughton 
Carol Ann Palmieri 
Michael Riggs 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Do re en Ryan 
Raymond J. Wheeler 
John Wilhelmi 



SCHOOL TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



POLICE MATRONS 



Jr. 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICER - BEN FRANKLIN SECURITY 

Ronald A. Taddeo ' 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICER - ROCKY WOODS 

Stephen E. Bassett 



1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



10 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS - MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 



Charles Coffone 

James Gibson 

Joseph Harkins, III 

Valerie Jones 

William J. Marchand, Jr. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



Robert McGrath 
Greg Plesh 
Leo J. Prince 
John Rogers 



Leo Acera 
Albert Baima 
Walter Barnes 
Bruce A. Berry- 
Edwin Bettencourt 
Lawrence Brackett 
Leo N. Brennan 
Albert Brown 
Herbert Burr 
Ray M. Burton, Jr. 
James Campbell 
William A. Carlson 
Herbert M. Carr 
Jonathan M. Carroll 
Joseph Carvalho 
Vincent Cellucci 
Clinton Clark 
Joseph Conconnon 
Robert E. Currie 
William J. Davis 
Robert Dixon 
Kenneth W. Dunbar 
David C. Egy 
Robert Eklund 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Jonathan Gifford 
John Holmes 
David J. Holt 
William D. Jones 
George Katapodis 
Edward Kerwin, Sr. 
Robert J. Larkin 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Ben B. Korbly 
Hilda Needle 
Mary M. Downing 
Arthur L. Farrar 
Carl J. Brewer 

Madeleine I. Harding, Associate Member 
Susan Mastronardi, Associate Member- 
Nancy C. Munroe, Associate Member 
Annie M. Rogers, Associate Member 



Alfred Leverone 
James Love joy 
Roderick MacLeod 
David R. McConnell 
Thomas McNiff 
William Meau 
Paul J. Murphy 
Rene Neveux 
Frank S. Newell 
Carol Ann Palmieri 
Gene Piken 
Stephen K. Plympton 
Charles E. Ray 
William R. Reagan 
Walter F. Reynolds 
David Riggs 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Walter Robinson 
Joseph E. Ryan 
Robert J. Shannon 
Carl Sheridan 
Paul Sicard 
Charles H. Stone, Jr. 
John F. Sullivan 
Herbert Talerman 
J. Robert Tosi 
William Triefol 
Armando R. Viera, Jr. 
Thomas Walsh 
Thomas Ward 
Alan F. Washkewits 
Alfred B. Wood, Jr. 



Term Expires 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1987 
1987 
1988 
1988 
1989 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



11 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING - SUBDIVISION CONTROL 



Burgess P. Standley 

Ralph C. Good, Jr. 

Robert F. Sylvia 

Harry A. Kelleher, Associate Member, resigned 

Sandra G. Munsey, Associate Member 

Charles H. Peck, Associate Member 

Bernard J. Monbouquette, Associate Member 



Term Expires 


April 


1987 


April 


1988 


April 


1989 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 



ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS COMMITTE 



Pauline A. Coulter 

Robert Coulter 

Beverly Hallowell 

Bruno J. Palumbo 

Charles H. Rayner, Jr. , resigned 

Christie A. Shoop 

Michael J. Sullivan 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 



Stephen W. Cook 
Gay W. D'Amaro 
Francis A. Iafolla 
Stephanie J. Loer 
Susan A. Parker, resigned 
William F. Pope 
Patricia Quintina 
Rosalie Shirley 



MEDFIELD REPRESENTATIVE - BAY 



April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


CIRCUIT GREENBELT 





Jesse Matuson 



CABLE T.V. COMMITTEE 



Libby Allison 

Jane B. Archer 

Oliver R. Brooks 

James W. Jackson, resigned 

William F. Kean 

Thomas M. Reis 

Richard P. Sassone 

Robert K. Sawyer, Jr. 

Nancy Temple 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Donald H. Harding 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Nancy Temple 
Ann B. Thompson 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



12 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



Fred W. Clarridge, Jr. 
Lorraine G. Holland 
Thelma M. Meader 



Daniel ¥. Nye 
David L. Owen 
Roy C. Watson 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



Vincent M. Cellucci, Director 

John E. Varnum, Jr. , Deputy Director 

Richard Ostrander, Underwater Rescue and Recovery 

Patrick S. Harris, Chief Radio Operator 

Judith C. Harris, Radio Operator 

Gene L. Piken, Radio Operator 

Patricia A. Rioux, Shelter Manager 

CIVIL DEFENSE AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS 



Term Expires 

April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 



Vincent M. Cellucci, Deputy Chief 

John E. Varnum, Jr., Captain 

Bruce Berry, Sergeant 

Albert Brown, Sergeant 

Herbert Talerman, Range Sergeant 

Raymond Burton, Jr. 

Robert E. Currie 

Jonathan Gifford 

Lawrence Goldman 

Thomas Hamano 

Judith C. Harris 

Patrick S. Harris 

James T. Kashalena 

John Mayer 

Thomas P. McNiff 

James P. Nagle 

Tara Ann Nagle 

Gene L. Piken 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Armando R. Viera, Jr. 

Leonard Vitale 



April ' 


987 


April ' 


987 


April ' 


987 


April ' 


987 


April ' 


987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1 987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Charles Fuller, Jr. 
Willard T. Roy 
Robert F. Savage 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Ann B. Thompson 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



John Carmichael 

Carol Dennison 

McClure E. Ellsworth, II 

Valerie Ellsworth 

David L. Owen 

Roy Owen 

Harold Pritoni 

Karen L. Wingett 



April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



13 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Jesse L. Matuson 

Douglas Campbell, resigned 

John F. Guthrie, resigned 

Betty A. Kaerwer 

Bernard J. Monbouquette 

David H. Morrish 

Douglas S. Sparrow 

Ann Lee Howell 

Robert A. Kinsman 

Stephen Bassett, Associate Member 

John H. Beale, Associate Member 

Richard W. Bryant, Associate Member 

Daniel V. Fritzsche, Associate Member 

Edmund P. Hammond, Associate Member 

Hanson C. Robbins, Associate Member 



Term Expires 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1989 


April 


1989 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



Robert J. Larkin 
William F. Nourse 
Paul E. Hinkley 
Ann B. Thompson 



April 1987 
April 1988 
April 1989 
April 1989 



DRAINAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 



Sarsfield P. Brennan 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Robert E. Kennedy 



Robert A. Kinsman 

William H. Mann 

Robert Savage, resigned 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RESPONSE COMMITTEE 



Robert E. Currie 
William H. Mann 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
Joseph E. Ryan 
James D. Sullivan, M.D. 
Michael J. Sullivan 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



ENFORCING OFFICER FOR ZONING 



John P. 0' Toole 
Anthony Calo, Assistant 



April 
April 



1987 
1987 



FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 



Roy McQuillan 
Diane Nightingale 
Arlene D. Sanford 
Robert G. Stokes 
Rev. Robert L. Wood 



April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 



STUDY COMMITTEE TO DEVELOP 458 MAIN STREET 



Jane B. Archer 
Walter M. Frank 



John Gagliani 
Thelma Spicer 



Roy C. Watson 



14 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COOED INATOR 

Term Expires 

Robert H. Janoch, Jr. April 1987 

HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 

Edith A. Beale, resigned April 1987 

John H. Beale April 1987 

David Bivolcic April 1987 

Robert H. Janoch, Jr. April 1987 

Jesse L. Matuson April 1987 

Donald R. Senger April 1987 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Eleanor M. Anes April 1987 

Robert J. Mannino April 1987 

Ann S. Mentzer April 1987 

Nancy L. Codispoti April 1988 

Donald J. MacDonald April 1988 

David L. Owen April 1988 

Donna A. Terzian April 1989 

Robert A. Dellaselva, Associate Member April 1987 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member April 1987 

David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member April 1987 

HOME OWNERSHIP PROGRAM STUDY COMMITTEE 

Joseph P. Abbis, Jr. Peter A. Gaines 

Michael Cunningham, resigned Norman A. Gray, Jr. 

Richard M. Denton Gary MacDonald 

John Gagliani Ann B. Thompson 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING AUTHORITY 

Robert J. McCarthy April 1987 

Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. April 1988 

Charles H. Peck April 1989 

Ann Lee Howell April 1990 

Stephen Buckley, Jr. April 1991 

INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Charles W. Jenks, Jr. April 1987 

Harry A. Kelleher, resigned April 1987 

Edward J. MacDonald April 1987 

Joseph B. McWilliams April 1987 

MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 

Michael J. Sullivan April 1987 

MEDFIELD-NORFOLK PRISON PROJECT SCREENING COMMITTEE 

Arthur L. Farrar April 1987 



15 



MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Denise L. Coyle 
Michael J. Cronin 
John Hasenjaeger 
Judith Joseph 
Bernard J. Monbouquette 



Jeanne Savage 
William Scollins 
Oscar L. Wallace 
Kathleen A. Whelan 
Katherine Ziegler 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



Margaret E. Bancroft 



Term Expires 
August 3> 1989 



MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 



Paul F. Curran 






April 1987 


Robert J. Larkin 






April 1987 


Albert J. Mangane 


llo, 


Jr. 


April 1987 


William H. Mann 






April 1987 


Frank Mayer 






April 1987 


Irene 0' Toole 






April 1987 


Joseph F. Ryan 






April 1987 


James F. Tubridy 




MUNICIPAL CENSUS SUPERVISOR 


April 1987 



Nancy J. Preston April 1987 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE NORFOLK COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 



Robert J. Larkin 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Jesse L. Matuson 



April 1987 



OPEN SPACE PLANNING COMMITTEE 



Eric W. O'Brien 
Hanson C. Robbins 



REPRESENTATIVE TO "OUTER 64" MBTA COMMITTEE 



Gregg R. Streamer 



Nancy J. Preston 



Ellis N. Allen 
John H. Beale 
William M. Jackson 
Graeme Justice 
Robert A. Kinsman 
Alan D. Paul 



PARKING CLERK AND HEARING OFFICER 



PESTICIDE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



April 1987 



April 1989 



April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 



POLICE RADIO SYSTEM STUDY COMMITTEE 



Werner F. Kiessling 
William H. Mann 
Robert E. Naughton 



Gene L. Piken 
Charles G. Seavey 



16 



JOINT REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 



Sarsfield P. Brennan 



Edward J. Toomey 



Jane B. Archer 
Marguerite M. Eppich 
Kenneth P. Feeney 



Edward J. Brabazon 
Sarsfield P. Brennan 
Daniel V. Fritzche 



Sybil S. Ashe 
Margaret E. Bancroft 
William H. Mann 



ACTING RIGHT-TO-KNOW COORDINATOR 



Term Expires 
April 1987 

April 1987 



SAFETY COMMITTEE 



Pauline M. Goucher 
Daniel Hogan 



SOUTH STREET COMMITTEE 



Joseph R. Parker, Jr. 
David F. Temple 



TOWN HALL PARKING LOT COMMITTEE 



Kenneth A. McGinnis 
Nancy J. Preston 



TRANSFER STATION LIAISON COMMITTEE 



Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 



Scott A. Anderson 
Frederick S. Aronstein 
Denise M. Barton 
Lisa N. Cassidy 
Lisa M. Craig 
Gay W. D' Amaro 
Paula DeVasto 
Joseph J. DiGiovanni 
Eric J. Doucette 
Christopher W. Enz 
Barton W. Garrison 
Mary V. Gillis 
Brian W. Hajjar 
William J. Heller 
Thomas M. LaPlante 
George N. Mendrinos 
Jeffrey D. Miner 
Brian G. Murphy 
Robert E. Naughton 
Matthew Notine 
Kathleen A. O'Connor 
Thomas G. O'Leary, Jr. 
Joshua R. Peck 
Michael T. Sweeney 
Christopher R. Swezey 
Robert W. Wallace 
Jason C. Weinert 



Kenneth P. Feeney 
YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Michael J. Sullivan 



September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 
September 30 



1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 
1987 



17 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TAX 

COLLECTOR 



DEPUTY COLLECTORS 

Peter Bartkewicz June M. Doucette Debra Greene, resigned 

Nancy Griffin 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
ASSESSORS 

Term Expires 

Stanley E. Bergeron, Assistant Assessor April 1987 

C. B. Doub, Assistant Assessor April 1987 

Marjorie M. Temple, Assistant Assessor April 1987 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN 

ACCOUNTANT 

Irene L. 0' Toole, Assistant Accountant 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN 

CLERK 

Nancy S. Franke, Assistant Town Clerk 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Assistant Hearing Officer 

APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF SELECTMEN 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND MODERATOR TO REGIONAL 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Term Expires 
Albert G. Chouinard June 30, 1989 

18 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
FIRE CHIEF 



Ellis N. Allen, Deputy Fire Chief 

Charles G. Seavey, Captain 

Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 

George DeVenanzi, Lieutenant 

William Kingsbury, Lieutenant-Clerk 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
BOARD OF HEALTH 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE OUTREACH PROGRAM 



Lois Cardell 

William H. Mann 

Diane Wallace-Sangren 

Virginia Cusack, resigned 

Lois Lambert 

William A. Tosches 

Thomas M. Reis, Associate Member 



AGENTS 



William R. Domey, P.E., Engineer/Agent 
John J. Keefe, R.S., Milk Inspector/Agent 
Mae L. Otting, Administrative Assistant 



BOARD OF HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Term Expires 

April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 



April 1987 
April 1987 
April 1987 



Jean P. Clark 
Madeleine I. Harding 
Nancy C. Kashalena 



A. Ritchey Stagg, M.D. 
James D. Sullivan, M.D. 
Rev. Robert L. Wood 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 



DEPUTY MODERATOR 



Tidal B. Henry 



April 1987 



19 



WARRANT COMMITTEE 







Term Expires 


Werner F. Kiessling 




April 


1987 


Neal R. Olsen 




April 


1987 


Janet M. Taylor 




April 


1987 


David A. Dolan 




April 


1988 


Edith A. Beale 




April 


1988 


Donald H. Harding 




April 


1988 


Robert F. Savage, resigned 




April 


1988 


Michael Kosc 




April 


1989 


William F. Neeb, Jr. 




April 


1989 


Clarence A. Purvis 


PERSONNEL BOARD 


April 


1989 



Thomas N. Fannin 
Paul J. Williamson 
John D'Angelo, Jr. 



November 30, 1987 
November 30, 1988 
November 30, 1989 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
PERSONNEL BOARD 



COMPENSATION SUBCOMMITTEE 



William A. Hajjar 
William F. Nourse 



Neal R. Olsen 
Paul J. Williamson 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
PLANNING BOARD 



MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



Donald E. Church 
Connie Jones 
Juliana Alasso 
Marion L. Polzella 
Martha L. Smick 
Daniel L. Jones, Jr. 
David G. Strimaitus 
Newton H. Thompson 



Helen K. Wienart, resigned 
Juliana Alasso 
Philip P. Bonanno 
Joseph D. Codispoti 
Richard Moon 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



June 


28, 


1987 


June 


28, 


1987 


June 


28, 


1988 


June 


28, 


1988 


June 


28, 


1988 


June 


28, 


1989 


June 


28, 


1989 


June 


28, 


1989 


January- 


15, 


1987 


January 


15, 


1988 


January 


15, 


1988 


January 


15, 


1989 


January 


15, 


1989 



20 



DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1986 



21 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

We, in Medfield, continue to enjoy the benefits of living in a 
community whose school and town departments are ever vigilant to be certain 
that we offer the best services for our townspeople. A host of good and 
valuable citizens continue to volunteer their time and expertise to help to 
make Medfield a better place in which to live. This will be obvious as one 
reads our report. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

The year began with a special town meeting called to accept educational 
funding from the State for the teachers. This was followed by a request 
from the School Committee to include a referendum calling for an override 
of Proposition 2-% for $175,000 for school purposes only. The question was 
expanded to also include funding for town expenses of $150,000 and subse- 
quently failed at our election in March. 

SOLID WASTE 

While we opened the new transfer station this year and have determined 
that our landfill will have room to accept the waste generated from the 
transfer station for a period of approximately five years, solid waste 
continues to be the major problem facing not only this community but the 
nation as well. After much study and deliberation, at year's end, we signed 
an agreement, which is subject to town meeting approval, to take trash to a 
site in Millbury in the future. While we don't have an immediate problem 
locally, we must look to the future. It was our judgment that at a later 
date, such an opportunity may not exist. 

INSURANCE 

Accelerated insurance costs continue to plague us. Along with our 
Insurance Advisory Committee members, we continue to investigate all options, 
However, it is an expense over which we have very little control but one 
with which we must contend. Medicare insurance coverage became mandatory 
by vote of the federal government and was effective April 1. Any newly 
hired employee, including summer help, must participate in the Medicare pro- 
gram which requires a weekly payroll deduction of 1.45% of wages which must 
be matched by the town. Federal revenue sharing funds were used in the past 
to reduce the insurance budget, but they are no longer available. 

MBTA 

At the end of the year we were informed our MBTA assessment would in- 
crease by $50,000 or 33%. State government mandates this assessment, 
another one over which we do not have control. 

PARK ON FORMER ST. EDWARD'S CHURCH PROPERTY 

After considerable review and planning, the committee studying 458 
Main Street town property adjacent to the Library concluded that a park 

22 



should be built on the premises. We hired a landscape architect and at the 
end of the year were reviewing landscape plans, anticipating completion of 
the new park during 1987. 

CABLE TV 

The Cable TV Committee was expanded this year to a larger number to 
work with the Cablevision supplier to provide a studio and to educate those 
who volunteer to learn to become technicians locally. A studio will be lo- 
cated at the Junior High School and various local channels will be available. 
We expect this to take place early in 1987. 

MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 

During 1986 we continued to enjoy excellent communication with the 
officials of the Medfield State Hospital. We realize the potential for 
growth at this institution and are ever cognizant of the feelings and 
desires of the residents of the area and of the town. We will continue to 
make every effort to be apprised of any potential changes. 

The sewer system was connected into the Town's treatment plant. The 
Treatment Plant is now doing what it was designed to do, funneling all the 
sewerage through the Plant, ending pollution of the Charles River. 

Leaks were detected throughout the water distribution system. The Town 
is working cooperatively with the Hospital officials to correct this problem. 

MEDFIELD-NORFOLK PRISON PROJECT 

The Prison Project has remained at 36 inmates, many of whom who have 
worked at various municipal job sites performing tasks which have resulted 
in considerable savings for the Town. There was a move to increase the 
numbers participating in the program which the Selectmen opposed. We also 
received a petition from 874 residents who were unequivocally opposed to an 
expansion of the Medfield State Hospital Prison Project or the conversion of 
the hospital to any other form of prison, whether minimum or maximum 
security. We brought this to the attention of the Governor and our legis- 
lators, who have cooperated with us. 

GIFT OF LAND UNDER CLUSTER ZONING BYLAW 

We accepted a deed for 9.5 acres of land for municipal use from the 
Castle Hill Estates under the terms of the cluster zoning bylaw. This is 
the first gift of land under the provisions of the cluster zoning, which 
provides for not less than 25% of the area to be open space, owned by a 
membership corporation, trust, association, Town or otherwise. 

SOUTH STREET WIDENING 

During the first few months of the year we studied the proposed ex- 
pansion and listened to the residents of the area who generally opposed the 
plan. The final plan was the result of work done by the Norfolk County 
Engineers and our own committee members, which was accepted at town meeting. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

During the year leaves of absence were granted to two policemen and 
they subsequently resigned at the end of the year. We were sorry to lose 
Sergeant Patrick W. Clancy who has been an excellent superior officer and an 

23 



Officer of the department since 1970. Officer Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. also 

served the department well for several years. We were pleased to promote. 

Officer Ray wheeler to Sergeant and to appoint two new officers, John Mayer 
and John Wilhelmi. 

A new radar was purchased which resulted in a decided increase in en- 
forcement of our traffic laws. From time to time we are requested to pro- 
hibit trucks from certain streets and provide more enforcement of speeders. 
We cannot prohibit truck traffic without providing an alternate route. We 
will ask for an additional officer for the expressed purpose of providing 
more surveillance. 

GRANTS 

Through the efforts of Planning Board member Margaret Bancroft, the 
Town received a Bay Circuit Planning Grant in the amount of $7,000 to 
develop a Resource Protection Plan update for recreation, conservation and 
watershed protection planning. The overall purpose of the planning grant 
program is to enable cities and towns to plan for open space preservation 
and the creation of a system of connected parks and open spaces in 50 com- 
munities surrounding Boston in the Boston Metropolitan Area from Ipswich to 
Duxbury. However, it will be useful locally for many years to come. 

We were pleased that through the endeavors of our Administrative 
Assistant Pauline Goucher, we received a planning grant in the amount of 
$2,675. from the State Energy Resources office which ultimately resulted in 
a grant totalling $51,603. to fund energy improvements in the Town Hall, 
Fire Station, Pfaff Recreation Center and Library including insulation in 
several buildings and heating system replacement in Town Hall, weather- 
stripping and automatic setback controls in the Fire Station and automatic 
heating system controls in the Pfaff Center, all of which will reduce future 
energy costs. 

HOME OWNERSHIP PROGRAM 

We informed the state of our interest in the Home Ownership Program 
and appointed a committee composed of a Selectman, Housing Authority members. 
Planning Board and citizens at large to study and investigate the many as- 
pects of this program. In September, the committee reported affirmatively 
that there is a demonstrated need for moderate income housing and recom- 
mended initially that not more than twenty units be built on town property. 
The committee will continue to pursue this and town meeting will act on the 
matter. 

ELECTIONS 

Early in the year Richard Fitzpatrick was elected to fill the balance 
of the term of Elizabeth Martin and was subsequently elected in March to a 
term as Library Trustee. 

Carol Rossi was elected to fill the remainder of the term of her 
brother, Melville J. Mills as Assessor. Mel was an outstanding town 
official for 21 years contributing much to the efficient operation of the 
Assessors' office. We note his passing with great sadness. 

Ralph Kenneth Maider, Jr. was elected to serve until the next election 
on the Housing Authority, filling the vacancy caused by the resignation of 
Mark O'Connor. 



24 




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25 



TRIBUTES 

We bid a fond farewell to Harry A. Kelleher in September when former 
Selectman Kelleher and his wife, Louise left Medfield for a new retirement 
home in Florida. It would be nearly impossible to list all his contributions 
to Medfield, but suffice it to say he bagan in the 60' s as an advocate of 
the Master Plan, he was Selectman from 1968 to 1977, first member from 
Medfield on the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, Appeal Board member, in- 
fluential and a worker for the town in insurance matters, building the town 
garage, treatment plant, sidewalks and police station as well as the build- 
ing of the Junior High School and Wheelock School. One could ask, "How 
could one person do so much?" Harry did it with a flourish. 

The Board of Selectmen was alerted that Conrail had plans to install a 
flexiflow unloading facility in Medfield. We immediately contacted our 
United States Senator Barney Frank who was successful in keeping this out of 
Medfield. It is rewarding to have a Congressman who will respond quickly to 
our concerns. 

Walter Nye resigned as Gas Inspector, a position he held since 1961. 
He was our first Gas Inspector. His is an enviable record. 

John Ganley served as Registrar for 15 years and chose not to be re- 
appointed. His ability and dependability were great assets to the Town. 

We were pleased to have the opportunity to proclaim Sunday, June 22nd 
as Walter M. Frank Day to mark the occasion when he received the Outstand- 
ing Citizen of the Year award from the Medfield Lions Club. This honor was 
richly deserved by Walter who was a Selectman from 1967 to 1970, held other 
elective and appointive posts and has continuously served Medfield since 
1960. 

Chairman Robert Miller of the Park and Recreation Commission was 
commended by the Board for the outstanding appearance of the Pfaff Center 
and for the reception he held to honor previous Park and Recreation 
Commissioners . 

POW/MIA Day ceremonies were held on September 19th at Town Hall and the 
flag displayed, recognizing there are 2,400 still missing or otherwise un- 
accounted for in Indochina. 

On May 4th it was our pleasure to honor one of our well known residents, 
Raymond Berry, who led the New England Patriots to their first ever Superbowl 
and is the American Football Conference Coach of the Year. We are proud and 
pleased to have him as a resident of the town and joined with other towns- 
people to recognize him. 

One of our last actions in December was to honor Representative Andrew 
S. Natsios who has represented the 8th Middlesex District since 1978 and 
was an effective and responsive legislator for the Town. He gained the ad- 
miration and respect of elected and appointed town officials. 



26 



CITIZEN INPUT WELCOME 

The Selectmen regularly meet on Tuesday evenings commencing at 7:00 p.m. 
at the Town House. Appointments may be made by calling the Selectmen's 
office. However, time will be reserved for residents from 7:00 to 7:10 p.m. 
at each meeting to meet the Board and bring matters to our attention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Rob&ut J. LcUiksln, Chairman 

WilLlam F. NouAAZ, Clerk 

Ann B. Thompson, III Member 





SELECTMEN HONOR RETIRING GAS INSPECTOR 
WALTER NYE 



27 



CABLE TV COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

It is the purpose of the Community Cable Television Committee to provide 
to the residents of Medfield the opportunity to participate in the local 
origination of cable television programming of community interest, from 
studio and portable facilities provided to the Town by its cable television 
licensee, Massachusetts Cablevision. The Cable Committee is responsible for 
administering the public access funding paid by the licensee for such pur- 
poses. 1986 was the first full year of operation for the committee and was 
marked by significant, if slow, progress toward our goal of commencing pro- 
gramming on Medfield Cable Television. 

After carefully evaluating how other communities in Massachusetts re- 
gulate and administer community cable television, the committee recommended, 
and the Board of Selectmen approved, increasing the size of the committee 
from five (5) to eight (8) members. Once the public access channel is oper- 
ational, the committee will divide into two (2) separate entities: 

1. a Town committee of three (3) members to oversee the compliance of 
the cable licensee and the operation of all 5 local channels (safety, gov- 
ernment, library, school and public access); and 

2. an independant public corporation with five (5) directors (elected 
by-cable subscribers), to administer the access channel and access funding. 

The committee has been unable to set up the independant public access 
corporation, due to a conflict between the State's CATV Regulatory Commission 
and Department of Revenue. The former agency has recommended such a corpor- 
ation to dozens of communities, while the latter agency has advised us that 
setting the same up may violate state law. As 1986 closed, this conflict has 
yet to be resolved, so the Town committee will temporarily continue to ad- 
minister public access until the issue is clarified. 

During 1986, the public access studio facilities were constructed in the 
Middle School. This was a frustrating process, as completion commitment dates 
of July 15th, then September 1st, passed with little progress. By year's 
end, however, final plans had been approved, equipment selected and ordered 
and completion appears to be a reality early in 1987. The new Program Co- 
ordinator, Jay Fadden, will start our first workshops for residents in mid 
January. These free workshops will teach interested residents basic skills 
of equipment operation and television production. Each participant will be 
asked to contribute a reasonable number of hours on the studio crews for 
future cable productions. 



28 



The committee wishes to express our thanks to the members of the Board of 
Selectmen, to Michael Sullivan and to Town Counsel Charles Fuller for their 
support of our work during 1986. We also wish to thank those residents who 
have been waiting so patiently to get involved in public access programming. 
While we have been disappointed at the delays during this year, we are con- 
fident that the foundation that was laid during 1986 will result in a strong, 
active public access program in Medfield for many years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Libby hJULUbOVi, Treasurer 
Jane. B. foioktn, Clerk 
OtivzA R. Biook* 
WWLlam F. Kextn 
ThomcU) M. R2AJ> 

RickcVid P. S<X6-60tt£ 

Nancy Temple. 

RobQAt K. SawyeA, Jti. , Chairman 




SELECTMAN LARKIN PROCLAIMS RAYMOND BERRY DAY 



29 




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30 



STREETS, WATER, AND SEWER 
DEPARTMENTS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1986. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

Resurfacing : The yearly preventative maintenance involved repairing streets 
by means of the grader, patch and stone seal program. The Highway Depart- 
ment put on 4,511 tons of hot top and 700 tons of stone seal in Fiscal 1986. 

Rocky Lane : Rocky Lane was reconstructed and hot topped in 1986. The 
finishing touches will be completed in 1987. 

Drainage : A series of catch basins and 200 feet of pipe were installed to 
end a ponding problem on West Mill Street at the Harding Street end. 

The County Engineers have completed plans for drainage on Farm and North 
Streets. Also, plans for drainage on Spring Street have been completed and 
drainage will be installed in 1987. 

Fire Roads : Fire Roads were kept clear by the Highway Department. 

Snow : In 1986, we had 12 snowstorms and 21 call-outs for sanding and salt- 
ing operations. Total accumulation for the year was 26^ inches. 

Landfill ; With the new restrictions on commercial trash and the opening of 
the Transfer Station, engineering estimates for the life of the landfill re- 
main at five years. We have applied to the Department of Environmental 
Quality Engineering for a vertical expansion of the existing site which 
would increase the life of the landfill by an additional four years. 

Transfer Station : The Transfer Station was dedicated and opened in October 
1986. Many people have commented on the cleanliness and the convenience of 
the operation. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

The total sewer revenue for 1986 was $237,861. which is up $78,952 
from 1985 due to additional homes and the State Hospital tie in. 

Honors : The Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant was nominated for quality 
of treatment and efficiency of operation by the Department of Environmental 
Quality Engineering and earned top recognition in New England. 

Composting : 1986 marked the first complete year of composting the treat- 
ment plant sludge. The sludge passed the EPA Toxicity test and was rated 
suitable for use as part of the final cover on the landfill. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

The Water Department pumped approximately 412,000,000 gallons of water 

31 




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from our four wells in 1986. This was a 12% increase over 1985. The latter 
part of 1986 the State Hospital Wells were shut down because of problems 
with their aquifer. This prompted a Department of Environmental Quality 
Engineering investigation. Originally it was thought that back-flushing 
would solve the problem, but after the D.E.Q.E. inspection, the Hospital 
Wells were cited for a half-dozen problems. It appears the increase in 
usage of Medfield's wells in 1987 will exceed 40%. 

Bridge Street : The Bridge Street water main was cleaned in October of 1986. 
The project took 7 days. It has seemed to have solved the rusty water 
problem. 

TRIBUTES 

The long time secretary for the Highway Department, Nancy Franke suf- 
fered a heart attack in the fall of 1986. She is now recovering at home. 
We wish her a speedy recovery and return to work. 

James Gorman retired after 21 years of service. Good Luck, Jim. 
The Medfield Public Works would like to welcome Tom Seeley to the Water 
Department. 

In conclusion, appreciation is expressed to Frances Brennan, Gertrude 
Simpson and Nancy Franke, secretaries whose work contributes to the success- 
ful operation of the several departments. 

Robert Kennedy, Street Department Foreman, Charles Evans, Water and 
Sewer Foreman, and Peter Iafolla, Chief Operator of the Treatment Plant, and 
all the men of the various departments are to be commended for their 
excellent public service. > 

Respectfully submitted, 

KZYinztk P. Fee.net/, Superintendent 
PUBLIC WORKS 



33 




FUTURE LOCATION OF NEW TOWN COMMON 
34 



COMMITTEE FOR THE RE-USE OF 
458 MAIN STREET 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Following affirmative action at the Annual Town Meeting to provide 
additional funding under the Capital Budget for a park and parking spaces, 
we worked closely with the landscape architect selected to design a park 
on the Town property adjacent to the Memorial Public Library. We selected 
the plan for the site including brick sidewalks and New Orleans lighting 
consistent with the textures at the Medfield Town Hall, landscaping, 
benches, a gazebo and parking spaces behind the library. 

Following approval of the Zoning Board of Appeals allowing a municipal 
use on this property, work will commence and a park will be enjoyed during 
1987. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jokn GclqIaxlviL, Chairman 
ZOVKL ktickoA, Secretary 
WaltoJi F/ianfc 
TkeZma Splcox 
Roy {jJcuUon 



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SELECTMAN HONOR REPRESENTATIVE ANDREW S. NATSIOS 



35 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In February, 1986 the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised 
regulation concerning storage tanks and containers. Our committee has spent 
most of its time incorporating the new regulations into a workable and equi- 
table town bylaw. 

The bylaw submitted last year by this committee was withdrawn due to 
conflict created by change in emphasis of implementing authority. Current 
authority is through the Board of Fire Prevention Regulations. The State 
Fire Marshal's Office Department of Public Safety is given regulatory au- 
thority under 527 CMR 9.00 and powers authorized by Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 22, Section 14; and local authority under Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 40, Section 21 and Chapter 148, Sections 9, 10, 28 and 37. 

The proposed Medfield Bylaw for regulating underground hazardous mate- 
rial storage recognizes current authorities. 

Meetings have been held through the year to refine the intent and lan- 
guage of the bylaw to be presented at Town Meeting, 1987. 

Salient features of the revised bylaw are: 

1) Permits required for existing, new and modified tanks. 
Evidence of age of existing tanks required, otherwise 
assumed to be 10 years old. Renewal permit every 5 years. 

2) New tanks prohibited in flood plains, watershed and 
aquifer and groundwater protection areas. 

3) Residential tank removal after 20 years. Three year 
grace period set after passage of bylaw. New residential 
underground tanks prohibited altogether. 

4) Bylaw does not affect tanks located inside buildings (i.e., 
most residential heating fuel tanks not affected.) 

5) Tightness testing of all non-residential tanks during 
installation and at 10, 13, 15, 17, and 19 years and 
annually thereafter. 

6) Strict inventory control (for leak detection) for tanks 
containing automotive fuels and waste oils. 

7) Leak response procedure. 

8) Thirty dollar/day fine for violations. 

9) Administration by Fire Chief, with participation of Town 
Clerk, Board of Health, Water and Sewer Board and Conservation 
Commission. 

36 



Currently, forty-one municipalities in Massachusetts have been affected 
by contaminated water supplies. Reversal of damage done by contamination 
is possible in the minority of instances (~25%) and is costly. 

We look forward to presenting this proposed bylaw. We hope that the 
town will agree with us that the cost of implementing it will be more than 
outweighed by the protection it will afford our very valuable water 
resources. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jokn Beace, Chairman 
Rob&ut Janock 
Je4-6e McrfuAon 
Vonatd Seng 2A 

HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 




FUTURE TAXPAYER \ \ 



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38 



MEDFIELD PRISON PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

There were no major incidents during this year. 

Superintendent George Grigas was promoted, and replaced by Ernest H. 
Vandergriff early in the year. 

Maximum count (36) of inmates was kept for most of the year. A waiting 
list was also established which helped keep the count full most of the time, 

Inmates Civic Work crews accomplished much for the town in this second 
year of community projects. Over 2,128 hours of labor were volunteered to 
projects at: Library, Swim Pond, Highway Department, Athletic Fields, 
Community Center, Landfill. Fire Station, SNARC, Schools, and the Unitarian 
Church sidewalk. 

Medfield is one of some 30 Towns in the state, which has benefitted 
from use of prisoner labor in the past 12 years. 

The Prison Project is looking forward to working at the new park site 
in the center of town this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

kntkuA I. VaAJWA 

MEDFIELD PRISON PROJECT COMMITTEE 




MAIN AND NORTH STREETS TOWARDS MILLIS 
Photo of painting by Walter Frank 



39 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my sixteenth Annual Report as Fire Chief. 

This past February, Medfield was hit with its worst fire in recent 
history when fire struck the Park Street Medical Building, but with the 
quick and professional work of your town firefighters and the immediate and 
efficient assistance given by the Dover, Millis, Medway and Westwood Fire 
Departments, we were able to keep the fire from spreading to any other build- 
ings on the street. You can be very proud of the men that you have protect- 
ing your lives and property. 

We had three separate incidents involving the leaking of fuel oil. 
There was a leaking pipe at the Junior High School, a leaking pipe at the 
M&M Star Market (which was very minor) , and a leaking fuel truck at the in- 
tersection of Routes 109 and 27. They were handled quickly and without in- 
volvement of any water sources in the town. 

The added construction of the Industrial Park on North Meadows Road and 
the two developments on East Main Street will add to our protection concerns. 
Also there was a new building constructed on Hospital Road which will house 
eight retarded citizens. 

The sprinkler law enacted at the last town meeting which states that all 
buildings with seventy-five hundred square feet or more shall be sprinklered 
will be added protection for our citizens and their businesses. 

This year we replaced our 1941 Ford brush truck with a new four wheel 
drive truck and we purchased and refurbished a 1963 Pirsch ladder truck from 
the Town of Needham. 

During the year I inspected the schools, nursing home, and businesses 
throughout the town. I also attended and spoke to various classes on fire 
safety held in the schools. 

As in the past, Firefighter Stephen Bassett saw to it that all fire- 
fighters were recertified in both Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation and First 
Aid. All firefighters received monthly training under Captain Seavey. 

I would like to thank the officers and men of the department for their 
unselfish devotion to the residents of the town. I also wish to thank the 
Police Chief and all of his personnel who have so ably assisted this depart- 
ment throughout the year, as well as the Building, Gas, Electrical Inspectors 
and the staff of the Town Hall for their assistance this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

3oi>2,pk E. Ryan, Fire Chief 



40 




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SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1986 

Buildings 7 

Brush & Grass 36 

Automobiles 19 

Rubbish 2 

Gasoline Washdowns 2 

Highway Accidents 6 

Electrical 22 

Investigations 83 

Oil or Gas Burners 9 

Mutual Aid 4 

Outside Assistance 7 

Accidental Alarms 69 

Chimneys 9 

Searches 1 

Outdoor Cooking Permits 2 

Duplicating Fluid Permits 4 

Oil Storage Permits 46 

Blasting Permits 41 

Model Rocket Permits 5 

Home Fire Alarm Inspections 37 

Woodburning Stove Inspections 16 

Motor Oil Storage Permits 

Ammunition Permits 

Trains 

Lock Outs 3 

Water Problems 3 

Bomb Scares 

Pumping Cellars 1 

Box Alarms 149 

Still Alarms 148 

False Alarms 7 

Station Duty 

Landfill . 

Televisions 

Rescues 2 

Ovens • 8 

Details 3 

Fence 

Outdoor Burning Permits 959 

Explosive Permits 

Inspections 114 

Propane Gas Permits 12 

Black Powder Permits 2 

Smokeless Powder Permits 8 

Fire Marshal Reports 20 

Bonfire Permits 1 

Derailments 1 

Resale Inspections 263 



42 




FOREST FIRE ENGINE 5 



43 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my annual report for the year ending December 31, 1986. 

PERSONNEL 

I requested that the town add two additional officers to the Department 
again in 1986 but none were added. We were short handed in the coverage 
needed in the town but were augmented by some Special Officers and Permanent 
Intermittent Officers. Sgt. Patrick Clancy requested and was granted a leave 
of absence in April to the end of the year. He resigned in December to pur- 
sue a career in private business. Thomas LaPlante requested and was granted 
a leave of absence in June to the end of the year. He resigned in December 
to pursue a career in the business world. Officer Raymond wheeler was ap- 
pointed Provisional Sergeant to replace Sgt. Clancy. John Wilhelmi and John 
Mayer, both full time Dispatchers and Permanent Intermittent Officers were 
appointed Provisional Officers during the respective leaves. Carol Ann 
Palmieri returned as a Dispatcher. Paul Sicard continued as an Intern from 
Northeastern. Thomas McNiff was appointed Intern also in June. 

In order to get more Reserve Officers to work when Regular Officers 
are not available, the following five persons were appointed Permanent Inter- 
mittent Officers: Thomas McNiff and Ray Burton of Medfield, Robert Hudson of 
Roslindale, Brian Scully of Dedham and Paul Sullo of Canton. Robert Taylor, 
Eileen O'Brien and Michael Riggs were terminated in order to fill the roster 
with active reserves. James Nagle transfered to the Millis Police to accept 
a full time position. 

TRAINING 

All regular officers attended in-service training for one week at the 
South Suburban Police Institute, Foxboro as required by the Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice Training Council. Items included: firearms, motor vehicle 
laws, new law update, and CPR. 

Officers Bertone, Naughton, Mayer, Grover, Wilhelmi and McNiff were 
trained as intoxilizer operators. Dispatchers Palmieri and Rioux and all 
officers have been trained in suicide prevention. Several Officers attended 
one day seminars in various police subjects. Several were trained on the 
use of LoJack. 

EQUIPMENT 

We received two new cruisers in 1986 and traded in two 1984 cars. We 
received a LoJack unit for one of our cruisers which will be able to track 
stolen cars. Our intoxilizer was received at a cost of $3,900 of which 
$3,000 was reimbursed by the Governor's Highway Safety Committee. The CMI 
5000 Intoxilizer is a computerized breath testing machine used on arrested 
persons charged with operating under the influence of liquor. It replaces 
the older breathalyzer that we have been using for several years that is 
now obsolete. 

44 




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45 



We had a failure of our traffic lights at routes 109 and 27 for several 
weeks and I will again request funds to replace the electro-mechanical con- 
trols with solid state controls. It is very hard to get parts for the 
present controller which was installed in 1975. 

I have requested funds to add a computer to the department to keep up 
with the sophistication needed to keep records and aid in crime solving and 
administrative work. 

A new radar was received in December when a popular model went on sale 
for $658.95. The money was transferred from the reserve account by the 
Warrant Committee with the support of the Board of Selectmen. We will now 
be able to have a radar in service when our other unit breaks down. Our 
older one was out of service for about seven weeks this year. We will also 
be able to use two at once from time to time. 

I have requested three new cruisers in the capital budget replacing two 
1985 cars and a 1980 unmarked car. My request includes keeping the 1980 car 
to use as transportation myself as well as a car for surveillance, radar and 
as a general back-up vehicle. 

Radios that were ordered to replace our radio system have been received 
and should be installed soon. 

The suicide prevention law passed in 1984 required the installation of 
plastic covering on cell bars as well as a fifteen minute check on all 
prisoners locked up. We have had the plastic installed, but in order to 
check the cells every fifteen minutes, we will have to have a person stay in 
the cell area all the time that anybody is locked up. This is another case 
of stupidity by our legislature. We already have video and audio to watch 
the detainees. The monies will have to be paid by the state as it is man- 
dated by the law. 

GENERAL 

We had less crime reported generally in 1986 but we had a murder in 
February. The District Attorney's Office responded as required by law but 
was unable to solve the case yet. Detective Garvey, Officer Naughton, other 
officers and myself have put many hours on the case to no avail. Detective 
Garvey continues to work on it weekly. 

We received reports of our usual rash of vandalism to cars and mail- 
boxes. We also had several thefts of vehicle number plates and hubcaps. 

We received many complaints of speeding at many locations in town and 
tried, with limited personnel, to run more radar at more locations. We will 
be able to do more with the additional radar and if the Town Meeting adds 
the new officers and cruiser I'm requesting. We did issue 755 citations as 
compared to 461 in 1985. We received $17,220 from Dedham court in fines. 

Town Meeting took a large step in traffic safety by voting to improve 
South Street extension. I hope it will continue by adding sidewalks each 
year on narrow streets. 

The Auxilliary Police Department assisted us many times, most notably, 
Memorial Day, Medfield Day, Fourth of July, Halloween, December Christmas 
parade and Belmont race in October. They are a big help to me and to the 
townspeople. Thank you to Vincent Cellucci and his squad. 



46 



Thank you also to Sgt . Pat Clancy and Officer Thomas LaPlante for their 
service on the department. Pat became a Police officer early in 1970 and 
was drafted into the Army later in the year. Following his return from the 
military and subsequent employment in private industry he was reinstated as 
police officer in 1975. He was promoted to Sergeant in 1980. More recently 
he had served as Training officer and on the Board of Directors at the 
Police Academy. 

Tom worked for the DPW in Medfield from 1974 and worked part-time for 
the Police Department until he was appointed full time in April 1983. 



year 



Thank you to all Town Departments for their assistance throughout the 



Respectfully submitted, 

WiLLLam H. Mann 
POLICE CHIEF 




TOWN CLERK ADMINISTERS OATH TO NEW 
PERMANENT INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS 



47 



STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1986 ARE AS FOLLOWS : 

Accidents reported 235 

Personal Injuries 26 

Pedestrian 3 

Fatalities 

Hit and Run 46 

Bicycles 2 

Ambulance Trips 292 

Arrests 178 

Arson 5 

Assistance to Citizens 286 

To other Departments 321 

Stranded people 50 

Lockouts 251 

Escorts 295 

Automobiles 

Reported stolen 8 

Stolen Vehicles recovered 3 

Citations issued 755 

Breaking and Entering 41 

Attempted 7 

Burglar Alarms answered 738 

Bomb Scares 

Civil matters and Family Problems 46 

Closed Homes Checked 122 

Court Attendance 117 

Disturbances 13 

Emergency Calls 166 

Fires Responded by Police 105 

Doors Found Unlocked or Open 214 

Window Found Unlocked or Open 17 

Persons Held in Protective Custody 23 

Funeral Escorts 47 

Investigations of Miscellaneous Complaints 1,194 
Larceny 

Under $100.00 91 

Over $100.00 62 

Bicycles 18 

Motor Vehicles 8 

Shoplifting 9 

Attempted Larceny 9 

Lost Children Reported 6 

Lost Children Found by Police 7 

Malicious Destruction of Property 224 

Mischievous Acts HO 

Missing Persons from State Hospital 57 

Missing Patients located by Police 13 

Missing Persons Reported 21 

Missing Persons Located 3 

Messages Delivered 31 
Permits Issued 

Gunsmith 

Amunition 2 

Firearms Dealers 2 

Firearms ID Card 54 

Pistol Permits 66 

Bicycle Registration 58 



48 



Stolen Bicycle Recovered 3 

Power Failure 23 

Sudden Deaths Investigated 5 

Summons Served 12 

Suspicious Vehicles 137 

Suspicious Persons 95 

Suspicious or Annoying Calls 50 

Injured Adults 8 

Injured Children 8 

Assaults 9 

Wires Down 15 

False Alarms 2 

Suicide and Attempted Suicides 1 

Committments 

Accostings 2 

Indecent Exposure 1 

Rape 

Attempted Rape 



49 



AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my annual report for the ambulance for the year ending 
December 31, 1986. 

The ambulance was manned by about 23 EMTs throughout the year and 
logged 292 trips. We responded to other towns for mutual aid 4 times to 
Dover. We received mutual aid 27 times from: 

Millis - 23 

Dover - 3 

Walpole - 1 

Trips Cancelled - 20 

Medfield State Hospital - 26 

Receipts received were $20,157.16 

Ambulance maintenance included rebuilding the electrical system in 
March, rebuilding the radiator in August and partial manifold system in 
August. 

I have projected replacement of this vehicle in FY88 and have requested 
money from the capital budget to replace the chassis or the entire ambulance, 

Each year, some EMTs withdraw from participation of ambulance duty and 
new ones come on, keeping the number of EMTs between 15 and 22, in varying 
degrees of involvement. 

This year I am recommending a stipend be paid to the EMTs based on the 
number of shifts they cover and number of years they remain, to encourage 
more people to work longer and more often on the ambulance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WWLLam H. Mann 
POLICE CHIEF 



50 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Civil Defense Director for the year 
ending December 31, 1986. 

The Civil Defense Director's responsibilities are to act as a liaison 
between the Selectmen and the Town Departments in the event of a state de- 
clared emergency. The Civil Defense Director is also in charge of the Aux- 
iliary Police under the Chief of Police. 

In addition to our compulsory drills on July 4th and Halloween, our 
Auxiliary Police and Radio Operators were again requested to assist in the 
following events: 

Memorial Day 

June 1986 Road Race 

- Search and Rescue assistance to Walpole for lost boy 

- Medfield Day 

- Dedham Bicentennial Road Race 
Christmas Parade 

Fortunately, as a result of a mild winter and inactive hurricane 
season, the department was not called upon to provide emergency assistance 
during 1986. Emergency vehicles and equipment have been maintained and are 
ready for use when needed. 

I wish to remind the people of Medfield that it may be possible to 
arrange for showers at one of the schools during emergencies. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the Auxiliary Police for 
their cooperation throughout the year. Also, I wish to thank the Board of 
Selectmen, Michael Sullivan and his staff, and Police Chief Mann. A 
special thanks to Fire Chief Ryan for allowing us the use of his quarters 
for our EOC room and to Ken Feeney and the Highway Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VsLncznt M. C&Ltucci, 
CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 



51 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report as Animal Control Officer for the year ending 
December 31, 1986. 

The year 1986 saw changes. A new van was acquired, formerly used by 
the Council of Aging. 

Two new assistants, Carla Mahaney and Ken Burd, were appointed. These 
appointments again brought the number to three in the Animal Control Office. 

We had more horse calls this year than we ever had. 

Compliance with the leach law was better, though far from perfect. We 
hope to see improvement each year,. 

Our thanks to Chief Mann and the Medfield Police, without whose 
assistance and support we would not function. The men of the Highway Depart- 
ment also have our thanks for assistance given throughout this past year. 

Medfield residents who have made donations for our strays, have our 
unending gratitude. 

Multi dog or kennel license 17 

Individual dogs licensed 1,056 

Dogs killed by cars 13 

Cats killed by cars 34 

Bites or scratches reported to our office 15 

Citations 114 

Strays adopted 9 

Animal related calls 1,089 

Respectfully submitted, 

LouXie G. Papado yAjinvuA 

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



52 




SBPlIP 




53 



THE ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Animal Inspection report for 1986. 

Animals were quarantined following the report of dog bites when the 
owner of the dog could be located. All dogs were found to be free of rabies. 
The number of bites per year continues to decline due to Medfield 's strict 
leash law and the diligent work of its Animal Control Officer and assistants. 

All animals and their shelters comply with the health code for each. 
All animals were found free of disease and in excellent care. Medfield has 
29 horses, 6 ponies, 1 donkey, 13 sheep, 10 beef cattle and assorted 
chickens, water fowl and rabbits. 

As usual, I had a care-free year as Animal Inspector. Medfield con- 
tinues to enjoy its reputation as a town that cares for its animals and I am 
proud to serve in the capacity of Animal Inspector. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Katzn MacGfL&goi 
ANIMAL INSPECTOR 

iMilbuA M. SaJUeA, P.l/.M. 
ASSISTANT ANIMAL INSPECTOR 




NORTH STREET c. 1910 

Photo of painting by Walter Frank 



54 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board mourned the death this fall of Melville J. Mills, an assessor 
in Medfield for more than 20 years. Mel's expertise in appraising and 
assessing was invaluable during his service to the town and the Board has 
felt the loss of both a colleague and a friend. 

Carol A. Rossi was elected to fill the vacancy at a special meeting of 
the remaining Board Members and Selectmen in November. Mrs. Rossi, a life 
long resident of Medfield, has had experience in the real estate field and 
we welcome her as an enthusiastic addition to the Board. 

Although the real estate market stabilized slightly in 1986, the lower 
interest rates and the increased value of land resulted in new subdivisions 
and home construction which kept our real estate appraiser busy. The de- 
crease in interest rates also resulted in refinancing of many home mortgages 
causing additional inquiries from homeowners and appraisers. This increased 
activity necessitated a new policy limiting the number of property record 
cards available upon request and fees for copies. 

This year the Board awarded the contract for updating the assessors' 
maps to Performance Concepts, Inc. The job requires prompt revisions of all 
lot changes, including accurate plotting of subdivisions, zoning changes, 
street numbering, and identification of new construction on the Assessors' 
maps. We were pleased with the service offered by Performance Concepts this 
year and plan to continue with them into 1987. 

Town-wide valuation increased more than $12,600,000 between fiscal '86 
and fiscal '87 with the net result an increase of available new growth to be 
used to offset the tax rate. Thus, in spite of the additional appropriations 
at town meeting, the new tax rate jumped no more than $.25 over last year's: 
$14.60 in fiscal '86 to $14.85 for fiscal '87. 

In a landmark court case, the Board challenged a concept that a conser- 
vation easement could be placed on residential buildings as well as land, as 
recently deeded to the Trustees of Reservations. Although the town won the 
case heard before the Appellate Tax Board and in the first hearing before 
the Supreme Judicial Court, a request for a rehearing initiated by conser- 
vation groups resulted in reversal of the first decisions. The Board was 
cited as an opponent of conservation, however, it questioned only the 
method by which such easement was granted to the Trustees, endeavoring to 
protect the rights of Medfield taxpayers who must make up the difference 
when land is removed from the tax roll and placed in exempt status. 

Once again, in calendar year 1987 we begin the preparations for a 
complete revaluation for 1989 and, although this is a triennial program, the 
work of property inspections and sales analyses continues in the interim 
years to satisfy state requirements. 



55 



We thank our able staff, C.B. Doub and Marjorie Temple, and our 
appraiser, Stan Bergeron, for their superlative work over the years. Our 
town truly is fortunate to have the benefit of their work for this is what 
makes our system of "voluntary" government possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SuAan N. Tkon.nton, Chairman 
WMJUam V. WaJUh, Clerk 
CaAol A. Rot>i»l 




MELVILLE J. MILLS 



56 



THE WATER & SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Water and Sewerage Board continues to be presented with significant 
residential and garden-type or cluster zoned apartment and commercial office 
projects, some of which languish and some of which are moving forward to 
completion. 

Notable are: 

1. Castle Hill-Deerf ield Drive-Marholin 

2. Ledgewood acres 

3. Greater Heights Realty Trust 

4. Georgetown Estates 

5. Medfield Technology Park 

After Town Meeting approval, the Board moved forward with the cleaning 
of the street main on Bridge Street for the purpose of clearing up long 
standing water discoloration in the area. 

Current areas of concern include a potential summer capacity problem 
created by the Medfield State Hospital, which shut down its water pumping 
station temporarily. The hospital is now relying on the Town for approx- 
imately 300,000 gallons of water per day during the intermim while recondi- 
tioning operations are underway. It is important to note that the State has 
a serious water system loss and unaccounted for on the hospital property. 
On average, during this time, Medfield supplies more than 300,000 gallons of 
water per day, while receiving at the Waste Water Treatment Plant, only 
100,000 gallons per day. 

The continued hospitalization of long time member, John D. Williams, has 
dictated a change in his appointment from active to associate status and the 
return to voting status of Mr. Beverage. At mid-year John Rose, Jr. resigned, 
having moved to Millis. The departure of Mr. Rose left a vacancy, which was 
filled by the appointment of Mr. Thomas F. Williams for a 3 year term. Sub- 
sequently Mr. Beverage was elected Chairman. 

At the location of a future well site on State Hospital property, the 
Board has noted a problem with a 400 foot buffer radius which is necessary. 
The problem has been made known to adjoining property owners and at the 
present time, current owners indicate a favorable arrangement can be worked 
out. 

The Waste Water Treatment Plant is also considering modifying the flow 
pattern in the primary tanks to allow more dwell time to handle growth in 
waste water and septage treatment requirements. 

During the year, 68 new services were connected, compared to 40 in 1985 
and 56 in 1984. Pumpage was 412,422,000 gallons compared to 367,758,000 
gallons in 1985. Some distortion should be noted, due to the shutdown of the 
Hospital pumping station late in the year. 



57 



In conclusion, the Board would like to express its appreciation for the 
continued dedication and hard work of its departmental employees. We look 
forward to continued cooperation from all departments. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LdLand V. BeveAage, Chairman 

Ha/uty C. Wwiow 

ThomaA F. WWLlamt> 

John V. WWLl<mi>, Associate Member 




SCENIC VIEW ON PHILIP STREET 



58 



TREE AND INSECT PEST CONTROL 

DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 1986. 

General maintenance of the town trees was carried out during the 
past year as workers were available. This consisted of removing low limbs 
and clearing for visibility. Over 48 dead and dangerous trees were removed. 

The Dutch Elm Disease is still present. We lost a few large elms this 
year. 

No spraying was done for the Gypsy Moths this year as there were very 
few. We will have to keep a close watch for next year. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying done on their 
property, notice must be given no later than March 1 to the town clerk by 
registered mail. Notice must be given each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Malcolm J. G-lb^on 

Tree Warden 

Superintendent of Insect Pest Control 



59 



NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO 
CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Operational Project Program integrates all proven technologies into 
a system of mosquito control that is rational, safe, effective and economic- 
ally feasible. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch and to sustain larval growth. 

Source Reduction Work: Our primary efforts are concentrated on the 
drainage of shallow, standing, stagnant water and the maintenance of exist- 
ing flow systems which contribute to mosquito breeding sources. 

Drainage ditches cleaned 1,543 feet 

Brush obstructing drainage cut 90 feet 

Larviciding: Treatment of mosquito larvae during adquatic development 
is the next most effective control effort. 

Larvicide by backpack and mistblowers 165 acres 

Catch basin larvicide application 304 count 

Adulticiding: The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes 
necessary when they are numerous, annoying or threatening to residents. 

Adulticide with mistblowers 67 acres 

Adulticide U.L.V. from trucks 16,064 acres 

Surveys, inspections and monitoring in support of our programs include 
locating and mapping breeding areas, larval and adult collections and field- 
work evaluations leading to better drainage. 

The Project received 62 calls from residents for information and 
assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jokn J. Smith, 
Superintendent 



60 



THE PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1986 was a challenging year for the Planning Board. Its schedule was 
kept busy with twenty public hearings for subdivision plans, site plans, 
scenic roads, revision of the Land Subdivision Rules &_ Regulations , changes 
in the Zoning Bylaw and the Zoning Map . The Board has experienced the be- 
ginning phase of the development of difficult and marginal sites in the town. 
The continued successes in the market place suggest that pressure for com- 
mercial and residential growth and change will persist in Medfield. 

The following describes in some detail the activities of the Board dur- 
ing 1986: 

TOWN MEETING ACTIONS : 

The 1986 Annual Town Meeting approved an amendment to the Zoning Bylaw 
to require that licensed day care facilities for more than six children be 
allowed by Special Permit of the Board of Appeals. A parking requirement 
was also added to the Zoning Bylaw for licensed day care facilities. An 
article was passed clarifying the definition of a lot, requiring that 
primary access to the lot be able to be provided through the lot's frontage. 
An article allowing unpermitted signs by special permit instead of variance 
and the reduction of the size of the Sign Advisory Board to five members was 
approved. An article permitting more than one building per lot for multi- 
family residential developments in the RU Zone was passed. 

Town meeting passed an article submitted by petition to rezone an RS 
parcel of land across North Meadows Road to RU. The Planning Board did not 
support this rezoning. 

RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISIONS : 

The Planning Board has approved (1) Sheep Farm Subdivision Plan (Shep- 
herd Lane) a one-lot subdivision off Kaymark Drive; (2) Indian Acres Sub- 
division (Wheelwright Road) 12-lot subdivision off North Street; (3) George- 
town Estates Subdivision (Copperwood Road and Bishop Lane) 12-lot subdivision 
off Hospital Road; (4) Dutton Park off High Street at Walpole line contain- 
ing no lots; (5) Town's first cluster subdivision Castle Hills Estates II 
(continuation of Deerf ield Drive) , 4 building lots and 2 lots totalling ap- 
proximately 9 acres to be deeded to the Town; (6) Pondview II (Butterfield 
Lane) off Stuart Street, containing one lot in Medfield; (7) Village Farm 
Estates (Village Drive) off Hospital Road containing 7 lots. 

The Planning Board denied the Tocci-Tocci subdivision extending from 
Pheasant Lane to Hickory Drive as there was not adequate reserve capacity 
in the public drainage system to accommodate this subdivision. The Ledge- 
wood Acres subdivision off Pine Street and Tamarack Road, showing 54 lots 
on 62 acres of land, is being considered and action is expected to be taken 
in early 1987. 

In addition to the above definitive plans, the Board received and re- 

61 



viewed preliminary plans for Pondview II, Rocky Acres, Village Farm and 
Orchard Park Subdivisions. A preliminary plan for a multifamily condominium 
complex off North Meadows Road was received and reviewed. 

The Board held a Site Plan hearing for 14 condominium units on West 
Street. The site plan was approved and the condominiums have been construct- 
ed and occupied. A site plan for a three-family on Main Street, opposite 
Brook Street, was disapproved as the driveway did not meet zoning require- 
ments. 

Twenty-two lots were released for building - five on Nauset Street; one 
on Shepherd Lane; four on Village Farm Estates and twelve lots in George- 
town Estates were released. Two lots on Castle Hill Estates II were re- 
leased to the Town for dedicated open space. 

Twenty-three plans under Subdivision Control not Required were reviewed 
and signed by the Board. 

INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT : 

The Board approved an industrial subdivision plan entitled "Medfield 
Technology Park." This is an industrial subdivision containing one lot to 
be divided in accordance with the needs of industries to locate in the sub- 
division. 

The Planning Board reviewed and approved the following commercial and 
and industrial site plans: 

1. Yer & Keleher, warehouse, West Mill Street. 

2. Bullard's Market and Shops at North and Green Streets. 

3. Jackson Fabrics Shops and Offices on the corner of North and 
Frairy Streets. 

The Planning Board approved parking plans as follows: 

1. Floyd & Glenn, Adams Street 

2. A.H. Harris, West Mill Street 

3. Greater Heights, Main Street 

4. A.J. Lane building on North Meadows Road 

SCENIC ROAD HEARINGS : 

The Board held three scenic road hearings for the removal of dead or 
small trees on Causeway Street, Pine Street, Noon Hill Street and Orchard 
Street. The tree cuttings in most cases were requested by the Tree Warden. 
The stone walls will be replaced after the construction requiring their re- 
moval has been completed. 

LAND SUBDIVISION RULES & REGULATIONS : 

The Planning Board has been working on the revision of the Land Sub- 
division Rules & Regulations over the past several years. This year the 
final review was undertaken and a public hearing was held. The reorganized 
and revised Land Subdivision Rules Sl_ Regulations were adopted. The entire 
document is on a computer and future revisions and reprinting will be easily 
accomplished. The Board would like to thank Kenneth Feeney, Superintendent 
of Streets, and Roy Boudette for the many hours they spent with the Board 

62 



working on the regulations. 

PLANNING BOARD APPOINTMENTS TO MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE : 

The following appointments were made to the MPIC during 1986: 

Marion L. Polzella, David G. Strimaitis, Daniel Jones, Jr., Newton Thompson 
and Martha Smick. It is anticipated that the MPIC will work with the Open 
Space Planning Committee to assist with the studies being made as a result 
of the Bay Circuit Green Belt Grant received by the Town. 

OTHER BUSINESS : 

The Board members were sorry to lose the able services of Daniel W. Nye, 
who served a five-year term. The Board welcomed newly elected member, 
Joseph D. Codispoti. 

The Board has continued to use the engineering services of Whitman & 
Howard for subdivision and site plan reviews and inspections. 

The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assis- 
tance of other Town Boards and Departments during the year, with special 
thanks to Town Counsel Charles Fuller, Zoning Enforcing Officer John 0' Toole, 
Superintendent of Streets Kenneth Feeney and Highway Foreman Robert Kennedy, 
for their cooperation. 

Planning Board meetings are held weekly on Mondays at 8:00 p.m. at the 
Town House and are open to the public. Appointments with the Board must be 
made by the Thursday noon prior to the meeting. Requests for information or 
appointments should be directed to the Planning Administrator, Mildred E. 
Willis, at the Town House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JoAZpk R. PaAkOA, 3H.. , Chairman 
UoA.gaA.2X. E. BcLVlCAO&t, Vice Chairman 
John. K. Gagtlanl, Secretary 
ScOti>^loZd P. Bsmnnan 
Joizpk V. Codiipotl 

MEDFIELD PLANNING BOARD 



63 



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65 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 1986 the Sign Advisory Board has continued to review all appli- 
cations for sign permits as well as continue its policy of advising and 
assisting applicants on questions pertaining to signage. 

The 1986 Annual Town Meeting passed some changes to the sign bylaw which 
will be helpful to the advisory board, the most important of which is the 
change to allow a five-person Sign Advisory Board. 

The Sign Advisory Board has brought any violations of the Sign Bylaw 
which they have observed to the attention of the Zoning Enforcing Officer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hutdn K. W&ineAt, Chairman 
Jutln AJLcu>i>o 
Pkltlp Bonanno 
3oi><ipk V. CodL&poti 
ZickcUid Moon 




PLANNING BOARD MEETS WITH FORMER MEMBERS 



66 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 1986 the Appeals Board conducted thirty public hearings and made 
decisions on the following applications for variances, special permits and 
other appeals: 

GRANTED: First special permit for cluster development. 

Three special permits to work within the Watershed Protection 
District . 

Two variances from height requirements for two church steeples. 

Special permit for medical offices. 

Special permit and variance for alteration of a two-family house. 

Variance from 150-foot buffer requirement. 

Special permit/variance to enlarge garage. 

Two special permits for enlargement of industrial plants. 

Special permit to construct warehouse. 

Five lot line variances granted. 

Variance to allow swimming pool within rear lot line setback. 

Special permit for home occupation. 

DENIED: Two special permits for construction/storage trailers. 
Variance for lot with no frontage on public way. 
Special permit for day-care center parking. 
Variance/special permit for used car lot. 
Variance for undersized lot. 



UPHELD : 



Selectmen's decision on Earth Removal, 



The applicants withdrew a request to change a two-family house to a 
three-family and a request for a carnival. 

During this past year the Board lost a valued colleague when Associate 
Member Harry Kelleher resigned because of his family's move to Florida. The 
Board wishes to thank Mr. Kelleher not only for his aid and assistance to the 
Board during his tenure as an Associate Member but also because of his many 
years of distinguished public service to the Town of Medfield. His advice 
and counsel will be missed. 



67 



The Board is indeed fortunate, however, that Bernard J. Monbouquette 
has accepted an invitation to become an Associate Member of the Board re- 
placing Mr. Kelleher. The Board welcomes Mr. Monbouquette and looks forward 
to working with him in the year ahead. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RoboAt F. Sylvia, Chairman 

BuAg&5-6 P. Standlzy, Secretary 

RaLpk C. Good, J/i. , Member 

Sa.ndft.Cl G. MtMACy, Associate 

ChaAtzA H. Peck, Associate 

Be/inaAd J. Monbou.qu.2JXe., Associate 

H(Wiy A. KeLt&hoA, Associate (resigned) 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my annual report for the year ending December 31, 1986. 

All retail stores, gas stations, pharmacies, supermarkets, deli's, and 
bakery stores in Medfield were checked by the Sealer. All scales and pumps 
that meet the state codes were sealed. Also gas prices, unit pricing, 
rectal and oral thermometers were checked. 

A total of thirty-seven scales, ten avoirdupois, forty-eight apothecary 
weights, two liquid measuring meters, fifty-four gasoline pumps and five 
linear measures were sealed. 

Total inspection fees for this year totaled $2,708. 

I wish to thank town officials for their assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VaXxlcJjx A. Rloux 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



68 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Trustees of the Memorial Public Library is pleased to sub- 
mit its report on the 1986 year. Although financial constraints continue to 
challenge the trustees, the library director, and library personnel, once 
again we have had a rewarding year. 

A major focus throughout 1986 was examination and assessment of our 
library in the light of various studies of small libraries. Areas of con- 
centration identified by the Board were: information and adult independent 
learning, children's reading and viewing, and young adult reading and view- 
ing. Consequently, Mrs. Archer applied for a grant which, if successful, 
would award funds for a much needed enrichment of the non-fiction collection. 
Because Medfield 's amount spent for library aquisition of books continues to 
be low in comparison to other cities and towns with similar revenue raising 
ability within Massachusetts, the Board continues to seek additional support 
in this area. 

In other respects, however, the trustees feel our library cannot be 
bettered. We refer to the exceptional qualities of Mrs. Jane Archer, Library 
Director, Connie Jones, Children's Services and the support staff. These 
individuals consistently provide the citizens of Medfield with courteous, 
effective service, in a welcoming and pleasant atmosphere. 

Mrs. Archer continues to take part in workshops and developmental 
studies. She has been appointed to a State Committee to draw up standards 
for children's library services in Massachusetts. 

Automation services at the library are off to a good start. After 1985 
Town Meeting approved the initial monies to pay for access to the Minuteman 
Data Base, plans became reality. A computer terminal was installed in 
September, affording us dial-up access. Additional funds are needed for 
full membership. 

Other improvements requiring funding are: an alarm system to help 
prevent break- ins like the burglary which occurred in September, a new 
emergency light, and a library-community out-door bulletin board. 

Additional highlights of the year include the hiring of the reference 
librarian, Grace Mosula, for Saturdays, ongoing plans for the park adjoining 
the library, and the considerable success of Connie Jones' special pro- 
grams for children. 

Changes in the Board of Trustees came about through Patricia Kallio's 
retirement in March, and Betty Martin's resignation in January. New 
Board members are Richard Fitzpatrick and Barbara Stevenson. 



69 



We recognize and appreciate the significant support the library re- 
ceives from the Friends of the Library, as well as the Lions Club, Medfield 
Council on the Arts, local businesses, and individual townspeople. The 
library sustains its community role as educator, meeting and arts center, 
and adjunct to the schools through the dedication of its staff and Medfield 's 
citizens. Thank you. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SuACM VdAkoA, Chairman 
GKoX.ch.zvi Chltdi> 
Ma/UJLyn Connor 
HickaAd ViXzpaXKlck 
ULchcLoZ HowaJtd 
BoAbciA Sto.vo.vu> on 



■■IIIr 



ER00M 




LIBRARY DIRECTOR ARCHER DEMONSTRATES COMPUTER SYSTEM 
TO SELECTMAN THOMPSON & LIBRARY TRUSTEE PARKER 



70 



THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

A number of improvements in the quality of library service took place in 
1986, the most important of which was the installation of a computer terminal 
at the main desk which is linked electronically to the collections of 20 area 
libraries. It is now possible to find out which library has a particular 
book not owned in Medfield, and our local terminal will also show if the item 
is on the shelf or checked out. In essence, this capability provides access 
to over \% million unique titles owned within our geographic area. 

Another improvement was the addition of a professional reference 
librarian to our staff to provide specialized service on Saturdays when the 
regular staff is not on duty and during some evening hours. The hours open 
to the public expanded in July when additional funding made it possible to 
open the library at 10 instead of 10:30 a.m. The current hours are Monday 
through Thursday 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. and Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 
5 p.m. The 10 a.m. opening is a resumption of hours cut during Proposition 

The non-fiction collection has been upgraded significantly during the 
year thanks to additional money approved at Town Meeting. Also, the business 
reference collection was expanded to meet needs expressed by many townspeople, 
"Standard & Poor's" business reference sources were added as well as a sub- 
scription to "Value Line Investment Service" and "Banker and Tradesman". 

Many interesting programs were held throughout the year in the library's 
meeting room. Local author and professor, Lynda Moore, spoke on her latest 
book, "Not as Far as You Think", Representative Andrew Natsios presented a 
slide show of his trip to the Soviet Union, a stenciling workshop was held, 
and a slide show of a windjammer trip was given. Many local groups also used 
the meeting room for their own programs, and throughout the year, exhibits of 
local art work graced the walls of the meeting room. 

The Children's Room has been a busy place, with an increase in the 
numbers of patrons visiting and enjoying this vital part of the Library. 
During the summer, children participated in a "Summer Sleuth" program spon- 
sored by WBZ TV, which encouraged library exploration. Summer activities in- 
cluded films, the traditional Chalk-In, a Ramona Quimby look-a-like read-a- 
thon, and sculpture craft. A story hour for 3^-5 year olds was reinstated 
in the fall, and extra sessions of Toddler Time were added to meet increasing 
demands for activity for infants through age three. Visits to the Children's 
Room were made by nursery schools, daycare centers, and girl and boy scout 
troops. Special programming included performances made possible by a grant 
from the Medfield Arts Council, and a magic show by talented 10th grade 
magicians Jesse Jacobs and Ed Kim, who charmed a crowd of almost 100 one warm 
summer day. 

Under the able leadership of Lucy 0' Flaherty, The Friends of the Library 
continue to play a vital role in the provision of library services. Their 
fundraising efforts made it possible to underwrite a portion of the cost of 
the computer link-up, present a graduation Scholarship, and fund the Welcome 

71 



to the Library letter sent to parents of new babies. The Friends sponsored 
a number of programs throughout the year and held their most successful Book 
Sale ever on Medfield Day. Membership in the Friends doubled during the year 
with income from dues totalling over $800. The Friends were also active in 
children's programming this year. Co-ordinators , Maura McNicholas and Pamela 
Kell, offered craft work shops for Valentine's Day, May Day, Halloween and 
Christmas . 

It must be noted with sadness that Barbara Friend, the former Assistant 
Librarian, passed away this year. Contributions in her memory were made to 
the library. 

Again, as in past years, sincere thanks must be offered to the many 
residents and town organizations who have supported the library with book 
donations, monetary contributions, and volunteer time. Each one of you adds 
significantly to the special quality our library possesses. My personal 
thanks also must be expressed to the Library Trustees who continually strive 
to improve the quality of service and make my job easier because of their 
support. And to my staff, I offer my heartfelt appreciation for a job well 
done. They always are willing to give 110%. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Library Director 

STATISTICS FOR 1986 

Total number of materials owned 31,914 

Total materials circulated 76,333 

New books purchased 1,656 

New borrowers registered 1,008 



72 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission submits herewith its fourteenth 
Annual Report for the calendar year 1986. 

The Medfield Historical Commission, appointed by the Board of Selectmen, 
is a legislated body mandated under state law. The primary duty of the 
Commission is to oversee the preservation, conservation, and restoration of 
all properties of historic significance. 

Activities of the Historical Commission included: 

1 . House Inventory Program 

This program continues to be an ongoing effort to create a detailed 
record of the historical properties in Medfield. The Commission maintains 
on file and continues to update this listing of historical properties. 

2. The Historic Signs Program 

This program researches applications of individuals with historic- 
ally significant property. Once verified, signs noting the original owner, 
the date of the property, and often the original owner's occupations, are 
prepared on a cost basis for display on the outside of the property. This 
program has become quite popular with numerous individuals requesting ap- 
plications at the Commission's booth during Medfield Day. 

3. Historic Trail Brochure 

This Historic Trail Brochures continue to be available to the 
public. The brochure is a walking tour and guide to the architectural 
heritage of the town center. The brochure takes you from the 17th century 
English Yeoman style Peak House to the 19th century Queen Anne, Eliza Thayer 
block. It points out Colonial, Federal, Greek Revival, Victorian, and High 
Victorian Italianate style structures. Most of the properties are private 
residences and are not open to the public. Also, Sunday Services are still 
held in each of the churches on the tour. Copies of the brochure are avail- 
able free of charge at the Town House, the Memorial Public Library, and at 
the Commission's booth during Medfield Day. They are also used by classes 
in the Wheelock, Junior and Senior High Schools. 

4. Preservation Award Program 

John and Joanne Hooper were awarded the 1986 Medfield Historic Pre- 
servation Award, honoring their efforts for the restoration and preservation 
of the George Inness House, 406 Main Street, Medfield. The award was pre- 
sented to the Hoopers at a Board of Selectmen's meeting. 

5. Restoration of Town Records Program 

Many of the town records are in need of preservation within acid- 

73 



free, archival-style boxes. The Commission has purchased these boxes from 
funds received via Town Meeting and has started encasing the volumes of town 
records in these. 

6. Historic Slide Program 

The Commission's slide program on the History of Medfield continues 
to be made available to the public. The 150-slide presentation shows the 
history of the town from 1649 to the present and is available to any in- 
dividual, group, or organization in the town of Medfield. In addition, the 
slide program was shown at the Medfield Public Library, the Medfield Senior 
High School for public viewing and was duplicated and donated to the Medfield 
Public School system. The Commission plans to present the program to the 
public in 1987 at the Medfield Senior High School. 

7. Historic Preservation Reference Materials 

Through its membership in the National Historic Trust, the Com- 
mission is kept aware of all current publications in the field of historic 
preservation. By special arrangement with the Medfield Memorial Public 
Library, all copies of sample items received by the Commission are put on 
deposit with the Library and are available for use by the public. 

8. St. Edward's Park 

The Commission is actively involved in helping to determine the 
future of the old St. Edward's Church lot on Main Street, now vacant. The 
Commission would like to see the property transformed into an Historic Park 
which honors the center of town. 

9. New Historic Slide Program 

The Commission is preparing a slide program, "Medfield Connections- 
Artists-Musicians-Patronesses, 1860-1930", focusing on the prominent American 
artists of the Barbizon and Impressionist schools who painted under the 
guidance of George Inness when he lived in Medfield. Included will be 
artists and musicians who were summer residents of Mrs. Sewall's Boarding 
House on Main Street and the art academy on Spring Street. Any photographs 
for copy or information from townspeople concerning this program will be 
appreciated by the Commission. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RobeAt M. Mannino, 3ft., Chairman 
NancLy Codi&poti, Secretary 
David L. 0u)m, Treasurer 
EldCLYlOH. knQJ> 

Vonald J. McDonald 

Donna. loA.zi,a.n 

Ann S. HuntzoA 

RidkaAd P. VnSoigheA, Associate Member 

Va\)i.d WiZmaAtk, Associate Member 

RobeAt VoZta. SoZva, Associate Member 



74 



THE COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council on Aging currently consists of five members and 
three Associate Members. The Council continues to provide services to ap- 
proximately 1,200 (12%) of Medfield's over 60 population, with the able 
assistance of two part-time employees; Executive Director, Harry Mitchell 
and the Mini-bus driver, Millie Kennedy. The Executive Director is available 
mornings at the Town House office Monday through Friday to assist with the 
Council's medical, maintenance and social programs, as well as to answer 
questions and concerns pertaining to Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, 
legal assistance, fuel assistance, and government surplus food distribution. 
The mini-bus driver schedules transportation daily, Monday through Friday to 
the meal site, semi-weekly trips to local and out-of-town shopping, and as 
needed for the Council's medical and social programs, and for individual 
medical appointments. The Council is represented on the Board of Directors 
of the area agency on aging, Health and Social Services Consortium (HESSCO) , 
by Art Farrar and Mary Downing. 

The most rewarding accomplishment in 1986 is the replacement Mini-bus 
with its larger seating capacity, more convenient access, and wheelchair 
ties. At no cost to the taxpayers, the Mini-bus is the result of success- 
fully obtaining a grant award from the State's Executive Office of Elder 
Affairs, plus a very generous donation by the Friends of Medfield Seniors, 
Inc. Increased use of the bus has increased maintenance costs and increased 
salary costs which is having an impact on our already stringent budget. 

The nutrition program has showed interesting changes with a significant 
increase in home delivered meals due to regulatory shorter hospitalizations 
and an option to receive on-going care in the home. However, there has been 
a marked decrease in the number of hot meals served at the First Baptist 
Church meal site. 

The health maintenance programs continue to be successfully received. 
The arts and crafts program reluctantly has had to be put aside after an 
exhaustive search for an instructor. The council would be pleased to see 
greater participation in the bi-monthly exercise program which is available 
at the Baptist Church site. The on-site weekly group counseling sessions 
for Senior Citizens and their families, sponsored by the Cutler Center 
(Norwood) has been discontinued due to small participation. However, in- 
dividual counseling is available at the Cutler Center in Norwood. 

The monthly newsletter, HOPE , is mailed to 900 Senior households; the 
postage is generously provided by the Friends of Medfield Seniors, Inc. 
The Council sponsors the monthly government food surplus distribution to 
eligible Seniors, and other eligible Medfield residents. 



75 



The Council wishes to thank all the volunteers who have so generously 
contributed their time and efforts to making the Council On Aging programs 
possible, and is most grateful to the Friends of Medfield Seniors for their 
generous support and funding. 

The Council continues to devote its efforts to provide services to 
Medfield' s over 60 population, to strongly support the nutrition program 
and to seek a single drop-in site to accommodate all Medfield Senior 
functions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

AAtkuA L. VahteUi, Chairman 
Many VowyiIyiq, Secretary 
CaAt BieWQA, Treasurer 
Ben KoJibly 
WXJLd.a. N&e.dl& 




HISTORICAL AWARD PRESENTED TO JOHN AND JOANNE HOOPER 
FOR RESTORATION OF FORMER INN IS HOME 



76 



THE COUNCIL ON AGING COORDINATOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

The new Ford Mini Bus arrived on schedule. The first month was full 
of adjustments, but we can see it growing in use and value to our community. 
We now try to set up medical appointments on our way to shopping malls. 

The slogan printed on the new bus was submitted by Dorothy Marshall. 
Her reward for this was lunch at the Wayside Inn with officers of the 
"Friends." Thank you, Dorothy, for your slogan, "The Bus for Us, Medfield 
Seniors. " 

Millie Kennedy and Mary Nyren have completed the First Aid, C.P.R. and 
Awareness programs needed to drive the bus. Reports from users tell us it 
is a joy to ride anywhere in this vehicle. 

For the record, we received State Grants of $29,052., Town funds of 
$4,000. (for Department to purchase the old bus to be used by the Animal 
Control Officer) and $4,302. from the "Friends of Medfield Seniors." This 
totals $37,354. Remember, because of this grant and all the "Friends", our 
taxes did not suffer. 

Whenever possible we continue to apply and seek out grant monies to pro- 
vide more services to our elderly population. 

Our newsletter is kept alive, again because of your contributions to the 
"Friends" organization; for short, we call it F.O.S.I. (Friends of Seniors, 
Inc.) 

Our next and most desired project to keep abreast of our growing pop- 
ulation of people over the age of 60 is to move into a building and make it 
a full time Drop-in-Center . This type of place would help us to coordinate 
any and all activities for Seniors into one meeting area. At present, these 
programs are spread out and during the course of the year we have used 
several buildings without rent fees. Wouldn't it be nice to do everything 
at one location, and be able to offer more? 

Did you know that of the more than 10,300 residents in Medfield there 
are 1,237 of them that are 60 years of age or older? Granted, most people 
from 60 to 70 do not need or want many of these services we provide, but we 
are here just in case. Just think of the impact seniors could have on 
elections, town meeting or any other event if the/ felt the need to join to- 
gether. Don't forget, all of you will be joining this elite group in the 
future. 

We never have enough volunteers throughout the year and yet it is sur- 
prising and gratifying to know that you or your neighbors help us deliver 
food, hot lunches, medicine, provide trips to hospitals and doctors when our 
bus is unavailable, answer phones, make phone calls and visits and fold, 
staple, and address letters and much more. 



77 



Thank you everyone, for your cooperation, donations, parties, and 
prayers - Medfield is for us. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Hcuiny T. HutakdLl 

COORDINATOR 




THE BUS FOR US 



78 



MEDFIELD HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its Annual Report 
for 1986. 

The Medfield Housing Authority is authorized by and operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, 
which is known as the Housing and Urban Renewal Law. The Authority is en- 
tirely funded through the Executive Office of Communities and Development of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; it does not receive any funds from the 
Town's appropriations. In addition, modernization funds have been approved 
and will be implemented in 1987. 

The Medfield Housing Authority is made up of five Commissioners, four 
of whom are elected for a five year term. Their terms are staggered so that 
only one Commissioner is elected each year. The fifth Commissioner is ap- 
pointed by the Governor for a five year term. 

In September, Commissioner Jane N. Kelly's term as the state-appointed 
member of the Authority concluded. Jane had served diligently for ten years. 
She had an important voice in molding the policies of the 1 state-aided public 
housing in Medfield, and her presence on the Authority will be sorely missed. 

In November, Mark O'Connor resigned as an Authority member. The Board 
was fortunate that Ralph "Ken" Maider expressed an interest and on December 
16, 1986, was appointed to fill Mr. O'Connor's vacancy. 

The Executive Director, Marie K. Roberts, P.H.M. , is the Chief Adminis- 
trator of the Authority with the responsibility for all phases of the 
Authority's operation. John P. 0' Toole is responsible for the physical main- 
tenance of Tilden Village. 

The Commissioners and Director have attended workshops and conferences 
throughout the year. Programs are evaluated in order to determine their 
adaptability to the Town of Medfield. Commissioners Denton and Gaines rep- 
resented the Authority on the Massachusetts Housing Partnership Opportunity 
Program and Commissioner Nightingale serves on the Town's Fair Housing 
Committee. 

In October, Tilden Village celebrated its tenth anniversary with a 
party at the Hazel Frank Community Building. The reception was well attended 
by residents, some of whom have resided there since Tilden Village opened. 
In addition, the Board of Selectmen joined the festivities as did other 
"friends of Tilden Village." The Authority acknowledges with thanks the 
cooperation and assistance of other Town Boards, local organizations and the 
entire community. 



79 



Questions pertaining to public housing may be directed to the Executive 
Director, Marie K. Roberts, P.H.M. at her office (359-6454) between 9:00 a.m. 
and Noon, Mondays through Thursdays. The Medfield Housing Authority meets on 
the third Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. in the Office at 30 Pound Street. 
The general public is welcome to attend these meetings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jane, M. Kolty, Chairman 

PoXeA A. Gained, Vice-Chairman 

HickaAd M. Vinton, Treasurer 

V-iane. Hi.Qktin.Qat2., Assistant Treasurer 

Ralph K. Mai-deA, Secretary 



THE ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS 

COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The committee has been inactive this past year and remains organized 
as a standing committee ready to respond if the need should arise. 

Respectfully submitted. 

RoboAt CoulXeA, Vice Chairman 

VauJLine. A. Coubtun 

BzveAly L. HalloweLl, Secretary 

VanioZ E. Hogan 

Btiuno J. Palumbo 

\hlckazJL J. SuLLtvan 

ChAlittin A. Skoop, Chairman 



80 



THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (M.G.L. 131, Section 
40) and Medfield' s Wetlands By-Law the Conservation Commission acts in the 
regulatory role of protector of the environment. Regarding the number of 
public hearings scheduled in 1986, it was a very active year. Any persons 
proposing to fill, remove, dredge or otherwise alter land within 100 feet of 
any wetland were required to file a Notice of Determination or Notice of 
Intent to the Commission and appear at a Public Hearing. The following 
Public Hearings were held in 1986. 



1. E. Lawrie Rhoads - FDC Packaging Co. 
214-78 Warehouse addition - Adams St. 



Approved with Conditions 



2. MN Development - 214-79 Drainage outfall Approved with Conditions 
and culvert replacement North and Harding Sts. 



3. Ronald T. Tocci 214-80 Subdivision between 
Hickory Dr. and Pheasant Rd. 

4. Armand Janjigian 214-81 Engineering land 
for horse pasture, Allen Lane 

5. MBTA 214-82 Maintenance of railroad tracks 
and alteration of culvert 

6. Louis Petrozzi 214-83, Residential 
dwelling, Main St. 

7. Medfield Associates 
Extension of Deerfield Rd. 

8. Harry Forster 214-84, Pond construction, 
Granite St. 

9. LaSalle Realty 214-85, Residential 
dwelling, Grace Dr. 

10. A.J. Lane, Medfield Industrial Park 
Interchange of pavement and landscaping 

11. Louis Petrozzi 214-83 - Residential 
dwelling, Main St. 

12. 420 Corp. - Basile/Tresca, Industrial 
park, West Mill St. 



Denied 

Approved with Conditions 

Approved with Conditions 

Approved with Conditions 

Approved with Conditions 

Approved with Conditions 

Denied 

Approved with Conditions 

Amended Conditions 

Denied 



Conservation land may be acquired by the Town as a tax deductible gift, 
sale or easement. Residents are encouraged to contact the Commission for 
further information. This year the Town received a state grant to help plan 
for open space preservation as part of the Bay Circuit Program (Green Belt) . 



81 



This program involves 50 communities surrounding Boston and has as its goal 
the creation of a system of public and private protected parks ringing Boston. 
The grant is for $7,000 and will be used in conjunction with $5,000 approved 
at last spring's Town Meeting to study drainage in the Town. Commission 
member, Jesse Matuson, has been coordinating this effort with the Planning 
Board's representative, Bay Bancroft. 

The Commission was regretfully informed of the passing away of one of 
its most dedicated members, John Bradstreet, on September 26th. Mr. Brad- 
street served many years on the Commission and for his last five as Treasurer, 

Joining the Commission this past year was Douglas Sparrow, replacing 
Douglas Campbell as a full member. Donna Hicks acted as Secretary for most 
of the year, but had to step down in October, being ably replaced by Betty 
Kaerwer. John Guthrie became an Associate Member, joining Daniel Fritzsche, 
newly appointed as Associate Member. 

An informational meeting took place towards the end of this year. 
Commission member, Douglas Sparrow, spoke on recognition of soil and plant 
characteristics typical of ground water recharge areas and natural water 
storage areas. 

Any interested Medfield resident is cordially invited to attend the 
monthly meetings of the Conservation Commission at the Town House, the first 
Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. Any resident wishing to join the 
Commission is also invited to contact us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lee HoweLl, Chairman 

ZoJUKXhA Monboaqantte., Vice-Chairman 

BoXty KaznweA, Secretary 

Vavyid MoHXlbh, Treasurer 

RobeAt Hin&man 

Jei-ie Mcutu&on 

VouglaA SpaAAou) 

St&pkm E. BaAA&tt, Associate Member 

John BzaZo,, Associate Member 

RlckaAd W. Btiyant, Associate Member 

Va.ni.zJL fKiX.Z6C.kil, Associate Member 

Edmund Hammond, Associate Member 

Han6on C. Robbi.ni>, Associate Member 



82 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The calendar year 1986 again showed continuing growth in the workload 
for the Board of Health agents, staff members and our contracting agencies. 
Our agents and staff found themselves spending more time supplying infor- 
mation and on consulting services. 

SANITATION 

As agent for the Board of Health, John Keefe, RS made 135 inspections 
of food service establishments and retail food stores and gave consultation 
and advice to 36 requests and investigated 10 food related complaints. All 
establishments are inspected at least quarterly. While most establishments 
maintain their operations within the guidelines of the State Sanitary Code, 
it continues to be necessary for our agent to monitor some closer than 
others when non-compliance is a re-occurring problem in order that corrective 
action may be addressed. In addition to food service inspections, Mr. Keefe 
also held consultations in various public health issues with school, high- 
way and fire personnel throughout the year. 

Under the provisions of Chapter II of the State Sanitary Code covering 
minimum standards for human habitation, Mr. Keefe made 28 inspections of 
dwelling units during the year which resulted from complaints and random 
inspections of rental housing. Where violations of the State Sanitary Code 
were found, the owner or occupant was ordered to take corrective action and 
follow-up inspections were made to ensure compliance. Mr. Keefe also made 
141 miscellaneous inspections which included the public bathing beach, semi 
public pools, laundromats, gas stations, shopping centers and the landfill. 
27 regular inspections of school cafeterias and nursery schools were 
carried out throughout the year. Total inspections and consultations during 
1986 were 345. 

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

As the town continues to experience growth and the number of residences 
grow, the load on our environment increases. Recognizing this, the Board 
of Health has been active in cooperation with other boards and committees, 
stressing the need for proper management of the town's natural resources, 
particularly, the protection of our water resources. With this as a 
priority, our agent and consulting professional engineer, William R. Domey , 
has provided engineering assistance to the town residents and reviewed plans 
for future development in subdivision reviews and drainage plans for site 
plan review process. The following is a list of the number of permits and 
related permits: 

New plan reviews 44 

On-site soil tests 72 

Septic system construction permits 21 

Construction inspections 80 

Repair permits issued 5 

Installers' permits issued 22 

83 



Septage handler & carters' permits issued 15 
Swimming pool reviews 12 

Review of plans for additions & renovations 69 

Sewerage complaints and investigations were conducted throughout the 
year and several compliance orders were issued. Approximately 145 site 
visits, 35 conferences and numerous hearings were held to respond to the 620 
requests for Mr. Domey's services during the year. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Karen MacGregor, the town's Animal Inspector since 1980 continues her 
dedicated service. The Board of Health gratefully acknowledges her very 
capable assistance in that position. Her report is contained separately in 
this Town Report. The Board reminds residents of the need for a permit 
issued annually for the keeping of any animals other than household pets. 
Residents are also reminded that all animal bites including those from 
household pets must be reported immediately to the Animal Inspector or the 
Board of Health of the town in which the bite occurs so that the animal may 
be quarantined or if necessary, arrangements made for laboratory examination. 

BOARD OF HEALTH PERMITS ISSUED 

Restaurants, counter bars, cafeteria food service 

and vending machines 15 

Food stores and markets 12 

Temporary food service permits 7 

Catering permits 1 

Bakeries 2 

Laundromats 2 

Funeral directors 1 

Horse, animal, farm and stable permits 19 

Veterinary clinic 1 

Refuse and offal carters 4 



Total 64 

Total permits issued, including disposal works construction permits, 
installers, repairs and septage handlers was 127. 

The total revenue from the issuance of permits and the review of plans 
was $6,180 for the calendar year 1986 compared to $6,012 for 1985. 

CONTRACTS WITH HUMAN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 

The South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens (SNCARC) 
continues in its 33rd year of service to provide a variety of supportive 
services for people who are disabled developmentally and for their families. 
This private nonprofit organization established by local concerned citizens 
with its purpose to promote and advocate for the welfare of citizens who are 
disabled or at risk of being disabled by mental retardation or similar im- 
pairment, provides support services and acts as a supportive community for 
their families. The Association depends heavily upon volunteer, moral and 
funding support and a working partnership with the 12 towns it serves, one 
of which is Medfield. 

The programs extended to its current membership of 450 families and 
friends are as follows: Vocational Training Program which teaches skills 
needed to do gainful and productive work in sheltered or competitive employ- 
ment; Day Habilitation Program, located in Medfield, which teaches self 

84 



care and community living skills; Residential programs which allow in- 
dividuals to live in their own communities and which also includes a program 
for clients who are elderly. A second HUD program in Norwood will open 12 
apartments for clients who have abilities for greater independance. Medfield 
also houses the Early Intervention Program, crucial in the early months of 
a handicapped infant's life. Many additional programs originate from the 
Memorial School in Medfield and citizens of town are encouraged to volun- 
teer in any which includes both social and recreational programs, family 
support systems, information and referral, training programs and emergency 
respite care which enables a family to make use of a trained provider for 
emergencies or as a rest change for a family. 

SNCARC 1986 SERVICE REPORT 

Program Clients Served 

Day Habilitation Program 

(serving the most severly handicapped adults) 1 

Vocational Training Services 

(Norfolk Industrial Services) 8 

Early Intervention Program 

(infants birth to age 3) 12 

Residential Care Programs 2 

Family Support/Rehabilitative 

Therapies /Clinical Services 7 

Respite Care /Emergency Services 14 

Social-recreational /Transportation/ 

Citizen Advocacy Services 7 

Norfolk Mental Health Association, a private non-profit corporation 
governed by a citizen Board of Directors who represent each of the 12 towns 
it serves, including the town of Medfield. 

Major programs of NMHA include Cutler Counseling Center, Project Hire, 
Case-Aide and Parent-Aide Programs and Community Education Programs. Cutler 
Counselling Center serves individuals, couples and families through varied 
services which include evaluation, referral, treatment and educational and 
support groups. Project Hire is a sheltered vocational rehabilitation 
facility for people with emotional, developmental or physical handicaps. 
Case-Aide and Parent Aide Programs offer trained and supervised volunteer 
aides to provide one-to-one help to clients in the community, families and 
individuals in crisis, victims of domestic violence, parents at risk of 
abusing or neglecting their children and isolated elderly. Community 
Education Programs offer speakers for community meeting, workshops, con- 
sultation and educational materials. 

During fiscal year 1986, Cutler Counseling Center provided direct 
services to approximately 71 people from Medfield. The total value of these 
services was $55,860 of which the town of Medfield allocated $5,000. Re- 
ferrals for people who requested assistance came from friends, neighbors or 
family, clergy, school, physicians or community agencies. The most common 
requests for help concerned such problems as depression and anxiety, dif- 
ficulties in marriage or family relations, school or behavior-related pro- 
blems, alcohol or drug abuse, work related problems, and acute or chronic 
mental illness. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

In the five years since the Dover, Medfield, Norfolk Visiting Nurse Associ- 
ation merged with the Walpole VNA,the program to provide public health 
nursing continues to be carried out successfully. 

85 



In 1986, health promotion visits to the chronically ill elderly popula- 
tion increased by $16 following the trend that the elderly population re- 
presents an increasing percentage of the total population and therefore 
public health services such as health promotion visits help these people to 
be able to stay at home and remain as independent as possible. 

Senior Citizen Health Clinics continue to be held on the first Tuesday 
of the month at Wilkens Glen and third Tuesday at Tilden Village. Services 
at the clinics include a physical assessment plus individualized discussion 
of diet and medications. Diabetic screenings are offered every three months 
and a health education topic is presented monthly. During 1986 twenty 
Senior Citizen Health Clinics were held. These services are also available 
to Medfield residents during office hours at Blackburn Hall in Walpole every 
Monday, Tuesday and Friday between 9 and 10 a.m. Cholesterol screening was 
offered at Medfield Day. 

Follow-up of communicable diseases and immunizations continues to be an 
important part of the public health program supplied by VNA. The Maternal 
Child Health program provides visits to newborns and their families. Child- 
birth classes are offered and through a grant from the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Health, infant car seats are available at a rental fee of 
$15.00. The agency's comprehensive home health services include skilled 
nursing, personal car by home health aides; physical, occupational and speech 
therapies, case management and medical social workers. While these services 
are usually reimbursed by third party payers such as Medicare, Medicaid, and 
private health insurance, the Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association con- 
tinues to provide these services to ALL MEDFIELD residents, regardless of 
their ability to pay. 

In 1986 the VNA developed aerobic fitness and back care programs. They 
also began the transition to an in-house computerized management information 
system to more efficiently carry out clinical record-keeping, billing and 
accounting functions. 

The Town of Medfield Public Health Program statistics for 1986 are as 
follows: 

CLINICS 

Senior Citizen Health Clinics 
Choloresterol Screening (Medfield 

Day) 
Flu Clinic 

Office Visits - 79 

Health Promotion visits - 305 

YOUTH OUTREACH 

The Medfield Youth Outreach program administered by the Board of Health 
and the Outreach Advisory Committee continues to be a program supported by 
the town. The Advisory Committee with a membership of a representative of 
the school administration, police chief, school nurse, a citizen-at-large 
and a liaison of the Board of Health meets bi-monthly to review and evaluate 
the Outreach program and to make recommendations to the Board of Health for 
improving or expanding the program. The focus of the Outreach position has 
traditionally been and remains, crisis intervention, short and some long 
term counseling, information and referrals, community and client liaison 
and advocacy. The confidential services are offered free of charge to 
Medfield youth and their families by the Outreach worker. 

86 



SESSIONS 


PATIENTS 


• 20 


426 


1 


68 


1 


170 



664 



Outreach Statistics 

For the calendar year, a total of 92 clients were seen by the Outreach 
Worker and the following statistics relate to type of issues and number of 
clients affected: 



Family related issues 72 

Sexual abuse 11 

General information 2 

Referrals 6 

Alcohol related issues 16 

Other drug related issues 4 

Physical abuse 4 

Parenting issues 12 

Step-parenting issues 7 



Adoption related issues 2 

Suicide 3 

Depression 14 

Divorce 21 

Peer related issues 34 

Diversion 3 

Rent-a-Kid 13 

Emergency housing 2 

Crisis intervention 12 



Clients were referred to the Outreach Worker by the school, self re- 
ferral, Juvenile Diversion, local physicians, local ministers, state 
agencies, private counseling agencies and local clubs and groups. In over 
50% of the cases, parents and other family members were involved in the 
counseling process. 

Committees, groups, school and community outreach 

The Outreach Workers participated in a number of groups on a regular 
basis including: Youth Advisory Committee, Salvation Army Advisory Board, 
Superintendent's Alcohol and Drug Task Force, Mental Health Professionals 
Resource Group and monthly meetings of the Massachusetts Municipal Human 
Service Workers Association. 

The Rent-a-Kid program continues as a full year program out of the Out- 
reach office. At the end of the year there were 13 students registered with 
the program. The Peer Counseling Program in its first year has gotten off 
the ground with support and help of the administration of the School system. 
In accordance with the plan approved by the School Committee, the program 
will focus in four areas: 1) training the students to work one-on-one 
with other high school students providing support, guidance, and help in 
problem solving and resources and referrals for the issues presented; 2) 
students will be trained to work with groups of younger students; particu- 
larly around issues dealing with alcohol and other drugs $ these students 
will be available to go into classrooms to provide information and role 
models for younger students; 3) peer counselors who are interested will be 
trained to provide training for group counseling sessions in the high 
school; 4) interested students will be trained to work in a Big Brother/Big 
Sister capacity to younger students in need. 

The Outreach Worker is responsible for the 15 week training session 
and all the follow-up sessions through the one year program. Twelve high 
school students have been selected as well as four alternates. The group 
will train at the United Church of Christ in order to provide a different 
environment from the school setting. 



87 



Education advancement and snpervision 

Both Nancy and Mary have participated in various workshops and 
seminars in order to continue to keep informed on client issues which may 
need to be addressed. Weekly clinical supervision continued with Alex 
Ringelheim LSW and Mark Blogier MSW from Greater Boston Family Services. 
Supervision assures Medfield clients in the Outreach program the very best 
in services. 

The Board of Health holds its meetings on Tuesday evenings as posted at 
the Town Hall. These meetings are open to the public and citizens are in- 
vited to attend and participate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EdwaAdt J. Toom&y, Chairman 
WWUam TotckzA MD, Clerk 
UqaJL J. Ma.cKenz.te 




SELECTMAN CHAIRMAN LARKIN HONORS RETIRING 
PLANNER DANIEL NYE AND RETIRING HEALTH 
BOARD MEMBER CAROL NYE 



88 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

The following is a breakdown of service and assistance rendered by the 
Medfield veterans and their dependents as authorized by the Commissioner of 
Veterans Services for the period ending December 31, 1986. The assistance 
includes fuel, clothing, food, housing and medical expenses for veterans 
and their families. 

The state reimburses the town seventy-five percent of the benefits. 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

Application for Ordinary Assistance 12 

Benefits Administered 4 

VETERANS' SERVICES 

Hospitalization 2 

Education 3 

Burial Allowance ' 15 

Social Security 17 

Pension Assistance 35 

I wish to thank town officials for their assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul F. CuA/ian 

VETERANS' AGENT 



89 



THE PARK AND RECREATION 
COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Park and Recreation Commission has had another successful year. It 
celebrated its 25th anniversary as a Park and Recreation Commission on 
Sunday, November 30, 1986 at the newly established Hannah Adams Pfaff Com- 
munity Center. The first Chairman of the Commission, Walter Frank and other 
past commissioners were present to receive a plaque honoring the-ir service 
to the citizens of Medfield. The Commission also presented a plaque to all 
the fine sports organizations sponsored by the Commission: 



(a) Little League 

(b) Babe Ruth League 

(c) Medfield Youth Hockey 

(d) Youth Soccer 

(e) Youth Tennis 

(f) Youth Swimming 

(g) Youth Bowling 

(h) C.Y.O. Basketball 

(i) Girl's summer softball 

(j) Youth Skiing 



(k) Pop Warner football 

(1) Skating program 

(m) American Legion Baseball 

(n) Men's softball 

(o) M.O.T.H. men's softball 

(p) Adult Soccer program 

(q) Adult Volleyball 

(r) Adult Basketball 

(s) Ultimate Frisbee 



The Yourth Advisory Commission, under the advisorship of Commissioners 
William "Jack" Heller and Mary V. Gillis, has been reorganized this year 
electing a permanent Chairman and Vice Chairman. The Y.A.C. has taken a 
more active role in planning, organizing and holding youth functions and 
activities. The Commission is planning numerous projects to assist the 
youth of Medfield and has become an integral part in advising the Park and 
Recreation Commission on its planning for Youth programs. The members of 
the Youth Advisory Commission are the following students: 



Eric Doucette, Chairman 

Frederick Aronstein, Vice Chairman 

Scott Anderson 

Denise Barton 

Lisa Cassidy 

Lisa Craig 

Paula DeVasto 

Joseph DiGiovanni 

Christopher Enz 

Barton Garrison 

Brian Ha j jar 

George Mendrinos 

Jeffery Minet 

Brian Murphy 



Matthew No tine 

Kathleen O'Connor 

Thomas O'Leary, Jr. 

Joshua Peck 

Michael Sweeny 

Christopher Swezey 

Robert Wallace 

Jason Weiner 

Paul Cutler (Rep. Medfield Churches) 

Tom LaPlante (Medfield Police) 

Robert Naughton (Medfield Police) 

Mary Conant (Outreach Worker) 



The Youth Advisory Commission, in cooperation with the Students Against 
Drunk Driving, and with the support of the Park and Recreation Commission in- 
stalled a telephone at the Pfaff Center to help youths who might need assist- 
ance in that area. 



90 



/;«■:«:& .■ 



..'..■:■ 

:■: ,. : , ■: 





FORMER PARK COMMISSIONER WALTER FRANK HONORED BY 
COMMISSIONER ROBERT MILLER 



91 



The Park and Recreation Commission swimming program at Hinkley Park was 
again extremely well used and under Commissioner Heller and Director of the 
facility, Peter Panciocco, further improvements to the facility were made. 

Under the direction of Commissioner "Chip" Lennon, the new ballfields 
at the 56 acres on Hospital Road were highly utilized this year. 

The tennis instructional program under Director Beth Ebby, had its 
largest number of students to date. The skiing program and trips were well 
attended. These programs, under the leadership of Commissioner Sandra Fitch, 
were extremely successful. 

The Park and Recreation Commission and the Planning Board, in a co- 
operative venture, are participating in a study of the park and recreation 
needs of the citizens of Medfield. Eric O'Brien, Associate Commissioner, 
who has extensive experience as a former Chairman and Commissioner of Park 
and Recreation, serves on this Study Committee. 

For next year, the Commission is planning to remodel the block house at 
Hinkley Park, repaint all the equipment at Metacomet Park, and do further 
work at the Hannah Adams Pfaff Community Center and upgrade all Park 
facilities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RobQAX. W. MM2A, Chairman 

WWUuam "Jack" HMeA, Vice Chairman 

SandACL fXXdh, Commissioner 

Mafiy f. GXJUUj* , Commissioner 

"Cklp" LmviOYl, Commissioner 

EKlc 0'bVu.e.n, Commissioner 



92 




FUTURE OLYMPIC STARS AT HINKLEY SWIM POND 



93 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I respectfully submit the report of the Cemetery Department for the 
year ending 1986. 

Again this year a great deal has been accomplished with very little, 
if any, impact on the tax rate. 

Our new section has been completed and is being used now. This should 
have a four to five year life. Meanwhile we shall devote our expansion 
efforts to the Bridge Street sections, developing of the new avenues and 
overcoming any drainage problems that may occur. This will dramatically 
alter the appearance of the cemetery to Bridge Street residents. Once 
again, we hope to enlist the expertise of the Norfolk County Engineers for 
the project as well as the Highway Department with their manpower and 
equipment . 

Keep in mind again the need for expansion. Any land adjacent to the 
existing cemtery should be seriously considered for purchase if ever it be- 
comes available for sale. 

Again, I wish to thank the many Town Departments, and personnel for 
their support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. Tmluj MitckelZ 

SUPERINTENDENT 



94 



THE INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 1986c 

DEPARTMENT PERMITS INSPECTIONS INCOME EXPENSES 
1986 1985 1986 1985 1986 1985 1986 1985 

BUILDING 266 241 1,052 955 $21,845 $35,880 $14,337 $11,794 

PLUMBING 134 173 96 136 4,388 5,671 1,699 1,904 

GAS 100 116 91 169 1,676 1,729 1,266 2,325 

WIRING 232 267 529 532 8,395 9,125 7,389 7,116 

Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for 
the calendar year 1986 was $36,304.00 as compared to $52,405.00 for 1985. 
Expenses for 1986 amounted to $24,691 as compared to $23,139 for 1985. 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

1986 1985 

New single family dwellings 

Additions to private dwellings 

Renovations to private dwellings 

Additions to business buildings 

Renovations to business buildings 

New industrial/business buildings 

Reshingling roofs & installation of new sidewalls 

Private swimming pools 

Accessory buildings 

Residential garages 

Demolitions 

Tents (temporary) 

Signs 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 

Solar 

Stables and barns 

Multi-family dwellings (1-7 unit & 1-14 unit) 

Carnival 

Temporary trailer 

Foundation 

TOTAL 266 241 

Occupancy certificates were issued for 43 new residences in 1986 as 
compared to 39 in 1985. 

Inspections for certification of businesses, schools, nursery schools 
and family residences amounted to 24 inspections for 1986. 

95 



36 


42 


89 


70 


28 


24 


2 


4 


15 


3 


1 


4 


14 


12 


13 


19 


8 


5 


6 


2 


5 


5 


4 


4 


17 


5 


25 


38 





2 


2 








2 














1 






Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 1986 1986 

New Dwellings $5,212,000 $6,452,000 
Renovations & additions, pools, shingling, 

sidewalls etc. on residential 1,839,973 1,460,803 

New construction business and industry 45,000 5,000,000 

Renovations & additions business & industry 874,400 421,314 

Multi-family buildings (21 units) - 1,500,000 

Enforcement of the State Building Code continues to be the responsi- 
bility of the local building inspectors. Section 109.1.1 of that code re- 
quires all permit applicants to have State Construction Supervisor's 
licenses unless they are the property owner. The office of the Inspection 
Department must keep an accurate registration of license holders in order to 
assure compliance with Section 109.1.1. The building inspectors continue 
the enforcement of the code by making annual inspections of schools, churches 
and rest homes as well as other places of assembly. 

The Inspector of Buildings also serves the town in the capacity of En- 
forcing Officer for Zoning and as such devotes many hours to investigation 
and enforcement of the Zoning Bylaw of the Town. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Ryan in the inspection of 
smoke detectors in new construction and additions and renovations was 
greatly appreciated. The Chief and the Inspectors continue to inspect the 
installation of solid fuel burning appliances with an ever continuing number 
of residents placing them into their homes. The residents are again re- 
minded of the importance of having their wood stove installations inspected 
and certified in accordance with requirements of the Massachusetts State 
Building Code. Additionally, the inspectors and the Fire Chief have in- 
itiated an additional inspection requirement during the construction of new 
homes for chimneys. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

As in past years, of the above listed inspections, a number were con- 
cerned with investigation, administration or enforcement in connection with 
violations. Enforcement of 248 CMR 2.00 The Uniform State Plumbing Code and 
the Massachusetts Fuel Gas Code is the responsibility of the local plumbing 
and gas inspectors. Letters and telephone calls were made in relation to 
violations of these state codes as well as referrals to the State Boards of 
Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters. The assistance of Michael Wright as 
Acting Assistant was appreciated once again during the absence of the Gas 
Inspector from time to time during the year. 

In June of this year, Walter R. Nye, Assistant Plumbing Inspector and 
Gas Inspector resigned his position. The Inspection Department gratefully 
acknowledges his years of service since 1959 as Assistant Plumbing Inspector 
and since 1961 as Gas Inspector. In July, Peter Navis was appointed his 
successor to the positions. 



96 



WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electrical 
Code as well as the National Electric Code in his inspections of electrical 
installations for which permits are issued. As with the other inspectors in 
the department, re-inspections for violations are made where necessary and 
letters and follow-up telephone calls are also made. The assistance of 
Tauno Aalto as Assistant Inspector of Wires during the periodic absences of 
the Wiring Inspector was greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jokn P. O'TooZd, Inspector of Buildings 
*Antkony Cato, Local Inspector of Buildings 
Jo&2.pk F. EtiAkim, Wiring Inspector 
WaZtQA R. Nye., Gas Inspector (resigned) 
John A. Ro-6£, JA.. , Plumbing Inspector 
VztOA. Holv-U), Gas Inspector 



97 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL TECHNICAL 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In July 1986, Charles Mucciarone was appointed a representative from 
the Town of Franklin to the Tri-County Regional School District Committee. 
Mr. Mucciarone succeeded Carole Russell who had served the Town and the 
District well for a period of four years. 

The elected officers are: John Hanley (Seekonk) Chairman, Arthur Green 
(Sherborn) Vice-Chairman, and John Hurley (Medway) Secretary. Robert Rappa 
(Franklin) was appointed Chairman of the Budget Sub-Committee and Mr. Hurley 
was appointed Chairman of the Personnel/Policy Sub-Committee. Albert 
Chouinard (Medfield) will continue to lead the Collective Bargaining Sub- 
Committee. 

Mr. Hurley, long active in the Massachusetts Association of School 
Committees, was reelected to a second term as Chairman of Division VIII, 
M.A.S.C. Division VIII is made up on committee members of vocational 
schools statewide. 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the 
second and fourth Wednesday of each month at 8:00 P.M. in the Committee 
Meeting Room at the school. From the beginning of November until the end of 
February, the Committee meets on the first and third Wednesdays specifically 
for the purpose of budget development. Sub-committee meetings are scheduled 
as needed. 

GRADUATION 

On June 1, 210 students were graduated in an impressive ceremony. 
Chairman Hanley delivered the Commencement Address and music was provided by 
the Franklin High School Band conducted by Band Director Eric Rosen. 

Awards and scholarships in the total amount of $23,000 were presented 
to deserving seniors. Class Valedictorian, Daniel Lallier, was awarded 
$1,000 as a Commonwealth Scholar as well as a full scholarship to Wentworth 
Institute. Daniel is a resident of Franklin and will pursue Electrical 
Engineering at Wentworth. 

Medfield residents who were the recipients of awards and scholarships 
are Diana Mordini-Chas and Michael Dawe. Local organizations that con- 
tributed substantially to the scholarship program are Hannah Adams Doris 
Rayner Memorial Association, Medfield Employers & Merchants Association, and 
Griffin Electrical. We appreciate their support and look forward to a long 
and lasting relationship. 

GUIDANCE 

In September, one hundred and seventy-six ninth grade students enrolled 
at Tri-County. Of that number five were Medfield residents. At this time 
there are thirty-one Medfield residents in attendance with a total enroll- 
ment of seven hundred and eighty-three. Medfield' s rate of participation 

98 



has been established at 3.96%. 

Throughout the course of the year the Guidance Department administered 
the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Tests, the SRA Achievement Tests, the 
Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery and the Massachusetts Assessment 
Tests. 

Our immediate follow-up of the June graduates indicates that 74% of them 
entered the workforce, 18% went on to further higher education and 6% enter- 
ed the military. 

TECHNICAL PROGRAMS 

As technology continues to develop, the importance of challenging the 
students in the technical courses become increasingly evident. Therefore, 
the seniors in Electronics have been introduced to the Advanced Placement 
course in Pascal with the expectation that they will be adequately prepared 
to deal with the sophisticated nature of the material. 

The emphasis and thrust of both technical and vocational programs has 
been to provide our students with the competitive edge in the work force. 
The Drafting and Graphic Arts curricular, along with Electronics, have 
utilized more complicated software to achieve that goal. Building upon the 
basic introduction last year to the CAD program and the Modular Composition 
Systems, students have progressed rapidly to programming those computers 
with an improved degree of efficiency. 

SERVICE OCCUPATIONS 

Since the opening of Dean Cooperative Bank last year, students in the 
distributive education program who have rotated through it have been offered 
part-time and full-time positions with the bank's main office. This is per- 
haps one of the best examples of goal achievements for Tri-County staff. 

Rainbow Room renovations are continuing this year and it is expected 
that the work will be completed by Spring. Natural oak wood paneling and 
track lighting haye softened and enhanced the popular dining room. The work 
has been done by Carpentry and Electrical students under the supervision of 
their instructors. 

Patients at Medfield State Hospital are enjoying the creative artistry 
of students in the Commercial Art program. The plain dormitory walls were 
converted into pleasant, colorful murals last year. The project was com- 
pleted in two months, with some patients enthusiastically offering sugges- 
tions and others just amazed at the skill of the students. 

The toddler program in Child Care continued to be extremely popular 
with mothers in the community. Sharing ideas and problems while their 
little children were involved in play with each other became an anticipated 
pleasure on Monday mornings. Because of its popularity, a waiting list for 
the 1987-88 school year has already been established. 

The staff and students in the service occupations at Tri-County wish 
to thank the members of this community for their continued support. 



99 



VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

Grant funds have provided several of our shops with the latest state-of- 
the-art test/training equipment. The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Shop 
has received and put into use a Heat Pump Demonstrator & Controls Trainer, 
Gas Controls Demonstrator, 3-Phase Compressor Controls Demonstrator, and a 
Refrigeration System Trainer. The Machine Shop is about to receive a Spectra 
Light C.N.C. Training that will simulate for training instruction actual 
computer numerical control machining operations. Metal Trades Shop has re- 
ceived and is offering up-to-date instructional methods and proper use of 
their new Plasma Arc Cutting & Welding equipment. The Auto Repair Shop has 
received a Sun Electric Diagnostic Engine Tester. This "computerized inter- 
rogator", as it is called, has the capabilities of testing the complicated 
electronic/computer controlled engines of today. Our upper class Auto Repair 
trainees are now receiving this instruction. 

Our outside work program is now engaged in completely renovating the 
Oak Grove Farm House for the Town of Millis. This farm house has been cer- 
tified and registered by the Historical Society. The project will engage 
our Masonry students to repair and reconstruct three chimneys. Our Carpen- 
try pupils will install a new roof and repair the entire structure (all 
windows and doors included) inside and outside. A new three-room apartment 
will also be included in this project. New electric service, new wiring, 
receptacles and fixtures will be installed by our electrical students. Our 
Plumbing trainees intend to install a new heating system and provide all 
plumbing and drainage needs throughout the entire house. 

Funds have been appropriated by the Town of Medway and we will refurbish 
/upgrade Station II for the Medway Fire Department. Our Masonry, Carpentry, 
Electrical and Plumbing students will provide all of the work skills 
necessary to accomplish this huge project. Work to be done on the Fire 
Station will include a new gas heating system, new electrical system (com- 
plete) , installation of a modern kitchen, three showers, and a twelve-foot 
extension/addition to the building with change over and installation of 
modern overhead doors. Brick facing for the entire structure will enhance 
the building, giving it a new/modern appearance. 

ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 

Once again the Tri-County Athletic Department offered the students of 
Tri-County the opportunity to participate in athletics on the varsity and 
junior varsity level. Although no state or league titles were won, the 
athletes of Tri-County distinguished themselves by determination and pride. 

The Boys Basketball Team held a benefit basketball game honoring the 
heroes who died in the space shuttle disaster. A large sum of money was 
raised and sent to the Space Shuttle Family Relief Fund in Washington. 

The Girls Basketball Team participated in the Cape Cod Basketball Tourn- 
ament and finished in a runner-up position. Nisa Erickson was named to the 
Mayflower League Allstar Team and the Middlesex News Allstar Team. 

Ron Hodgkins displayed some terrific speed and agility in the high and 
low hurdles and was a force in the 100 dash for Cougers Track & Field Team. 

The Baseball Team was led by Senior Captain Ed Recchia who also was 
named to the Mayflower League Allstar Team. 



100 



The Football, Soccer, Volleyball and Cross Country Teams all participated 
in athletic action this Fall. Several Cougars were placed on their respec- 
tive Allstar Teams: Nisa Erickson, Cam McLaughlin, in Volleyball; Dave 
Yurek, Randy Tremblay in Soccer. 

A lot of enthusiasm and interest is being generated by the student body 
over the upcoming hockey and baseball seasons. Hopefully the Cougars will 
soon bring home a championship banner! 

EVENING. SCHOOL 

The first semester of the 1986-87 school year Tri-County Evening School 
offered twenty-five courses. These courses included six which lead to lic- 
enses needed to practice a trade. We also offered the following new courses 
to our program: Cartooning, Homeowners Maintenance, Basic Computer, 
Computer-aided Drafting CAD/CAM, Baking & Cake Decorating, and Graduate 
Equivalency Diploma. 

We currently have a student population of 391, which is the highest en- 
rollment at evening school since Tri-County opened its doors ten years ago. 
During the month of December we will be offering mini-courses which will run 
for a three-week period. 

SUMMARY 

As we move into 1987 and continue to provide the best in educational 
needs to our students, we thank the district residents for their support and 
cooperation. We intend to maintain in the future these high educational 
standards that have earned us that support in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John V. HanZ&y, Chairman 
AtboAt G. Chotu.no/Ld, Medfield 



101 



PUBLIC SCHOOL REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1986 



102 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



The Medfield School Committee began the year 1986 with a presentation by 
the Warrant Committee in which their view of the overall financial situation 
confronting the Town for the coming fiscal year was detailed. The outlook 
was sufficiently bleak at that time to cause the School Committee to request 
a ballot question which, if approved at the annual election, would allow 
override of the Proposition 2 1/2 limitations. During the departmental budget 
presentations conducted in January, it became apparent to the Committee that 
costs associated with the maintenance of a quality educational program were 
increasing due to the rising cost of materials, staff, and mandated programs 
even though enrollment still showed a gradual decline. Reports of the grade 
six through eight teaching teams at the Middle School indicated that the 
change to that type of school organization had been of value. The Committee 
approved curriculum changes at the High School and Middle School which were 
recommended by the Administration and the systemwide organization for Health 
Education was reviewed. A Special Town Meeting, characterized by exception- 
ally large citizen turnout, approved the recommendation of the School Com- 
mittee to accept funding for professional development of the teaching staff 
from the Commonwealth under Chapter 188. 

In February, the elementary and middle schools were submitted for eval- 
uation by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. The High 
School has been and will continue to be periodically evaluated by the same 
organization. The Wheelock School requested and was granted permission to 
proceed with the highly successful Garden Project which involved staff, 
students, and community volunteers in supplying food to needy persons. Some 
non-tenured staff were notified that their contracts would not be renewed 
pending clarification of funding levels to be approved by Town Meeting. 

During March, the Committee revised its policy on Entrance Age in 
response to an administrative recommendation based upon research and intern- 
ally generated experiential data. Medfield was represented in the All-State 
Music Competition. A decision was made to formally designate team leaders 
at the Middle School to better coordinate instructional activity. A public 
hearing was held on the school budget and the Committee subsequently request- 
ed a budget increase of 5.6% from the Town Meeting. 

A Peer Counselling program was presented wherein students, under the 
supervision of professional staff, could assist other students in difficulty. 
The proposal was approved and is now being Implemented. The Committee accept- 
ed the offer of the Medfield Youth Soccer Association to develop an additional 
playing field at the Wheelock School. The Educational Program for the 
Odyssey House was approved by the Committee. The semi-annual evaluation of 
the Superintendent of Schools by the Committee resulted in high praise for 
his accomplishments and willingness to accept professional challenge. 

The Summer Enrichment Program was approved in May. The Committee also 
approved a policy on AIDS which would protect both the afflicted individual 
and those with whom contact occurred. An early morning child care program 
was discussed and later Implemented at no cost to the Town. School Improve- 
ment Councils were formed to oversee use of state funds granted under Chapter 
188. The councils include professional staff, parents, citizens who are not 
parents, and, at the upper levels, students. The school telephone system 

103 



was upgraded to provide services more in keeping with actual needs and at 
significantly lower projected cost. 

In June, the retirement of the High School Science Content Specialist 
was recognized by the Committee with sincere regret. An athletic trainer was 
appointed in response to a felt need for student safety in those programs. A 
middle school summer school program was finalized and approved. 

The remainder of the Committee's meeting time during the summer was de- 
voted to discussion of the staffing of the health education program, the 
development of a program to meet the expanding need for preschool special 
needs students, provision of access for handicapped to the High School and 
Middle School, and initial consideration of a policy against student hazing. 
The name Medfield Middle School was also formally adopted to better reflect 
the changed character of the school and its program. 

In the fall, administrators presented the Committee with specific state- 
ments of their school's goals for the coming year. The Committee met with 
new members of the staff and bus schedule problems which arose as a conse- 
quence of the Committee's attempts to reduce transportation costs, were 
studied and, ultimately, resolved. 

The results of the first tests given statewide under the Massachusetts 
Educational Assessment Program were received with Medfield comparing most 
favorably with schools across the Commonwealth. This indicator illustrated, 
as do others such as SAT scores, school evaluation results, and the number of 
students qualifying in the Merit Scholarship Program, that the Town of 
Medfield continues to receive an excellent return on its investment in educa- 
tion. 

The year closed with a review of the newly adopted attendance policy at 
the High School which appears to have substantially increased attendance and 
reduced tardiness. A statement of educational philosophy for the school 
system was adopted which will serve as the basis for more detailed goals and 
objectives in each school. Funding under the School Improvement Act was 
received and staff members have been designated as Horace Mann Teachers. The 
funding allows selected staff to implement programs they have designed which 
directly benefit students. These activities are conducted in addition to, 
and not as a substitute for, the regular program of instruction. The 
Committee renewed its effort to complete development and codification of 
instructional standards. 

The Committee recognizes that it serves at the pleasure of the citizens 
of Medfield and that its primary charge is to provide the highest quality 
educational experience to the children as is possible. In a time of declin- 
ing resources, this duty may put the Committee into seeming conflict with 
various segments of the community, either individuals who perceive service 
reductions in activities in which they have an interest or groups or agencies 
with valid needs which compete for resources with school programs. Better 
understandings frequently result from open discussion. The success of the 



104 



Medfield Public Schools rests on a base of support among individual citizens 
as expressed at Town Meeting, by individuals volunteering their time daily in 
the classrooms, by the good works accomplished by many citizen groups who 
support the schools, and by the good will of all who take the time to become 
involved in any way. We thank you for your assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. Pcwut Quctf/iomoni, ChaJjunan 
iiJ^ttiam A. HajjOA 
Rob&it A, Klyvi>man 
Gay W. V 1 knaxo 
Ba/ibaAa Jane IwppoA 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

OF SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

In this report, my third as your Superintendent of Schools, I am pleased 
to combine my efforts along with those of principals, directors and others to 
present you with a series of reports as to what has taken place in the Medfield 
Public Schools during the 1986 calendar year. 

Reorganization Scheme : The secondary reorganization scheme for the 
school year commencing in September 1986 was based on the best use of available 
space in both the High School and the Middle School. This scheme placed the 
ninth grade at the High School under total control of the High School Princi- 
pal. Also, several classrooms at the Middle School were set aside for the 
exclusive use of the High School. This provided a semi-campus type organiza- 
tion for the High School. 

On August 18, 1986 the name of the Junior High School was officially 
changed to Medfield Middle School. 

Financial : The impact of the cost of operating the Medfield Public 
Schools is of constant concern to all of us. There is no escaping the fact 
that education is the most costly service rendered by a community to its 
citizens. The community constantly considers the cost to the Town of any new 
proposal while comparing this cost with the value to the education of the 
students if the proposals were not adopted. 

Every year, the cost of providing just the same level of offerings 
increases over the previous year. Our aim is to minimize this increase and 
to be extremely selective about new courses and programs. In this regard, 
however, we must also keep in mind that the schools around us, with whose 
students our students must compete, are offering new courses and programs. 
As a result, from time to time we must offer new courses in order to remain 
competitive. Additionally, with new state mandates in regard to testing and 
other matters, we are often forced to adjust our programs to meet these new 
guidelines and standards. 

The major portion of school costs goes to salaries, primarily of teachers, 
but also of administrators, custodians, clerical staff, etc. With the impact 
of the collective bargaining process and the changing collective bargaining 
laws, the pressure for increases is becoming greater and greater. 

105 



Statewide Assessment Tests : The results of the statewide assessment tests 
in Reading, Math and Science were released in November of 1986. Medfield did 
extremely well in all areas of the tests. These tests were administered in 
March 1986 to all Grade III, VII and XI students. 

The purposes of the tests were to ensure excellence statewide, increase 
accountability in both the individual school as well as the system as a whole, 
to test lower, medium and higher order of skills and finally, to compare school 
scores with similar schools in similar communities as well as with the state 
and national averages. The tests did not record individual student results 
by name but rather the average of the school. We are still analyzing the 
results in hopes of gaining additional valuable data. 

HOW MEDFIELD SCHOOLS SCORED 

Grade III: Grade VII: Grade XI: 

Reading: 1480 (1380) Reading: 1400 (1390) Reading: 1430 (1390) 
Math: 1460 (1380) Math: 1430 (1390) Math: 1460 (1410) 
Science: 1470 (1380) Science: 1380 (1390) Science: 1470 (1410) 

The average score statewide was 1300 (average score for towns similar to 
Medfield is in parenthesis). 

We are proud of our students, staff, administrators, parents, etc. for 
the outstanding achievements of the Medfield Public Schools. 

Curriculum : In the curriculum area one of our foci over the last few 
years has been the exploration of educational programs for gifted and talented 
students. We will continue to explore alternatives in this area in an attempt 
to better service the needs of these students. 

During this past school year the School Committee approved the position 
of K^-12 Health Content Specialist and reinforced our health program by man- 
dating a Grade IX health course. 

Staff Development : One of the areas identified as a concern during the 
year has been that of staff development and support. Certainly, this concern 
has been evidenced in all of the reports on education which have been publish- 
ed recently. Highlighting our staff development program was a visit from the 
Commissioner of Education for the Commonwealth, Harold Raynolds. We intend to 
continue our emphasis in the area of staff development. 

Cable T.V. Studio : We were hoping to have the Cable T.V. Studio at the 
Middle School fully operational by now, but due to construction delays it 
appears as if it will not be available for instructional use until sometime 
in mid-January 1987. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Tkomom, M. ReZi 

Superintendent of Schools 



106 



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ft 




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CO n 


A 


o d !H B 


60 


o 


ri 


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CJ 


u 


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^ cu 


rQ > 0) d 


d •> rd N 


d cu 


CD 


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d 


4-1 


01 


CQ 


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o 


U *H •> 


CU CJ 


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O 00 CU N 


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SH 


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cO 


rH 


rH 


4-1 


d 


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d d 


CJ rH d rH 


CD d rH CO 


60 "d 


0) 


rH PL, CJ O 


l-I 


d 


rQ 


4-1 


d 


d 


rQ co cu 


|>! QJ 


O rH d rH 


rH d rQ rH 


CO o 


> 


CO cO CU O 


a 


o 


o 


o 


01 


cO 


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rH CU 


4-i 3 co o) 


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X X 


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g r-4 rJ a 


a 


a 


S3 


Pm 


04 


CO 


CO CO CO 


CO CO 


CO CO H > 


|S >x CJ Pm 

■a -k 



109 



m r^vor^<rvDOLOc^<j-r^Oi— ioocolticm 

r-» ^Dcor--r^-r^-oo^Or~-^inr^ooLni^.r^cc 

rH fHiHrHtHtHi-HiHrHiH'HiH'-liHrHrHrH 



CTnvOOcOvOlTiOvO O H "1 



o 

CO 
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CD 


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4-1 


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rH 


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CJ 


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CO 




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PQ 


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CD 


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d 


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M 


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CO 


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cx-d 


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43 


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T3 


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u 


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CO 


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CO 


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u 




CJ 


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CD 


cfl 


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N 


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CO 




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O 


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one 


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cO CD CD 


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N 


t>^ 


rl 


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O 


a, cd 


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co 


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cO 


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CJ 


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CD 


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1-1 i 


5 


a g 


CO 


43 M 


5-4 4-t (D 


o 


5-i 


5-i 


m 


5-i X X 


rH 


rNP 


W IX! rH 


r-A 


cO 


CD 


> 


T3 


CD 


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4-J 


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CD 


CO cO 


CO -H 5-1 


5-1 


CO 


Q) 


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O CD <D 


O 


CO O 


CJ CJ CD 


CO 


4-J 


43 


CJ 


rH 


pq 


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P 


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h h O 


CJ 


P3 


X 


P3 


P3 & X 


»J 


S3 S3 


S3 S3 55 


P-l 
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CO 


H 


S3 



110 



^^ /^n /^ c^n ^v /^N /^N /*T\ rT\ ITS rT\ rTN ns rT\ /T\ rT\ (T\ fTs rT\ rT\ 



CTN(T\0>o>c^<Tvc^cT>CT>o^c7NcrvcT\CTv<TiaNcrvcr>cr\ 
■ i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ___j i t 





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115 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NEW PERSONNEL AND EFFECTIVE DATE 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

*Dalpe, Cynthia 
*Gubellini, Barbara 

LaPoint, Douglas 
*Sullivan, Roseann 

Wilson, Mary Ann 

WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Slason, Michael 
Snyder, Pamela 

PUPIL SERVICES 

Devlin, Lisa 
*Gallagher, Julie 
*Kavanaugh, Mary 
*Naughton, Karen 

Stegall, Susan 
*Sull, Theresa 

COMPUTER AIDES 

Blase, Catherine 
Delio, Carleen 
Tasker, Gerald ine 

PUPIL SERVICES AIDE 

*Palazzolo, Jane 

FOOD SERVICES 

Briggs, Valerie 
Putney, Joan 



MEDFIELD MIDDLE SCHOOL 



December 

September 

September 

October 

September 



December 
September 



January 

September 

September 

September 

October 

March 



September 

April 

September 



December 



November 
January 



Atwood , Donna 
*McElroy, Patricia 
*Palazzolo, Jane 
*Zaharakis, James 



KINDERGARTEN AIDE 
*Gatti, Rosemary 
GRADE ONE AIDE 
Bond, Florencia 
CHAPTER I AIDE 



September 
September 
December 
March 



September 



September 



Rosengarten, Margery October 

LEARNING CENTER AIDE 

Brown, Adelaide September 



LIBRARY AIDE 

Crowley, Nancy 

CUSTODIANS 

Bouvier, Timothy 
Chudzik, Thomas 
Conlon, Robert 

*Contrino, Louis 
L'ltalien, Albert 
Mar tell, Edward 

*Virgilli, John 



September 



July 

May 

October 

September 

August 

September 

September 



Collins, Marsha 
Cook, Janet 
Craig, Kathleen 
Dolan, Cheryl 
Lawless-Croak, Anne 
Noble, Judith(Sabbatical) 
Pope, William 
Reed, Janice 



*Part-time Employee 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

Food Services 
Dale Street School 
Middle School 
Pupil Services 
Wheelock 
Senior High 
Wheelock 
Wheelock 



September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 



116 



TERMINATIONS 



TERMINATION AND EFFECTIVE DATE 



SENIOR HIGH 



*Coffey, Patricia 


June 


Crane, Diane 


June 


DiFelice, Claire 


November 


Dowse, Mary Elizabeth 




(Retired) 


June 


Langer, Ellen 


June 


Mollo, Arlene 


June 


Ward, Diana 


June 


DALE STREET SCHOOL 





Woodburn, Douglas(Retired)August 
Youlden, Garrett November 



PUPIL SERVICES 

Darcy-Campbell, Karen 
Devlin, Lisa 
Esper, Theresa 
Kaufman, Irene 
Kerr, Julia 
McNeill, Kim 
Meehan, William 
Miner, Deirdre 
*Sull, Theresa 

LIBRARY AIDE 

Collins, Maureen 

FOOD SERVICES 

Sarapas, Cynthia 
Savage, Charlotte 



May 

June 

June 

June 

August 

November 

August 

January 

June 



May 



October 
October 



MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Deegan, Andrew 
Fleming, Frances 
Hayes, Robin 
Nichols, John 
Oertel, Martha 
Saftler, Ellen 
Zaharakis, James 



WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Denman, Jeffrey 
Han key, Richard 
Lee, James 

CHAPTER I AIDE 

Logsdon, Susan 

COMPUTER AIDE 



Gil son, Marilyn 
CUSTODIANS 



February 

June 

June 

October 

June 

September 

April 



June 
June 
July 



September 



Delio, Carleen June 
LEARNING CENTER AIDE 



August 



Boudreau, Jeffrey September 

Bouvier, Timothy September 

*Chudzik, Thomas July 

Fralin, Edward July 

Fralin, Stephanie May 

Landry, Leon August 

L'ltalien, Albert October 
Pritoni, Harold(Retired) November 

Rieger, Richard January 



*Part-time Employee 



117 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT 
SUPERINTENDENT FOR BUSINESS 

AFFAIRS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit my annual report for the year 1986. 

As in previous years, it is only with the considerable support and hard 
work of the personnel in the Central Office, Business Office, and the staff of 
the cafeteria, custodial and maintenance departments that we have achieved a 
successful year. Medfield remains fortunate in the personnel it has retained 
in the various positions of its public sector. We continue to enjoy excellent 
relations with the staff of Town Hall and other town boards, for which we are 
grateful. We have also continued to benefit from the Medfield Prison Project 
in renovation of many of our buildings, and in a roofing repair project at the 
Dale Street School. 

1986 was a year in which much was accomplished in a time of much change. 
Harold Pritoni, who worked for 20 years in the school system and was our 
Director of Buildings and Grounds, retired in November; we are presently in 
the process of studying a reorganization of this position in order to assess 
our effectiveness and provide the optimum in keeping our buildings and grounds 
in the excellent condition we have enjoyed over the years. Mr. Pritoni' s 
contributions during his tenure have been considerable, and we hope to con- 
tinue and improve upon the work he has done. 

In the area of buildings and grounds, we have enjoyed the continued good 
fortune of being able to make school facilities available for use by the pub- 
lic. However, this usage has continued to grow, and we are soon approaching 
the time when non-school activities will be curtailed. Hopefully, with the 
increased availability of fields and other town resources, we can go on pro- 
viding the facilities for many of these activities. A list of organizations 
using the facilities of the schools would include practically all the organi- 
zations in town; among them are the Hannah Adams Club, Boston Area Youth 
Scoccer League, St. Edward's Catholic Daughters, American Field Service, CYO, 
Medfield Youth Bowling Association, Cub Scouts, Medfield Park and Recreation, 
Ciba-Corning Corporation, Medfield Fitness Association, Girl Scouts, Boy 
Scouts, and Scrambled Eights Square Dancing Club. Several individual citizens 
also avail themselves of our facilities on a regular basis. This use, in 
addition to. regular school and athletic programs, fully occupies all gyms, 
cafeterias, auditoriums, and various other facilities that are made available. 

The funds which have been accumulating for the improvement of playing 
fields throughout the school areas will begin to bear fruit in the near future; 
we are beginning to move in the direction of providing greater security of the 
fields, which will clear the path for their development and improvement. 

The purchase in 1986 of a second light tractor for grounds care has in- 
creased our ability to care for the 40+ acres presently under our management. 

The Lease of Memorial School to SNCARC has proved sufficient to care for 
the building itself, without being a burden to the town; as provided under 
the conditions allowing us to lease the building, we have placed a pre-school 
program in the building which is part of our Pupil Services Department. 
Extensive roof repairs on the building have been made during the past year also 

118 



There was considerable alteration required with the transfer of Grade 
Nine to the High School in order to make our Middle School a separate entity, 
and in order to use some areas of the Middle School for High School classes 
(required by the inability of the High School to house the entire Grades 9 
through 12) . 

Two more of our buildings will be made handicapped -accessible as a result 
of Town Meeting action. After unavoidable delay caused by the time required 
for the manufacture of the lifts, one has been installed in the Senior High 
School, and by the time this report is released, the one for Dale Street 
should also be in place. In making our buildings handicapped-accessible, we 
should thank the highway department, who hard-topped and ramped the exits at 
the High School. 

The telephone project which was initiated last year has been completed, 
and we have replaced the outmoded system with a system which should realize 
a savings, paying for itself within a period of four years at the most. This 
proved to be one of the trials which was overcome by our personnel, when the 
change-over date was changed due to the strike of New England Telephone to the 
day before school opened - once again proving the flexibility and cooperative 
spirit of our personnel. 

The budget approved at the Town Meeting of April 1986 provided a 5.6% 
increase over the previous year, for a total of $7,027,928. The review process 
was a continuing study in cooperation between Town agencies and boards, as it 
is each year. The process for fiscal 1987 has begun, with the same indication 
of cooperation. 

Cafeteria/Food Services have continued their record of maintaining a 
self-supporting service within the schools. Mrs. Cynthia Sarapas, Food Ser- 
vices Director for several years, resigned in October, and as this is being 
written, we are in the process of appointing a replacement. It is sincerely 
hoped that we can continue, and perhaps even improve upon, the excellent food 
service which we have enjoyed for the past few years under Mrs. Sarapas. 

Transportation provided us with a rocky start to school in September 1986, 
but these problems were taken care of as expeditiously as possible, and we are 
again transporting a large percentage of our students safely and on time. As 
new development occurs in Medfield, the problem areas are increasing as build- 
ing occurs in areas where there is questionable access for school buses. Also, 
in order to try to reduce this very expensive portion of the school budget, 
we are continuing to study further reduction in stops, in an effort to stay 
within the present numbers of buses if at all possible. 

We are currently working with the Capital Outlay Committee to arrive at 
a definition of capital projects which will more accurately fill the needs of 
the school department and allow a better analysis of annual budgets relative 
to the capital investments of the Town. We also continue our participation on 
various Town committees, and will continue to seek better ways to provide 
maintenance, custodial services, cafeteria services, transportation and finan- 
cial accounting and budgeting for the school departments, and continue the 
fine record which accrued before my advent into this office. 



119 



The people of Medfield have continued to be supportive during difficult 
times, and we continue to appreciate this support and encouragement. As in 
the past, I would express my personal appreciation for the many kindnesses and 
expressions of patience as we have pursued solutions to the problems of running 
the day-to-day activities of the school system. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Van E. Hogan 

Assistant Superintendent for 
Business Affairs 

REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK 
KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School I respectfully submit our Annual 
Report for the school year ending December 31, 1986. 

The official enrollment of the high school for this year was 604. There 
were 166 students in the Class of 1986. Of these 80.6% went on to a four- 
year college; 6.9% to a two-year college; 1.3% attended a non-college educa- 
tional institution; 1.8% enlisted in the armed services; 9.4% entered the 
world of work. 

In the Class of 1986 Brian M. Garrison was named Valedictorian and Karen 
M. Struck was named Salutatorian. 18.6% of the graduates were members of the 
National Honor Society. 

During the past year the National Merit Corporation notified Medfield 
High School that two of the students were named finalists. They were Brian 
M. Garrison and Ashish D. Parikh. Four students were named semi-finalists 
and six received Letters of Commendation in the National Merit Scholarship 
Program. 

The SAT averages for the Class of 1986 were reported in the fall of the 
current school year. The Verbal Mean Score was 468 and the Math Mean Score 
was 518. Over 93% of the class took the College Boards. 

Our faculty this year consists of 62 certified professionals. Advanced 
degrees are held by 83% of the staff. Continual professional improvement is 
evident by the many courses which our faculty takes yearly. 

During this year's school reorganization we incorporated Grade 9 as part 
of our high school. Due to the overcrowded situation we are presently using 
six rooms as an annex at the middle school. The students and faculty have 
adjusted to this major change. 

During this school year the State Department of Education required our 
eleventh grade students to participate in the Assessment Testing Program. 
The purpose of this test is to Improve curriculum and instruction in the 
public schools. Students were tested in the areas of reading, mathematics, 
and science. Our students' average test scores in these disciplines were 
higher than the state average as well as communities similar to our own with 

120 



which we were compared. 

The high school administration is presently developing preliminary plans 
in preparation for the formal evaluation of our high school by the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges. Next year our professional staff will be 
involved in the lengthy and important process of conducting our self -evaluation. 

We have had several interesting and effective in-service workshops which 
were conducted for our faculty this year. We were honored to have as a speak- 
er our new State Commissioner of Education, Mr. Harold Raynolds. We also had 
the opportunity of conducting a combined in-service with Holliston and Dover/ 
Sherborn High Schools. One of the most interesting workshops conducted this 
year dealt with bereavement, sponsored by the Northfield Counseling Associates. 

As of this date our Peer Counseling Training Program has begun. Our 
students who will be trained by our Outreach Worker and a faculty member will 
volunteer their time in working as peer counselors. Upon completion of the 
course they will work with fellow classmates at the high school as well as 
middle school and elementary school students who are in need of assistance. 

This year 1 girl and 8 boys represented Medfield High School at Boys and 
Girls State. This annual event gives Medfield High School students the 
opportunity to meet with peers across the state in a mock political convention. 

Many of our students were honored during this past year by receiving 
recognition for outstanding performance in both academics and athletics. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Medfield School 
Committee, the Superintendent of Schools, the Assistant Superintendent, and 
the many parents and community groups for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ToAAOi P. fWLadzA 
Principal 



121 



GRADUATION EXERCISES OF MEDFIELD 
HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1986 



Sunday, June 8, 1986 - 2:00 p,m, 
PROGRAM 



PROCESSIONAL 

"Pomp and Circumstance" - Elgar 



INVOCATION 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM 

WELCOME 

MESSAGE TO GRADUATING CLASS 

HONOR ESSAYS 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT 



Class of 1986 

Medfield High School Concert Band 

Douglas Godfrey, Director 

Reverend Robert Wood 

Medfield High School Concert Band 

Moira K. McCabe 
President, Class of 1986 

Thomas M. Reis 
Superintendent of Schools 

Brian M. Garrison and Karen M. Struck 

Alexis A. Nejame 
Vice President, Class of 1986 



PRESENTATION TO FOREIGN EXCHANGE STUDENTS 



A.F.S. Students 



PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

Honor Awards 
D.A.R. Certificate 



William F. Nourse 
Clerk, Board of Selectmen 

Dolores Palacios, Spain 
Klaaske Zwerver, Holland 



Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 



Friends of Medfield Library Amy Fiske Memorial Award Maura McNicholas 



Medfield School Boosters School Spirit Awards 

Medfield Teachers Association 

American Legion Auxiliary, Beckwith Post No. 110 

American Legion Medals 

Catholic Daughters of America 

Bob Porack Memorial Award 

Medfield High School Theatre Society 



Ellen Dugan 

John Cuoco, President 

Barbara Morgan 

Al Manganello 

June Doucette 

Robert Lester Porack 

Lynda St. James 



122 



Presentation of Appointment to Naval Academy 
Certificate of Accomplishment 

Presentation of Certificate of Acceptance 
United States Military Academy 

PRESENTATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS 

Amy Fiske American Field Service Scholarship 



Paul W. Need ham 
Lt . Cmdr . , Ret , 

Karl Schwartz 
Cadet Lt. 



Kathy and Richard Fiske 



National Merit Scholarship - Colgate-Palmolive Company Gay D'Amaro 

National Merit Scholarhsip - Honeywell Corporation Medfield Sch. Comm. 



Hall Foundation Scholarship 
Fairfield University Scholarship 

Ohio State University Scholarship 
Providence College Scholarship 

Commonwealth Scholarship 
Washington University Scholarship 

Page Realty Scholarship 

National Honor Society Scholarships/Awards 

Student Council Scholarships/Awards 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarships 

Medfield Music Boosters Scholarship 

Corning Medical Scholarships 

Medfield Police Association Scholarship 

Medfield Jaycees Scholarships 

Medfield Women's Association Scholarship 



Robert Kinsman 
Medfield School Committee 

Barbara Jane Tupper 
Medfield School Committee 

William Ha j jar 
Medfield School Committee 

Al Rao 

Richard Shapiro 

Gordon Hodne 

Ellen Gruhn 

John McCormack 

Robert Her see 

Rose Johnson 

Richard Bishop 

Jim Mcintosh 

Donna Dolan 

Richard DeSorgher 



Robert Luke Memorial Scholarship 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship/Award Al Manganello 

Medfield Employers & Merchants Organization Scholarship Harry Ballard 



123 



MESSAGE TO CLASS OF 1986 F, Paul Quatromoni 

Chairman, Medfield School Committee 



*PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

F. Paul Quatromoni, Chairman 
Medfield School Committee 
Thomas M. Reis, Superintendent of Schools 
Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

BENEDICTION Reverend Rollin Karnehm 

RECESSIONAL The Class of 1986 

"Consecration of the House" - Beethoven Medfield High Sch. Concert Band 



124 



CLASS OF 1986 



* Andrew Paul Alas so 
//Janice Lee Ames 

* //Bethany L. Anderson 
Helen Elise Archer 
Merrie Ruth Aronstein 
Lauren Joan Backer 
Brooks Thomas Baker 
Debora Anne Ballou 
Barbara Susan Beale 
Jakob William Berger 
Bruce Douglas Berry 
Jennifer Joan Berthiaume 
//Matthew Thomas Bohn 
//Andrea Maria Bonanno 
Ann Marie Brando lo 
*Patricia Marie Breen 
Joanna Theresa Brennan 
Angela Dawn Brown 
Vincent Jude Brown 
William Thomas Brymer 
Julie Ann Burke 
Toni Lynne Burrow 
Robert Irl Cahill 
*Brenda Marie Campbell 
Glenna Diann Campbell 
Karin Jeannene Carlson 
Cynthia Leah Carreiro 
Edward John Carreiro, Jr, 
Heather Jane Carter 
Todd Michael Caruso 
Cathy Jean Carvalho 
Jessica Lynn Cassavant 

^//Jennifer Ann Centore 
Brian Edward Clarke 
David Bartlett Colby 
Debra Lynne Coleman 
Matthew John Connors 

*//Kristen Marie Contieri 
Robin Ann Cullen 
Michelle Marie DeVasto 
Andrew Peter Devlin 
Timothy N. Dobson 
Thomas Paul Donovan 
//Donna A. Dubanowitz 
T. Christopher Duffy 
R. Christopher Dugan 
Sheryl Ann Dumas 
//Karen Elizabeth Edwards 
Page Elizabeth Everbeck 

* //Maria Exarhopoulos 
Mont David Fairfax 

*//Lisa M. Fernandes 



Loretta J. Fletcher 
Catherine Ann Flynn 
Kristen Lee Fuglestad 
*//Daniel Spencer Garceau 
* //Brian Matthew Garrison 

//Donna Marie Gat toni 
Michael Patrick Gaughran 
Kimberly Susan Gavrilles 
Mary Katherine Gillis 
William Francis Gillis 
Sean Michael Gilpatrick 

//Deborah Jeanne Glew 
Deborah A. Good 
Kimberly A. Goodale 
James Joseph Gorman 

//Christopher Lloyd Griffith 
Michael Albert Hallett 
Mark Adam Ha Hal 
Lindsay Hallowell 
Joann Gloria Haney 
Sean Clayton Hart 
Christine Helen Haverty 
Melissa Dawn Helton 
Daniel Turner Howell 

//Robert Anthony Hyland 
Michael John Jackson 
Colleen Marie Jaffarian 
Paul R. Janovitz 
Eric Michael Jones 
Elizabeth Ann Kalinowski 
James Richard Kallio 
Christina C. Karafotias 
* //Jennifer Marie Keefe 
Timothy Vincent Keefe 
Alan Russell Keith II 
Shannon Margaret Kelley 
Rachel Lea Kern 
Jonathan J . Klenk 
Melissa Ann Lachapelle 
Douglas LaFond 
Paul Henri Lahaise 

//Virna Teresa Lechiara 

//James Patrick Leonard 
*//Bonnie Kathleen Macintosh 

Wendy J . MacKay 
*//Heidi Frances MacKinnon 
Joseph Warren Marin 
Terese Marie Mascari 
Lisa J. Mason 
Nicholas R. Matczak 
Moira Katherine McCabe 
John Ritchey McCarthy 



125 



//Karen Marie McCarthy 
Susan Denise McCarthy 

*# Shannon Doreen McCormack 
//Jamais Louise McCullough 
Cheryl Elizabeth McDowell 
Ellen Margaret McLaughlin 
Peter McNeeley 
Karen Louise McQuillen 
John Joseph Merck, III 
Molly Lynn Miner 
Michelle Ruth Mitchell 
Partha Mittra 
Timothy R. Morgan 
Donna Lynn Musto 
//Alexis Ann Nejame 
Michael Dennis Newman 
Kristen Elizabeth Nicker son 
Thomas Nightingale 
Amy Lee Nyman 
Patricia O'Brien 

*//Ashish Parikh 

Lauren Stacy Parrish 
J. Dolores Palacios Paya 
Courtney Elizabeth Peck 
Deborah Anne Pierce 
Diane Elizabeth Pierce 
William Alen Priante, Jr. 
Catherine M. Rezza 
Christopher A. Ricard 
Michael James Rogers 
David Kenneth Rowe 



//Stacey Patricia Russell 

Barbara Ruzzo 

Daniel Lee Ryan 

James E. Ryan 

Tracy Ann Ryan 
*//Karen Elizabeth Schwartz 

Jean Marie Shapiro 

Denise Marie Shaw 

Kevin Michael Shiels 

Andrew Joseph Sipas 

Roger Smith 
*Naida Eugenie Snipas 

Susan Beth Steinberg 
* //Karen Marie Struck 

Lisa Kristine Sullivan 

William Cunningham Sullivan 

Christopher M. Sussmann 

Evelyn Marie Thibault 
//Le Hoa Ton 

Lynne Marie Tortorici 

Kristine Louise Tupper 

John Alfred Turmell 

Alan Joseph Urban 

John Edmond Varnum 

Joseph H. Villa 

Denise Marie Wallace 

Samantha Ruth Walsh 
//Roger Jewett Wheeler 

Christopher Scott Whichard 

Maria Joy Wood 

Klaaske Zwerver 



MARSHALLS 



Kevin Kim 



Jonathan Danielson 



* Upper 10% of the graduating class academically 

# National Honor Society 



126 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD MIDDLE 

SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Medfield Middle School, I respectfully submit the 
Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1986. 

The School Committee acted in 1986 to transfer the ninth grade to Medfield 
High School and rename the Medfield Junior High School to the Medfield Middle 
School. 

The Medfield Middle School opened in September of 1986 with 375 students 

119 in grade six, 120 in grade seven, and 136 in grade eight. For the first 

time each grade consisted of one team of teachers with a School Committee 
appointed team leader. Mrs. Roseanne Gross was named team leader for grade 
six, Mr. Joseph McHugh for grade seven and Mr. Richard DeSorgher for grade 
eight. Health education was added to grades six and eight and industrial 
arts and home economics to grade six. 

Seven of the classrooms on the first floor of the Middle School were 
assigned as the High School Annex in order to facilitate the addition of 
grade nine. 

New staff members to the Medfield Middle School included Mrs. Nancy 
Salka, Guidance; Mrs. Karen Naughton, Secretary; Mrs. Donna Atwood, Math 
(first semester); Mrs. Patricia McElroy, Math; Mrs. Adelaide Brown, Resource 
Room Aide; and Mrs. Jane Palazzolo, Reading. 

The first half of the 1986-87 school year at the Middle School has been 
noteworthy for the numerous faculty team meetings centered around monitoring 
student growth and communication with parents in addition to team level 
student activities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Voaglcu Ide 

Princiapl 

REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal this will be my eighteenth annual report and the second for 
Dale Street School for grades four and five for the year ending December 31, 
1986. The school year opened with 268 students; 127 in grade four, 132 in 
grade five and nine students in the Tri-Valley Collaborative. 

As part of the New England School Development Council Exchange Program, 
a team of teachers visited schools in Glastonbury, Connecticut and Amherst, 

127 



Massachusetts. The objectives of these visits were to explore Reading and 
Grouping practices. Teachers from Hamilton, Massachusetts observed our Math- 
ematics and Science programs. Other curriculum matters and teaching methods 
and techniques were also points of discussion. This exchange program did not 
only enhance and broaden our curriculum but also contributed to the profession- 
al development of staff. The success of this endeavor was fully realized at 
a meeting in February when all participating schools shared their reports. 

Mathematics Grant 

Katherine Belmont, grade four teacher, wrote a Commonwealth In-service 
Grant that focused on problem solving and critical thinking skills in Math. 
Sample lessons, making materials and enrichment ideas were provided by an 
experienced math consultant. 

Horace Mann Grant 

Claire McKechnie, Katherine Belmont, Joan Bruno, Kathryn Touhey, and 
Mary Cauldwell were designated as Horace Mann teachers for the Dale Street 
School. The program funded by the Commonwealth was designed to increase 
teacher initiative and creativity and to improve the use of valuable teaching 
resources. Their grant focused on providing enrichment activities for students 
in grades four and five. 

During the summer, a group of elementary school teachers met to discuss 
the implementation of the "Accents on Science" program. This new text allowed 
for participation in science activities which resulted in students developing 
inquiry skills for problem solving. Students learned to express themselves 
logically and creatively, through a multi-sensory approach. 

The computer program at the fourth and fifth grade level not only expand- 
ed the computer skills introduced at the primary level, but also integrated 
new skills into the entire curriculum. In addition to computer class and lab 
time, students are given the opportunity to work in the Computer Room on their 
own projects or those planned by their teachers. An after-school Intramurals 
Program gives students another opportunity to use computers. The Intramural 
Program continues to be very popular with the students. Over 170 students 
from grades four and five participated. Activities such as floor hockey, 
basketball, computers, aerobics, drama, sketching and the school newspaper 
were included. 

A high degree of interest and talent was evident in the following pro- 
grams: The Beginner Instrumental program in grade four include 17 in Band 
and 35 in Orchestra. The fifth grade instrumental program sported 18 Orches- 
tra members and 41 band personnel. There were 85 students in the fifth grade 
chorus. 

The local newspapers continued to be focal points of school news. This 
school acted as a facilitator by sending and writing educational articles 
that pertained to the school system. Monthly Parent Discussion meetings, 
scheduled Parent Conferences, School Newsletters and Progress Reports provided 
important links of communication between school and home. 

Gratitude is extended to our dedicated staff for their diligent and con- 
scientious effort in making the curriculum meaningful and interesting for 
students. The office personnel is to be commended for their valuable 
assistance to the operation of the school. Custodial, cafeteria and bus 
personnel contributed effectively to the total school situation. The School 
Community Association's active role in providing programs and services to the 

128 



faculty and students is sincerely appreciated. The continued direction and 
leadership of the School Committee and Central Administration has resulted in 
educational programs that provide for the total development of students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ftwivik J. Hodman 

Principal 

REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK 



SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit this report to you regarding the 
educational program and related activities of the Ralph Wheelock School for 
the year ending December 31, 1986. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

An increase in the number of registrations at the primary level necessi- 
tated the assignment of one additional section of third grade for September 
1986. The figures below reflect grade level enrollments recorded on October 
1, 1986. 



GRADE 


ENROLLMENT 


SECTIONS 


K 


140 


7 


1 


134 


7 


2 


157 


7 


3 


148 


7 



The staff of the Ralph Wheelock School worked diligently to fulfill the 
expectations and high standards which have become a trademark of the educa- 
tional program offered by the Town of Medfield. 

SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 

The parents, as well as the community at large, continue to provide the 
Wheelock School with tremendous support in all of its activities and special 
projects. Representatives from all segments of our community assisted with 
establishing the first school Victory Garden. This garden provided a total 
of 2,000 pounds of fresh produce which was distributed in the metropolitan 
region in an effort to teach our children that positive social action Is a 
responsibility which comes with the basic concept of democratic living. 
Strong citizenship was also cultivated in food drives and in projects designed 
to enable our children to impact on their immediate geographic area. 

Our parents also responded to our special awareness programs dealing with 
child assault prevention and substance abuse. Large audiences participated 
in sessions designed to prepare parents to support specialized lessons on 
these sensitive topics. Parents continued to provide the school with count- 
less hours of volunteer time in an effort to maximize education opportunities 
and to share in those special moments when someone very little understands 

129 



something of great magnitude. 

The Parent Advisory Council met on a consistent basis and provided feed- 
back relative to the school curriculum, instructional materials, school 
services and support programs. The Community School Association provided 
numerous services to children, parents and the community at large. In addi- 
tion, CSA fundraising allowed for the expansion of the school's computer lab. 

Parents demonstrated their eagerness to participate in school related 
activities by joining their children for Open House, Classroom Visitation 
Days, Flag Day, Winter and Spring Music Festivals, Parent Lunch Days and on 
the many special experiences scheduled by the school. Parent-Teacher confer- 
ences, as well as parent In-service programs, were offered to enable parents 
to become more familiar with the academic program at the primary level. 

CURRICULUM 

In-service opportunities for the staff focused on the areas of science 
and math. As a result of this study and research, the Merrill Science Program 
was adopted for use K-6. In addition, the newly revised Holt Mathematics 
Program was introduced. This fast paced math curriculum has already proven 
itself to be a challenging course of study for the elementary grades. 

The results of the statewide School Assessment Testing Program, initiated 
in the spring of 1986, were made public in September. The community should 
take great pride in the superior scores attained by our third grade pupils. 
This level of achievement could not have been attained without the strong 
efforts of a dedicated staff, a sound curriculum, eager students and a will- 
ingness to support learning on the part of our citizens. When compared to 
like communities with similar background characteristics, our average scores 
in all areas assessed were superior. 

SCHOOL PROGRAMS 

During the past year our children were offered a series of cultural ex- 
periences in dance, music and American folklore. In addition to these pro- 
grams, many special events were planned that featured our children, staff and 
local artisans. Individual differences, strengths and talents were recognized 
through the following events: The Ralph Wheelock Art Festival, Field Day, 
Hobby & Craft Night, Talent Show, Turn About Day and Book Discussion Groups. 

With the support of the Medfield Girl Scout Council, our third graders 
participated in the Thanksgiving environmental project in which an authentic 
Thanksgiving Feast was prepared in a completely natural setting. Patriotism 
was promoted through our Memorial Day observance and a special Flag Day 
musical review. 

SUMMARY 

The staff and administration of the Ralph Wheelock Primary School are 
mindful of the need to continue to assess our methods, curriculum and 
materials in order to provide the children of Medfield with an education that 
will sustain them as they approach the twenty-first century. We must, however, 



130 



be cognizant of the need to develop strong, responsible and ethical American 
citizens. This can only be accomplished if the entire community clearly makes 
a commitment to set high standards for our schools, local government and the 
quality of life in our community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RlchaAd M. FJXzpa&vLck 

Principal 

REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES 

DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is my pleasure to submit the department report for the year ending 
December 31, 1986. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The census indicated below shows a decrease in the special needs popula- 
tion in all age groups. This is partially due to our offering Adaptive 
Physical Education as a regular education service as of September 1986. In 
recent years, youngsters requiring such services from physical educators were 
placed on educational plans. This decline in the numbers of youngsters re- 
quiring special education cannot be interpreted as a trend at this time. We 
will need to study these figures for at least another year. 



Students 


December 1 


., 1985 


December 1, 1986 


Ages 3-5 


23 




17 


Ages 6-17 


221 




213 


Ages 18-21 


13 


Total 


2 




257 


232 Total 



As a result of a grant, we hired an early childhood consultant last 
winter. After weeks of visiting many quality special education programs for 
pre-school youngsters and further analyzing the needs of our youngsters in 
this age group who were placed in collaborative programs, we decided to 
develop Medfield Early Childhood Services (MECS) . Mrs. Terrie Sull's ideas 
and expertise were invaluable, not only in designing the Memorial School 
classroom space, but in program and curriculum development. 

The lowered enrollment in collaborative placements indicated below 
resulted when we brought youngsters back to our own Medfield programs. To 
date and without exception, we are pleased with the progress these children 
are making with the assistance of our own highly qualified staff. 



131 



December 1, 1985 
MECS 

Collaborative 21 

Private Day 2 

Residential 



Decemb 


er 1. 


, 1986 




3 






15 






1 













18 


Total 



23 Total 

In an attempt to provide quality in-service training and prevention 
programs for parents and staff, our department used grant funds: 

(1) To bring Mr. Jim Trelease to our community to speak about the 
importance of reading aloud to children of all ages. 

(2) To improve communications between parents and their children through 
the STEP Program workshops offered to the parents of special needs 
children by Mrs. Dawn Sockol, psychologist/case manager for our 
department. 

(3) To provide training for parents of pre-school youngsters and nursery 
school teachers regarding early childhood development. These 
presentations were made by Mrs. Sull and Mrs. Mia Braun, speech and 
language clinician. 

HEALTH SERVICES 



The emphasis of school health in our system continues to focus on ser- 
vices, education and a healthy school environment. Last spring we experienced 
an increase of chicken pox in our system while all other communicable 
conditions remained relatively low in incidence. 

With the assistance of the Lions Club, Dr. Galeucia and Dr. Meagher as 
well as the volunteer efforts of our school nurses, 110 pre-kindergarten 
youngsters participated in the annual vision and hearing clinic last March. 
During the fall, a similar screening was conducted in each of our schools. 
Once again, we are most appreciative for the assistance of trained volunteer 
parents who assisted our nurses with the school screenings. 

The Impedance Analyzer continues to be an invaluable tool in detecting 
middle ear problems common to young children. Physicians have verified the 
accuracy of this device after receipt of our referrals. 

Postural screening in Grades 5, 6, 8 and 9 took place last spring. Nine- 
teen children were referred to their physicians with physical abnormalities 
noted in three cases and continued follow-up recommended in an additional 
seventeen cases. 

Our school nurses have participated in continuing education seminars 
sponsored by area hospitals and associations. In turn, pertinent information 
was presented to teachers in an effort to work hand-in-hand with teachers to 
assist all students to develop their full potential in a healthy and safe 
educational environment. 

GUIDANCE 

All counselors continue to see students individually and in small groups 
though the frequency of working in a small group is contingent upon the 
schedule and assignments of the guidance counselor. 

132 



The A.C.E.'s computer remains in operation in the guidance suite at the 
High School. This invaluable service assists high school students in making 
career choices and selecting colleges. We continue to be grateful to parent 
volunteers who assist Middle School students in accessing this computer in- 
formation. It is also available for use by any Medfield resident. 

As a result of reorganization at the secondary level, there are now 2-3/5 
counselors at the High School and 1-1/5 counselors at the Middle School. 
Elementary school youngsters receive guidance or psychological services from 
1-2/5 staff. 

PERSONNEL 

Mr. William Meehan resigned his position as guidance counselor to work 
with the S.A.D.D. organization. Consequently, Mrs. Susan Stegall, formerly 
the Tri-Valley Collaborative psychologist, has been hired to work full-time 
at the Ralph Wheelock School. 

Mrs. Claudia Michael s-Brod sky had been assigned to work within the Tri- 
Valley Collaborative in recent years. She has been reassigned to work in our 
Dale Street School resource room. Mrs. Cheryl Dolan has continued her matern- 
ity leave this year while Mrs. Karen Campbell has moved to the Midwest, thus 
vacating her speech and language position for Mrs. Carol Amato. 

Mrs. Anna Floser, our office computer operator/secretary, is now the 
Food Services Director for the system. 

Ms. Julie Gallagher is our half-time teacher of young children with 
special needs who works with the youngsters in our MECS Program at Memorial 
School. 

I wish to take this opportunity to recognize the efforts, services and 
talents of the volunteer parents, paraprof essional and professional staff 
who contribute daily to the successes of this department. I am appreciative 
also of the cooperation and support of the parents, School Committee members, 
and administrators in assisting us in the provision of special services for 
the young people of our educational community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

lOAjy E. LamboAt 

Director of Pupil Services 

REPORT OF THE TRI-VALLEY 
COLLABORATIVE 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I want to thank you for giving me an opportunity to serve you as the 
Director of the Tri-Valley Collaborative. Our enrollment is fifty-one 
students from our member towns and three students from non-member towns. 
Therefore, our total enrollment is fifty-four. Of the fifty-four students, 
there are currently five Medfield students. 



133 



The Tri-Valley Collaborative serves a diverse population of special needs 
students. The continuum of services which the Collaborative offers includes 
a Primary Developmentally Delayed class, which as been housed at the Dale 
Street School in Medfield. There are nine students in the classroom with 
Barbara Jenkins as the teacher and two assistant teachers. 

The Tri-Valley Collaborative continuum also offers services for Develop- 
mentally Delayed students at the Medway Junior High School in a Pre-Vocational 
I level and a Vocational II level at Medway Senior High School. Both Pre- 
Vocational and Vocational Programs have an Occupational Education component. 
The Vocational Education program at the Medway Senior High School is called 
"C.H.O. I.C.E. S." and offers three areas for students to enhance the Pre- 
Vocational skills that were begun in Level I, namely: Grounds and Buildings; 
Food Service; and Business and Clerical. Students are placed in on-site work 
experiences and transported by van to work sites in the community. In this 
way, our students are given the opportunity to develop necessary Pre-Vocational 
skills, in order to succeed at job work sites. The C.H.O. I.C.E. S. curriculum 
requires commitment and caring on the part of the Tri-Valley Collaborative 
staff, in order to offer our special needs students the support they need in 
order to enter the world of work. 

Tri-Valley Collaborative also offers a Middle School level Learning Dis- 
abilities class in Holliston and two classes, for Social-Emotional Adjustment 
(S.E.A.). One S.E.A. class is located at the Miller Elementary school and the 
other class is located at Holliston High School. 

The Tri-Valley Collaborative works to respond to the needs of our member 
towns and to develop programs which serve your students. 

The success of students in the member towns' schools is due to the support 
and cooperation of the building administrators and staff members. At Dale 
Street School we are grateful to Frank Hoffman, the faculty and staff members. 

Mr. Thomas Reis, Superintendent of Schools, is a member of Tri-Valley 
Collaborative' s Board of Superintendents, and Ms. Lois Lambert, Director of 
Pupil Services, meets with the Collaborative Special Education Administrators 
Advisory Group. 

The continued cooperation of Mr. Reis and Ms. Lambert and the Medfield 
School Committee assists our efforts to provide quality special needs programs. 
We are grateful to all. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Judith B. Golub 
Director 



134 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my second report as the Medfield Public Schools' 
Director of Athletics for the year ending December 31, 1986. The interscholas- 
tic athletic programs at the High School and Middle School continue to provide 
a very positive, competitive atmosphere for Medfield students while at the 
same time recognizing academic priorities. I believe our program offers a 
classroom on the field, on the ice, in the gym. We offer a place where not 
only athletic skills are being taught but the skills necessary for a success- 
ful life: organization, commitment, achievement, self-respect, self-control 
and compassion. 

Boys and girls inter scholastic teams were fielded at all levels during 
the past year . Following is the athletic coaching staff by season : (FALL) 
Cheerleading - Georgeanne Iverson-Kelley; Cross Country - Steven Astle; Field 
Hockey - varsity, Loretta Fahey; Field Hockey - assistant varsity, Whitney 
Hagins; Field Hockey - Freshman, Adele Hardy; Football - varsity, Thomas Dubie; 
Football - assistant varsity, David Gibbs and Jeffrey Denman; Football - junior 
varsity, Michael Slason; Football - Freshman, Joseph Farroba and William Young; 
Soccer (boys) - varsity, Robert Kennedy; Soccer (boys) - assistant varsity, 
William Pope; Soccer (girls) - varsity, Patricia Scarsciotti; Soccer (girls) - 
assistant varsity, Susan Cowell; Volleyball - varsity, Jonathan Kirby; Volley- 
ball - assistant varsity, Lynda Bannon. (WINTER) Basketball (boys) - 
varsity, Joseph Farroba; Basketball (boys) - assistant varsity, Jonathan 
Kirby; Basketball - Freshman, Ronald Frost; Basketball (girls) - varsity, 
Thomas Cowell; Basketball (girls) - assistant varsity, Susan Cowell; Basket- 
ball - Freshman, Loretta Fahey; Ice Hockey - varsity, James Morgan; Winter 
Track - varsity, Jeffrey Denman; Winter Track - assistant varsity, Steven 
Astle; Cheerleading - Georgeanne Iver son-Kelly. (SPRING) Baseball - varsity, 
Jonathan Kirby; Baseball - assistant varsity, Richard Nickerson; Baseball - 
Freshman, Joseph Farroba; Softball - varsity, Suzanne Moulton; Softball - 
assistant varsity, Judith Noble; Softball - Freshman, Martin Therrien; Tennis 
(boys) - varsity, Richard Connolly; Tennis (girls) - varsity, Judith Coppola; 
Track and Field (boys) - varsity, Jeffrey Denman; Track and Field (girls) - 
varsity, Todd Miller; Track and Field - assistant (both), Steven Astle; Track 
and Field - Middle School, Robert Ammon; Track and Field - assistant, William 
Young; Certified Athletic Trainer - 3 seasons, Lynda Bannon. 

All of our interscholastic teams participate in the Tri-Valley League 
which consists of Ashland, Bellingham, Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, 
Medfield, Medway, Millis and Westwood. The Tri-Valley League is highly com- 
petitive in all sports with representative teams consistently performing well 
in post season tournament play. Medfield placed 8th for all schools in Eastern 
Massachsuetts Division III in competition for the prestigious Dalton Award 
given annually by the Boston Globe. Criteria involved is based upon winning 
percentages of both our boys and girls teams in all sports for the school 
year 1985-1986. To my knowledge this is the best Medfield finish in the over 
twelve years the award has been presented. 

We begin our athletic highlights for 1986 with what was a very successful 
winter season. In his 10th and last season, Jim Morgan led the hockey team 
to their best ever (14-5-1) season record. Our winter track team boasted 

135 



a fine 3-2-1 record and qualified several athletes for the state meet. Both 
our boys and girls basketball teams had outstanding seasons culminating in 
playing in a "doubleheader" to over three thousand people in the sectional 
championships. The Big Blue were TVL champions at 15-1 and the girls became 
only the third Medfield team to ever capture a sectional championship. Both 
Joe Farroba and Tom Cowell were named Boston Globe Coach of the Year Division 
III. 

The spring of 1986 brought a Medfield "first" in inter scholastic compe- 
tition. Our softball team, after compiling an 18-0 league record (and a TVL 
championship) advanced all the way to the State Finals in Division III, Led 
by Tri-Valley League M.V.P. and Boston Herald All-Scholastic Karen McQuillen, 
they went where no Medfield team had gone before. A special congratulations 
to Suzanne Moulton and Judy Noble for a job well done! Our girls tennis team 
enjoyed their finest season in several years, going 11-4 and qualifying for 
post season play. The boys track team, with over 30 members, was outstanding, 
setting several school records during the spring. Our girls team finished 
with a best ever 5-2 mark. Wanda Catenacci in the 100 meter dash and the 
4x100 meter relay team won the Eastern Mass Class D Championship. 

The fall of 1986 brought several new faces to our coaching staff. First 
year football coach Tom Dubie led Medfield to its finest season (7-3-0) since 
1977. A good number of returning lettermen along with players coming up from 
an undefeated junior varsity (9-0-1) indicates a strong 1987. Another first 
year coach, Bob Kennedy, led the soccer Warriors to their twelfth tournament 
appearance in the past fourteen years. John Thompson finished his career as 
the all-time M.H.S. leader in goals scored. Former Medfield runner Steve 
Astle in his first year guided the cross country team to a strong 4-3 record. 
Highlight of the season was a victory over Dover-Sherborn for the first time 
in 12 years? Girls soccer again qualified for tournament play out of the very 
strong T.V.L. girls soccer league. Coach Pat Scarsciotti reached the 100 win 
plateau in a late season victory over King Philip. Our field hockey team went 
undefeated at 13-0-3 and participated in the M.I. A. A, Tournament for the 
second year in a row. A record six girls were named All League Players (along 
with Coach Loretta Fahey) , led by Boston Herald All-Scholastic Michelle Cargen. 
Our talented but tough-luck volleyball team just missed (one game) the tourn- 
ament for the second year in a row. 

Our annual sports recognition evenings in March and May were well attend- 
ed and included many outstanding presentations on the part of our coaching 
staff. We added, for the first time, a November evening to recognize our fall 
athletes only. It was a resounding success and "played" to an overflow crowd. 
The annual athletic banquet sponsored by the Medfield School Boosters was 
held in late May with David MacGillivary as the guest speaker. At the banquet, 
in addition to the M.V.P. awards, Deborah Glew and Brian Garrison were named 
the 1985-86 Scholar Athletes. At graduation exercises Moira McCabe and Roger 
Wheeler were the recipients of the Booster Spirit Awards. The Robert Porack 
Memorial Scholarship in boys basketball was awarded to Rob Hyland. 

The Tri-Valley All-Star selections for 1986 are as follows: Boys Basket- 
ball, Dan Howell, Rob Hyland, Mike Rogers; Girls Basketball, Karen McQuillen, 
Joan Bruno; Ice Hockey, Tim Morgan, Tim Hallet; Winter Track, Rich Everbeck, 
Todd Farrell; Baseball, Jon Klenk, Chuck Sullivan; Softball, Deb Glew, Karen 
McQuillen, Jean Shapiro, Michelle DeVasto, Courtney Peck; Boys Tennis, Dan 
Howell; Girls Tennis, Toni Burrow, Laurie Cooley, Ann Palacio; Boys Track, 
Rich Everbeck, Todd Farrell, Joe Miceli; Girls Track, Wanda Catenacci, Ashley 
Berry, Jackie Davis, Lauren Brown; Cross Country, Jeremy Tissot; Field Hockey, 
Michelle Cargen, Jen Gregg, Cathy Astle, Cheryl Oppenheim, Heather Carreiro, 
Betsy Dugan; Football, Joe Miceli, T.J. Madsen, Mark Govoni, Erich Fleming, 

136 



Matt Taylor, Todd Farrell; Boys Soccer, John Thompson, Scott Berkley; Girls 
Soccer, Cindy Powers, Kerry O'Brien; Volleyball, Linda Miller. 

During the spring the Athletic Department ran a fundraiser to help equip 
a much needed physical education/athletics weight facility at the High School. 
Through the students' involvement, several generous donations from Medfield 
residents and organizations and cooperation from School Administration, we now 
have a room of which we can truly be proud. 

I. would be remiss if I did not mention the support our cheerleaders give 
to the teams, most notably our football, soccer, basketball and ice hockey 
programs. The girls work long hours perfecting their routines for games and 
are actively involved in the planning of our rallies and Homecoming. 

It is my pleasure to report that again close to 60% of our entire student 
body participated in interscholastic athletics during the school year. This 
is perhaps the most impressive statistic that I can give. Participation is 
alive and well in Medfield. 

So concludes my second annual Report of the Athletic Director. I thank 

the athletes, coaching staff, administration and the Medfield School Boosters 

for the support and confidence given me in my first full year ending December 
31, 1986. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomcu E. CoweM. 
Director of Athletics 

REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD ADULT 
EDUCATION PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

January 21, 1986 was the beginning of the second semester of the 1985-86 
Adult Education Program. A total of fifteen classes in twelve different 
courses were continued by the Director. The courses were Driver Education, 
Slimnastics, Aerobics, Painting, Word Processing, Bridge, Golf, Stained Glass, 
Gym (men), Wood working, Microwave Cooking, Flower Arrangement, Computer 
Science and Color Analysis. All courses were offered on Tuesday, Wednesday, 
or Thursday evenings between 7:00 and 9:30 p.m. 

The 1986-87 Adult Education Program has an initial offering of twenty- 
six different courses. Sixteen different courses were established with three 
courses in Driver Education and two in Aerobics. Two hundred and ninety- 
seven adults registered and were enrolled in the program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Cuoco 

Director 

137 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL 
LUNCH PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit my first Annual Report for the 
Food Services Department for the year ending December 31, 1986, 

I was temporarily placed in this position in August and permanently 
appointed in December 1986. It is a very challenging position encompassing a 
great deal of responsibility for the nutrition of the students and the 
balancing of the Food Services Department budget. Each year with rising food, 
supply and labor costs and decreasing State and Federal aid, as well as the 
increased cost of government commodities, the budget becomes more of a prob- 
lem. This year for the first time since 1981 lunch prices were increased for 
students by 5£ per meal and by 5c per carton of milk, with adult prices being 
increased also. Student meals are subsidized by Federal and State reimburse- 
ment. No subsidy is available for adult purchases; therefore, adults must 
pay 100% of the costs involved. The price of a full school lunch is still 
your best food bargain. Where else can a student purchase a well-balanced 
meal for less than a dollar, or can an adult purchase a meal for less than the 
cost of a sandwich alone anywhere else! 

Food Lunch Program Income January 1 to December 31, 1986 : $212,217.69 

Food Lunch Program Expenses January 1 to December 31, 1986 : 213,364.18 

(Food/Supplies - $108,662.93; Labor - $104,701.25) 

Participation January 1 to December 31, 1986 : Student Lunches Purchased - 

134,413 

Average Participation Percent - 

50% 

The continued support the School Lunch Program receives is attributed to 
"Specialty Days" (Stuf f-a-Spud, Build-a-Burger, Deli Day, "All You Can Eat" 
Spaghetti, etc.). To further increase participation, I plan to set up 
regular meetings with various student groups and school principals to hear 
their needs and concerns regarding the School Lunch Program. Also, per 
special request, Ethnic Days will be introduced to the "Specialty Days" list 
in January 1987 . 

This year the staff in-serviced themselves on the various duties of the 
three kitchen positions. Another in-service is being planned in March for a 
presentation on the effects of diet to heart disease by the American Heart 
Association and on fire safety in the kitchens by Fire Chief Ryan. 

I look forward to this being another good year for the School Lunch 
Program and I trust the "Battle of the Food Services Budget" will be won in 
our favor so that we will remain self-supporting as in the past. 

I wish to thank the cafeteria staff members for all the extra assistance, 
support and cooperation they have given me during my transition period, with 
a special note of thanks to my Food Transfer Man, Charles Kenney, for all his 

138 



special help. Without these people, the program would not be such a success. 

I also would like to thank the members fo the School Committee, Mr. Reis 
Mr. Hogan, the secretarial staff, custodial staff and all the cafeteria sub- 
stitute workers for their assistance and support. Many thanks also to the 
students and staff who support our program by their participation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anna L, F£c-6e/i 

Food Services Director 




ORIGINAL RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 
Photo of painting by Walter Frank 



139 



TOWN CLERKS REPORT 
VITAL STATISTICS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1986 



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151 



TOWN WARRANT 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NORFOLK_,SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, greet- 
ings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and warn the in- 
habitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in 
town affairs, to meet at the Amos Clark Kingsbury School in said Medfield on 
Monday, the thirteenth day of January A. D. 1986 at 7:30 P.M. then and there 
to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
available funds a sum of money for use in the Insurance 
155-00 account, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $15,000 be trans- 
ferred from free cash to the insurance 
155-00 account. 

ARTICLE £'. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the 
balance of funds appropriated for the purpose of constructing 
a well and pumping station pursuant to Article £0 of the An- 
nual Town Meeting, of 1981, a sum of money for the purpose of 
reconditioning well number 4, or do or act anything in rela- 
tion thereto. 

(Water and Sewage Board) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of $6,500 from 

the balance of funds appropriated pursuant to 
Article £0 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1981 
for the purpose of reconditioning well number 
4. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to abandon Clark 
Road from Station 10+0 to Station l£+£0, or do or act any- 
thing in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the town abandon Clark Road from Sta- 
tion 10+0 to Station l£+£0, and that the Selectmen 
be authorized and directed to execute and file all 
necessary documents for that purpose. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept an equal 
educational opportunity grant for fiscal year 1986 in the 
amount of $£7, £84.00, under the provisions of General Laws 
Chapter 70A, Section 5 as inserted by Chapter 188 of the Acts 
of 1985; said grant shall be expended by the Tri-County Re- 
gional School District Committee for the direct service ex- 
penditures, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Tri-County Regional 
Vocational Technical School District) 



152 



VOTE: Voted to accept an equal educational opportunity 

grant for fiscal year 1986 under the provisions of 
General Laws Chapter 70ft, Section 5 as inserted by 
Chapter 138 of the ftcts of 1985 to be expended by 
the Tri -County Regional School District Committee 
for direct service expenditures 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to approve the ac- 
ceptance by a majority vote of the Tri -County Regional Voca- 
tional School District Committee of the provisions of Section 
13 of Chapter 188 of the ftcts of 1985 of the Massachusetts 
Great and General Court, providing for professional develop- 
ment grants, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Tri -Count y Re g i ona 1 
Vocational Technical School District) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town approve the acceptance by a 

majority vote of the Tri-County Regional Voca- 
tional School District Committee of the provisions 
of Section 13 of Chapter 188 of the ftcts of 1985 
of the Massachusetts Great and General Court, pro- 
viding for Professional Development grants. 

Yes 418 
No 53 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorise the 
Medfield School Committee to apply for and accept any funding 
which may be available to the Town by accepting the provi- 
sions of Chapter 188, Section 13, of the Acts of 1985. Any 
such grant so made shall be deposited by the treasurer with 
interest to be used for educational purposes, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that the town accept the provisions of 

Chapter 188, Section 13, of the Acts of 1985, and 
to authorise the Medfield School Committee to ap- 
ply for and accept any funding which may be avail- 
able to the town by accepting the provisions of 
that section. Any such grant so made shall be 
deposited by the Treasurer to be expended by the 
School Committee without further appropriation for 
teacher compensation. 

Yes 410 
No 56 

The meeting was dissolved at 10:00 P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, 
in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, fourteen days at 
least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 



153 



Given under our hands this £6th day of December ft. D. Nineteen Hundred and 
Ei ghty-Fi ve. 

a Robert J. Larkin, Chairman 
a William F. Nourse, Clerk 
a Ann B. Thompson 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



Norfolk, SS. 

PURSUANT TO THE WITHIN WARRANT, I have notified and warned the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Medfield by posting up attested copies of the same at 
five public places fourteen days before the date of the meetings, as within 
directed. 



s Robert D. Roy, Constable 



A True Copy attest: 
a Nancy J. Preston 
Town Clerk 



154 



Norfolk, ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greet- 
ings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in the elections and 
in Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Mon- 
day, the thirty-first day of March, A. D. 1986 at 6:00 A.M., then and there 
to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by 
ballot, viz: 



One Moderator, one Library Trustee and one member of the 
Park and Recreation Committee, all for one year. 

One Tax Collector, one Assessor, one Selectman, two members 
of the Board of Trustees of the Public Library, two members 
of the School Committee, two members of the Park and 
Recreation Commission, one member of the Housing Authority, 
all for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board for five years. 

QUESTION OF PUBLIC POLICY - OVERRIDE OF PROPOSITION 2 1/8 



Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to assess an 
additional $325,000. in real estate and personal property 
taxes for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 19B6? 

YES NO 

If 2/3 (two-thirds) of the persons voting on this 
question vote "yes", the Town may assess a total tax 
levy for the fiscal year 1987 of 102-1/2'/. of the 1986 
total levy, plus $325,000. in addition to any other 
increases allowed by law. 

The polls shall be closed at 8:00 P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-eighth of April, A. D. , 1986 commencing at 7:30 P.M. 
the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School 
gymnasium in said Medfield viz: 



155 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given unto our hands this fourth day of March, A.D. Nineteen Hundred and 
Eighty-six. 

b Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 

s Robert J. Larkin, Clerk 

b William F. Nourse 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Norfolk, ss March 21 1986 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and 
for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not 
less than five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days 
before the time of holding the meeting. 



s George W. Kingsbury 
Constable of Medfield 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



s Nancy J. Preston 
Town Clerk 



156 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

TOWN ELECTION 

March 31, 1986 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with 
the reading of the warrant and the swearing on of the election workers 
present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in working order, 
specimen ballots posted, voting list was displayed and instruction to the 
voters were posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts: 

Anna Murphy, Warden 

PRECINCT 1. Mabel le Maguire, Clerk 

PRECINCT £. Emmy Mitchell, Clerk 

PRECINCT 3. Edna Hinkley, Clerk 

PRECINCT 4. Katherine Buchanan, Clerk 

TELLERS: Adelaide Cochrane, Nancy Munroe, Beverly Hallowell, Gail Rad, 

Virginia Murley, Margaret O'Brien, Beorgia Karafotias, Jesse 
Port man, Leonard Anes, Eleanor Anes, Dorothy Sumner, John 
Fernandes, Sheila Roy, Nancy Franke, Patricia Rioux, Elmer 
Portman, James Preston, Irene 0' Toole, and Judy Plank. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 2,826. There was 28 absentee ballots 
Total Registered Voters numbered 6139. 46# of voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as fol- 
lows: 

PRECINCT 
12 3 4 TOTAL 



MODERATOR (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 
Ralph C. Co pel and 
Blanks 



SELECTMAN (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 
Ann B. Thompson 
Blanks 



COLLECTOR (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 
Nancy J. Preston 
Blanks 



442 515 710 540 2207 
107 146 216 150 619 



410 500 675 505 2090 
139 161 251 185 736 



467 561 758 577 2363 
82 100 168 113 463 



2826 



2826 



2826 



157 



ASSESSOR (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 
Susan Thornton 
Blanks 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three years) VOTE FOR TWO 
John Merck, Jr. 
Gay D' Amaro 
William Hajjar 
Blanks 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES (three years) VOTE FOR TWO 
Michael Howard 
Richard Fitzpatrick 
Blanks 



LIBRARY TRUSTEE (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 
Barbara Stevenson 
Blanks 



PRECINCT 

1 £ 3 4 

425 534 693 579 

124 127 233 111 



252 277 493 310 

284 419 458 369 

369 431 573 475 

193 195 328 226 



380 473 620 485 
413 494 664 503 
305 355 568 392 



421 508 670 537 
128 153 256 153 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 

Mary V. Oil lis 418 529 706 538 

Blanks 131 132 220 152 



PLANNING BOARD (five years) VOTE FOR ONE 
Joseph Codispoti 
Blanks 
Scattered 



HOUSING AUTHORITY (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 
Mark 0' Connor 
Willard Roy 
Blanks 



QUESTION 



YES 

NO 

Blanks 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 



101 177 254 163 
444 483 667 527 
4 1 5 



239 264 416 268 
183 247 249 249 
127 150 261 173 



193 238 376 283 

347 411 534 396 

9 12 16 11 



TOTAL 

2231 
595 



2826 



1332 

1530 

1848 

942 



1958 
2074 
1620 



2136 
690 



5652 



5652 



2826 



2191 
635 



695 

2119 

12 



1187 
928 
711 



1090 

1688 

48 



2826 



2826 



2826 



2826 



s Nancy J. Preston 
A true copy attest 



158 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FOR THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS 

April £8, 1986 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:45 P.M. at the 
Amos Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium after ascertaining that a quorum 
was present. Deborah G. Mustafaoglu lead those present in the singing of 
the National Anthem after the Salute to the flag. 

Following the reading of the service of the Warrant for the Meeting, as 
well as a review of the procedural rules by the Moderator, the following ac- 
tion was taken on the articles appearing in the Warrant. 

NOTE: 

The action taken on all articles will be recorded in their regular 
sequence regardless of the order on which they were voted. 

The meeting was briefly adjourned and a budget hearing for the use of 
Revenue Sharing Funds was held by the Selectmen at 8:00 P.M. The amount in 
the fund was on March 1, 1986 $92,773.40 with another $47,416 anticipated. 
It was recommended that $115,000 be used for the Insurance Budget. 

The following resolution was presented by Selectman Robert J. Larkin 
for the Board of Selectmen and subsequently unanimously voted: 

WHEREAS, Proposition 2 l/£ has created severe financial problems for the 
Town of Medfield 

WHEREAS, General Revenue Sharing is scheduled to be reduced and that the 
Town will lose $67,840 in fiscal year 1987 and 

WHEREAS, The State has proposed to replace those losses by only $6,784 or 
10* and 

WHEREAS, Other cities and towns would receive up to 90* of those Revenue 
Sharing losses and 

WHEREAS, The Massachusetts Municipal Association is projecting surplus of 
over $500,000,000. in fiscal year 1987 and 

WHEREAS, There is a state law mandating a 40* return of growth taxes (in- 
come, business and sales tax) to the cities and towns and 

WHEREAS, The Governor also pledged during the last gubernatorial election 
to return that 40* of growth taxes to the cities and towns and 

WHEREAS, According to the Massachusetts Municipal Association, the accumu- 
lated losses to the cities and towns because of the lack of this 
commitment now amounts to $358, 000, 000 and 

WHEREAS, The state budget increased 10.5* and 13.6* in the last two years 
and 

WHEREAS, The state budget is going up 14.9* next fiscal year and 

WHEREAS, The city and town municipal budgets in the aggregate increased by 
3.06* and 8.5* in the last two years, 



159 



NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That the Town of Medfield requests the 
Governor, its State Senator and State Representative to do every- 
thing in their power to make sure that the state returns to the 
cities and towns the actual 40% of growth taxes which by law is 
rightfully theirs and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Town of Medfield receive the same percent- 
age of its General Revenue Sharing losses as any other city or 
town up to 100*. 



A report by the Warrant Committee was presented. 

The following articles were passed on the consent calendar: 2, 3, 4, 5, 
6, 7, and 8. 



ARTICLE 2: To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the sev- 
eral Town Officers for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted to accept the reports of the several Town Officers for 
the past year. The vote was unanimous. 4/26 

ARTICLE 3: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in an- 
ticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 198S; in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and 
to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in ac- 
cordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Town Treasurer with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
July 1, 1986; in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 
4/28 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that 
office. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Collector to use all means 

in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to 
that office. 4/26 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Cemetery Commis- 
sion to appoint one of its members as Cemetery Foreman and one of its mem- 
bers as Cemetery Laborer at the salary set out in the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Cemetery Commission to 
appoint one of its members as Cemetery Foreman and one of 
its members as Cemetery Laborer at the salary set out in 
the Personnel Administration Plan. 4/28 



160 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums 
as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, 
the interest thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

Ames, Harold &• Martha $ 600.00 

Colello, James R. 150.00 

Procop, Thomas & Mildred 600.00 

Noron, Robert T. 150.00 

Thayer, Horace M. 150.00 

Jackson, Mildred & Arthur 300.00 

Hinkley, Daniel 100.00 

Wills, Arthur & Doris 800.00 

Carroll, Frank & Eleanor 400.00 

MacKay, Edward & Rita 100.00 

Tedford, Robert B. 150.00 

Greenman/Renoni £00.00 

McGrath, Allan 150.00 

Meager, Winifred 10.00 

Brewster, Kenneth & Cecilia 150.00 

Dugan, F. Joseph 400. 00 

Rieger, William & Norma 200.00 

Kosc, Michael & Maryann 800.00 

Taggart, Victor & Martha 300.00 

Belmont, John & Georgia 600.00 

O'Brien, James & Margaret 600.00 

Connors, Kathleen 300.00 

Harding, Donald H. 200.00 

Ray, Junior W. 400.00 

Cheney, Barbara 400. 00 

Haney, Cecelia M. 800.00 

Blinn, Frederick W. 800.00 

Lamb, John & Lois 200.00 

Crooker, Mina 200.00 

Monaco, Richard 600.00 

Tascione, Camillo A. 400.00 



VOTE: Voted to accept the named sums as set forth in the warrant. 4/28 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Sec- 
tion 26G of Chapter 148 of the Massachusetts General Laws providing for ad- 
equate systems of automatic sprinklers in buildings, other than used for 
residential purposes, which exceed 7,500 square feet and which were con- 
structed after July 1, 1983, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

VOTE: 

Voted to accept the provisions of Section 26G of 
Chapter 148 of the Massachusetts General Laws. As set 
out in the warrant. The vote was unanimous. 

4/28 



161 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town bylaws, Article 
II, Section £0 providing for obtaining bids for contracts by substituting 
"Four Thousand ($4,000.)" for the words, "Two Thousand ($2,000.) dollars", 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Board of Selectmen) 



VOTE: 



Voted to amend the Town bylaws, Article 11, section SO 
providing for obtaining bids for contracts by substitut- 
ing "Four Thousand <*4, 000)" for the words "Two Thou- 
sand (*2,000)" dollars. 

4/ea 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to close the following unexpended 
appropriation balances to the General Fund Unreserved Fund Balance: 

North Street, Article 11, ATM 1975 $ 1,452.36 
Orchard St. Bridge Design, Article 14, 

ATM 1978 7,721.00 

Police Console, Article 9, ATM 1978 630.15 

Regional Refuse, Article 27, ATM 1974 939.92 

Land Acquisition, Article 1, STM 1965 5,374.83 

Philips Street, Article 5, STM 1965 2,348.70 

St and pipe, Article 13, STM 1977 440.82 

Rolling Lane Easement, Article 1, STM 1980 830.00 

Sewer Construction, Article 9, ATM 1976 and 

Article 23, ATM 1977 1,646.33 

Noon Hill, Article 10, ATM 1974 756.25 
Elm Street Land Purchase, Article 25, 

ATM 1979 3,384.86 

Wood End Lane, Article 6, STM 1979 21,029.15 

Fire Truck, Article 46, ATM 1983 5, 000. 00 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the unexpended appropriation balances 
as set forth in the warrant be transferred to the General 
Fund Unreserved Fund balance, totalling $51,554. 37. 

4/2B 



162 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary arid compensation 
of the following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Treasurer, 
Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, 
Collector of Taxes, Park and Recreation Commission, Planning Board and 
Housing Authority, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to set the salaries of the elected officials as follows: 

Moderator 0. 

Housing Authority 0. 

Town Clerk 8,750. 
Tax Collector 11,500. 

Treasurer 9, 300. 

Selectman, Chairman 700. 

Selectman, Clerk £75. 
Selectman, 3rd Member 675. 

Assessor, Chairman 750. 

Assessor, Clerk 750. 
Assessor, 3rd Member 750. 

School Committee 0. 

Library Trustees 0. 

Planning Board 0. 

Park & Recreation 0. 



163 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Adminis- 
tration Plan, effective July 1, 1986, to read as follows: 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

SALARIED POSI TIONS 

Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 
Poli ce D epartment 

Police Chief 25,235 33,582 

Police Sergeant 21,894 22,775 23,880 

Police Officer/ 

Detective 17,790 18,997 20,411 21,727 

Police Officer/ 

Prosecutor 17,790 18,997 20,411 21,727 

Police Officer/ 

Photographer/ 

Fingerprinter 17,541 18,747 20,161 21,477 

Police Officer 17,191 18,397 19,811 21,127 

Dog Officer 16,518 18,002 

Streets, water and Sewer Department 
Superintendent of Public 

Works 28,591 38,123 

Fire Department 

Chief 22,906 33,630 

Executive Department 

Town Administrator 27,535 50,085 

Administrative 

Assistant 16,960 25,241 

Board of Health 
Detached Social 

Worker 17,981 22,310 

Library 

Library Director 17,808 26,768 



HOURLY POSITIONS 

Library 

Children's Librarian 7.04 8.84 9.69 

Reference Librarian 7.04 8.84 9.69 



164 



HOURL Y PAID POSITIONS 
Grade Minimum Wage Minimum 

1 3.55 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 

a 

9 
10 

li 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 

Lower rates as authorised by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts may also 
be paid. 



mum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


4.66 


4.89 


5.13 


5.42 


5.71 


4.89 


5.13 


5.42 


5.71 


6.01 


5.13 


5.42 


5.71 


6.01 


6.35 


5.42 


5.71 


6.01 


6.35 


6.65 


5.71 


6.01 


6.35 


6.65 


7.01 


6.01 


6.35 


6.65 


7.01 


7.38 


6. 35 


6.65 


7.01 


7.38 


7.76 


6.65 


7.01 


7.38 


7.76 


8. 17 


7.01 


7.38 


7.76 


8. 17 


8.61 


7.38 


7.76 


8.17 


8.61 


9.06 


7.76 


8.17 


8.61 


9.06 


9.56 


8.17 


8.61 


9.06 


9.56 


10.04 


8.61 


9.06 


9.56 


10.04 


10.58 


9.06 


9.56 


10.04 


10.58 


11. 13 


9.56 


10.04 


10.58 


11.13 


11.72 


10.04 


10.58 


11. 13 


11.72 


12.34 


10. 58 


11. 13 


11.72 


12.34 


12.98 



165 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 



GRADE 1 

Swimming Instructor 
Lifeguard Instructor 

$1113 minimum per season 
Library Aide 
Playground Counselor 
Lifeguard 

$932 minimum per season 
Intern /Trainee 
Laborer 

GRADE 2 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 3 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 4 

Clerk Typist 
Cemetery Foreman 

GRADE 5 



Library Sr. Aide 
Skilled Laborer 
Secretary 

GR ADE 6 

Col lector/Bookkeeper/ 
Secretary 

GRADE 7 

Police Matron 
Skating Supervisor 
Traffic Supervisor 

GRADE 6 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 9 

Senior Secretary 
Truck Driver 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Dispatcher 
Call Firefighters 



GRADE 10 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 11 

Light Equipment Operator 
Municipal Buildings Custodian 
Administrative Secretary 

GRADE 12 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator 
Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Ground s keeper 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator Repairman 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment 

Plant Operator — in-Charge 
Finance/Data Processing 

Supervisor 

GRADE 14 

Tree Warden/ Insect Pest Control 

GRADE 15 

Presently no jobs 

GRA DE 16 
Presently no jobs 

GRADE 17 

Street /Water /Sewer Foreman 
Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operat oi — i n-Char ge 



166 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
PORT TIME /TEMPORARY 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Assistant Waterfront Director 



De p ut y Coll ect or 

Ambulance E. M. T. 
Assistant Dog Officer 

Fir e 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Youth Coordinator 
Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veterans' Agent 

Inspecto rs 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Assistant Gas Inspector 

P I urn b i ng I ns pect or 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Assistant Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$911 per year 

$2597 to $3389 per year 

$162 to $222 per week 

$ 1 , 397 m i n i m urn per season 

Fee 

$10.60 per hour 
$1,336 per year 



$1,380 per year 
$ 464 per year 
$ 351 per year 
$ 351 per year 

$2, 936 per year 

$180 to $275 per week 

$198 to $260 per week 

$264 per year 

$637 per year 

$1, 121 per year 

$12,272 to $20,925 per year 

$5.68 to $9.17 per hour 

$3, 293 per year 

$13.12 per inspection 
Annual Minimum $2,541 
Annual Minimum $ 339 
Annual Minimum $ 702 
Annual Minimum $ 126 
Annual Minimum $2,074 
Annual Minimum $ 475 
Annual Minimum $1, 154 
Annual Minimum $ 339 
$13.12 per inspection 
$6. 89 per hour 
$13.12 per inspection 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



167 



VOTE: Voted to amend the Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule 
of the Personnel Administration Plan as follows: 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

SALARIED POSITIONS 





Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


Police Department 












Police Chief 


25,116 








33, 423 


Police Sergeant 


23, 098 


24, 028 






25, 193 


Police Officer/ 












Detective 












Police Officer/ 












Prosecutor 












Police Officer/ 












Phot ographer / 












F i nger pr i nt er 












Police Officer 


18, 137 


21,464 


20, 901 




22,289 


Dog Officer 


16,440 








17,917 


Specialist Range 


350 








1,000 



Police Officers designated as Detective, Prosecutor or Photographer/ Finger- 
printer by the Police Chief shall receive additional compensation annually 
at a rate to be determined by the Police Chief within the above Specialist 
Range. 



Streets, Mater and Sewer Department 
Superintendent of Public 

Works 28, 457 37, 943 

Fire Department 

Chief 22,798 33,471 

Executive Department 

Town Administrator 27,405 49,849 

Administrative 

Assistant 16, 880 25, 122 



Board of Health 
Detached Social 

Worker 17,611 22,205 

Library 

Library Director 17,724 26,642 



168 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 

-Odd to GRADE 4- Minibus Driver COA 
-Add to GRADE 5- Executive Director COA 

Other Grade listings are the same as printed in the warrant 

HOURLY POSITIONS 



Library 

Children's Librarian 7.02 

Reference Librarian 7.02 



8.80 
8.80 



9.65 
9.65 



HOURL Y PAID POSITIONS 

Grade Minimum wage Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 



3.55 



4.64 


4.87 


5.13 


5.40 


5.69 


4.87 


5.13 


5.40 


5.69 


5.98 


5.13 


5.40 


5.69 


5.98 


6.32 


5.40 


5.69 


5.98 


6.32 


6.63 


5.69 


5.98 


6.32 


6.63 


6.98 


5.98 


6.32 


6.63 


6.98 


7.35 


6.32 


6.63 


6.98 


7.35 


7.73 


6.63 


6.98 


7.35 


7.73 


8.13 


6.98 


7.35 


7.73 


8.13 


8.58 


7.35 


7.73 


8.13 


8.58 


9.02 


7.73 


8.13 


8.58 


9.02 


9.52 


8.13 


8.58 


9.02 


9.52 


10.00 


8.58 


9.02 


9.52 


10.00 


10.54 


9.02 


9.52 


10.00 


10.54 


11.08 


9.52 


10.00 


10.54 


11.08 


11.67 


10.00 


10.54 


11.08 


11.67 


12.29 


10.54 


11.08 


11.67 


12.29 


12.92 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 



PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Assistant Waterfront Director 



$906 per year 
92,585 to $3,373 per year 
$161 to $221 per week 
$1,390 minimum per season 



Deputy Collector 



Fee 



Ambulance E. M. T. 
Assistant Dog Officer 



$10.55 per hour 
$1,329 per year 



Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 



$1,374 per year 
$ 462 per year 
$ 349 per year 
$ 349 per year 



Youth Coordinator 
Playground Director 
Police Intern 
Registrar 
Registrar, Clerk 



$2,922 per year 
$179 to $273 per week 
$197 to $258 per week 
$263 per year 
$634 per year 



169 



SPECIAL ROTE/FEE POSITIONS 
PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Town Counsel 
Tree Climber 
Veterans' Agent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Assistant Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Assistant Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$1, 116 per year 
$12, £1 A to $20,827 per year 
$5.65 to $9.14 per hour 
$3, 278 per year 

$13.06 per inspection 
Annual Minimum $2, 529 
Annual Minimum $ 338 
Annual Minimum $ 698 
Annual Minimum $ 126 
Annual Minimum $2,065 
Annual Minimum $ 473 
Annual Minimum $1, 149 
Annual Minimum $ 338 
$13.06 per inspection 
$6. 86 per hour 
$13.06 per inspection 

4/28 



170 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of 
Positions and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan, effective 
July 1, 1386 by adding the following new categories under hourly paid posi- 
tions: 

Grade 4 Minibus Driver 

Grade 5 Executive Director, Council on Aging 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Classification of Positions 

and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan, effec- 
tive July 1, 1966 by adding the following new categories un- 
der hourly paid positions: 

Grade 4 Minibus Driver 

Grade 5 Executive Director, Council on Aging 

4/28 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Adminis- 
tration Plan, Section XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS. H. To increase the spe- 
cial detail rate for special and permanent intermittent officers from $10. 
to $14. , or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan, Section XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS. H. To increase 
the special detail rate for special and permanent intermit- 
tent officers from $10. to $14. 

4/28 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Adminis- 
tration Plan XV . SPE C IAL PAY PROVISIONS , Section E. Longevity as follows: 

"Regular full-time employees shall receive an annual 
longevity payment of $125. after 5 years' continuous 
regular full-time employment plus $25. for each additional 
year of service up to a total maximum of $500. payable on 
the 2nd pay day of December. " 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan XV. 



SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS, as follows: 
Section E. Longevity 

"Regular full-time employees shall receive an annual 
longevity payment of $125. after 5 years' continuous 
regular full-time employment plus $25. for each addi- 
tional year of service up to a total maximum of $500. 
payable on the 2nd pay day of December. " 4/28 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer 
from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other 
Town Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses 
of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1986, or such other sums 
as the Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 
108, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



171 



VOTE: Voted to raise and appropriate the following named sums 
of money to defray the departmental and other expenses 
of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1986, 
as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108: 



100-01 Selectmen 



100 


Personnel 


♦2, 050 


£00 


Operations 


6.763 


100-03 


Town Administrator 




100 


Personnel 


302, 575 


200 


Operations 


800 



8,813 



303, 375 



200 


Operations 


15, 820 






Total 100- 


-01, 03, 


04 $328, 008 


101-00 


Town Counsel 






100 


Personnel 


18,500 




200 


Operations 


2,217 


20,717 


102-00 


Treasurer 






100 


Personnel 


9,300 




200 


Operations 


2.965 


12,265 


103-00 


Tax Collector 






100 


Personnel 


11,500 




200 


Operations 


6,537 


18,037 


104-00 


Town Clerk 






100 


Personnel 


8,750 




200 


Operations 


1,605 


10, 355 


105-00 


Assessors 






100 


Personnel 


2,250 




200 


Operations 


36, 425 


38, 675 


106-00 


Planning Board 






200 


Operations 




8,000 


107-01 


Park and Rec. Administration 


100 


Personnel 


3,598 




200 


Operations 


2,720 


6,318 


107-02 


Recreation 






100 


Personnel 


25, 026 




200 


Operations 


7,045 





32,071 



172 



107-03 


Parks 




100 


Personnel 


13, 450 


200 


Operations 


-0- 



13,450 
Total 107-01, 02, 03 51,839 



108-00 Elections and Registration 
100 Personnel 1,427 
200 Operations IS, 345 



109-00 Town Hall 

100 Personnel 24,595 
200 Operations 24. 401 



110-04 Highway 

100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Capital 



110-05 Sidewalks 

110-08 Snow and Ice 

100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Capital 



110-07 Town Garage 

200 Operations 15,989 
500 Capital -0- 



17,772 



48, 996 



255, 684 




87, 720 




-0- 






343,404 




3,420 


45, 783 


, 


65,956 




-0- 





111,739 



15,989 



110-08 Equipment and Repair 

100 Personnel 47,643 
200 Operations 72,146 
500 Capital -0- 

119,789 

Total 110-04, 05, 06, 07, 08 594,341 



111-01 Police Administration 

100 Personnel 126, 880 
200 Operations 14. 100 

140, 980 

111-02 Police Operations 

100 Personnel 428, 184 
200 Operations 18,450 
500 Capital -0- 

446, 634 



173 



111-03 Cruiser 

£00 per at ions 24, 700 
500 Capital -0- 



24, 700 



111 -04 Commun i cat i oris 

200 Operat ions 8, 800 

111-05 Traffic Marking/Sign 

200 Operations 6,000 

111-06 School Traffic 

100 Personnel 16,704 
200 Operat ions 300 

17,004 
Total 111-01, 02, 03, 

04, 05, 06 644,118 

112-01 Fire Administration 

100 Personnel 37,096 
200 Operations 750 

37,846 

112-02 Fire Operations 

100 Personnel 54, 184 
200 Operat i ons 33, 6 1 5 
500 Capital -0- 

87, 799 
Total 112-01, 02 125,645 

112-03 Right to Know 

200 Operations -0- 

114-02 Tree Care 

100 Personnel 12,720 
200 Operations 9.430 

22, 150 



114-03 


Insect /Pest Control 


100 


Personnel -0- 


200 


Operations -0- 


114-04 


Dutch Elm 


100 


Personnel -0- 


200 


Operations -0- 


115-00 


Inspection Department 


100 


Personnel 21,427 


200 


Operat ions 2, 334 



23,761 



119-00 Sealer 

100 Personnel 1,116 
200 Operations 170 



1,286 



174 



120-00 Dog Officer 

100 Personnel 20,576 
200 Operations 2,415 



121-00 Civil Defense 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



122-00 Appeals 

200 Operations 

123-00 Street Lights 

200 Operations 

125-00 Board of Health 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



125-01 Outreach 

100 Personnel 16,515 
200 Operations 1.600 



130-00 Landfill 

100 Personnel 61,001 

200 Operations 138,000 

500 Capital -0- 



131-01 Sewer Department 

100 Personnel 95,901 

200 Operations 111,015 

400 Credits (4,306) 

500 Capital 2.000 



132-01 Veterans Operation 

100 Personnel 3,279 

200 Operations 8,626 

500 Capital -0- 



22,991 



2,205 




-0- 






2,205 




1,000 




47, 000 


6,134 




8,453 





14,587 



20,315 



126-00 Public Health 

200 Operations 6,050 

128-00 Mental Health 

200 Operations 9,470 

129-00 Ambulance 

100 Personnel 13, 792 
200 Operations 5,685 
500 Capital -0- 



19, 477 



199,001 



204,610 



11,905 



175 



133-02 


Grave Markers 






200 


Operations 




560 


133-00 


Memorial Day 






200 


Operations 




450 


134-00 


Council on Aging 






100 


Personnel 


16,832 




200 


Operations 


5,446 


22, 278 


135-00 


Library 






100 


Personnel 


74, 423 




200 


Operations 


37,717 




400 


Credits 


(13,844) 




500 


Repairs 


-o- 


98, 296 


140-00 


Water Department 






100 


Personnel 


100,814 




200 


Operations 


124, 060 




400 


New Service 


5,441 




500 


Capital 


7,500 


237, 815 


145-00 


Cemetery Commissi or 


i 




100 


Personnel 


19, 375 




200 


Operations 


13, 460 




400 


Credits 


(18,500) 




500 


Capital 


-0- 


14, 335 


146-00 


Conservation Commission 




200 


Operations 


2,000 




500 


Capital 


2,000 


4,000 


147-00 


Develop/ Indust Comrr 


I 




200 


Operations 




-0- 


148-00 


Historical Commissi 


on 




200 


Operations 




572 


150-01 


Town Debt - Principal 




400 


Other Charges 




455, 000 


150-02 


Town Debt - Interest 




400 


Other Charges 




179,400 


155-00 


Insurance 






200 


Operations (155,000 from 


i Revenue 








500,349 


156-00 


Unemployment Fund 






200 


Operations 




20, 000 


160-00 


Town Report 






200 


Operations 




5,000 



176 



161-00 


County Retirement 






200 


Operations 




326, 336 


162-00 


Stabilization Fund 






200 


Operations 




15, 000 


163-00 


Reserve Fund 






200 


Operations 




70, 000 


170-00 


Town Meeting 






100 


Personnel 


893 




200 


Operations 


1,800 


2,693 


171-00 


Warrant Committee 






200 


Operations 




90 


175-00 


Personnel Board 






100 


Personnel 


1,397 




200 


Operations 


275 


1,672 




Town 


Subtotal : 


4, 478, 422 



177 



Schools 

180-00 Regional Voc/Tech 

200 Operations 132,394 

8000 Vocation Education 
Other Inter government 

1000 School Administration 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

2000 Instruction 

100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

3000 Other School Services 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

4000 Plant Operations 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

7000 Acquisition of Assets 
200 Operations 

9000 Programs/Other Districts 
200 Operations 

Total School Budget 7,027,928 

School Budget was passed on April 28, 1986 

Yes 418 
No 242 



A motion to reconsider was made. As it was 10:40 the meeting was ad- 
journed to April 29, 1986 at 7:30 P.M. at the Amos Clark Kingsbury High 
School. 



178 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEET I NO 

The meeting was called to order on April £9, 1986 at 7:40 after ascer- 
taining that a quorum was present. 

A vote for reconsideration of the School Budget was defeated. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money on the fiscal 1987 tax levy, and/or transfer from available funds for 
Capital Expenditures including the following: 



Depar tment 
Cemetery 

Civil Defense 

Assessors' Department 

Planning 

Park & Recreation 

Town Hall 

Police Department 

Dog 

Library 

Highway Department 



School Department 



Selectmen 



Item 

Land Acquisition 
Storage Shed Completion 

Building 

Triennial Recertifica- 

t ion/evaluat ion 
Drainage/Watershed Study 

Tennis Court Renovation 

Gas Tank Replacement 
Town Hall Improvements 

Police Cruisers 
Computer 
Traffic Lights 

Replace Van 

Access Minuteman Database 

1 Ton Truck 

£ - 3/4 Ton Trucks 

Backhoe 

6- wheel Dump 

Sidewalk Plow 

Rocky Lane Resurfacing 

Stone seal subdivisions 

Drainage Farm & North Streets. 

Bridge Street water pipe cleaning 

Field Renovation/teachers' 

lavatories 
Handicapped lifts 

Former St. Edward's Park & Library 
Parking Spaces 



and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee and/or the Park 
and Recreation Commission be further authorized to contract with and other- 
wise treat with any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the 
cost of any capital expenditures; and that the Board of Selectmen be autho- 
rised to trade toward part of the purchase price, or sell the following: 



179 



Trade: 



1 1980 1 Ton G.M. C. 

1 1981 3/4 Ton 6. M. C. 

1 1978 Backhoe 

1 1981 3/4 Ton G. M. C. 

1 1975 F600 Ford Dump 

1 1962 Bobcat Sidewalk Plow 

£ 1983 Ford LTD Police 

Cruisers 

1 1980 Ford Dog Van 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted that the following sums be appropriated for 
capital expenditures: 



Dept. 



Item 



Planning Drainage/Watershed Study 



5, 000. 



Town Hall 


Gas tank removal & replace- 






ment 


6,000. 


Police 


Two police cruisers 


23, 800. 


Council on 






Aging 


New Van 


4,000 


Library 


Access to Minuteman 






Database 


6, 356. 


School 


Field improvements 




Dept. 


Teachers' toilet at 






Wheelock 


20,000. for both 




Handicapped access at 






Dale Street 


36, 000. 


Highway 


Equipment: 






1 3/4 ton trucks 


15, 000. 




Backhoe 


70, 000. 




6-wheel dump truck 


40, 000. 


Projects: 


Rocky Lane resurfacing 


22, 000. 




Stone seal subdivisions 


40, 000. 




Drainage at North & Farm Sts. 


10, 000. 




Bridge St. water pipe 






cleaning 


25,000. 


Town Park 


Non-decorative groundwork - 






grading, etc. 


10.000. 



and that to meet the appropriation $313,156 be raised on the 1987 
tan levy, *20, 000 be transferred from funds received from the 
state for highway purposes identified as Chapter 637, Acts of 1983 
Section 3 and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to trade 
as part of the purchase price or sell the following: 

180 



1 1981 3/4 Ton 6.M.C. 
1 1978 Backhoe 
1 1975 F600 Ford Dump 
1 1983 Ford LTD Police 

Cruiser 
1 1980 Ford Dog Van 

4/29 

ARTICLE 17. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate on the fis- 
cal 1987 tax levy and/or transfer from available funds for the purpose of 
obtaining plans and specifications for improvements to South Street from 
High Street to the Norfolk town line and for the purpose of constructing a 
28-foot roadway and sidewalk within the existing 60-foot layout and to au- 
thorize the Selectmen to treat with federal, state and other agencies to 
obtain grants and other funds as reimbursement towards the costs, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(fin amendment that read as follows was presented and failed) 

Move that we strike out the section that says 28-foot roadway and 
sidewalk within the existing 60-foot layout and substitute " a new 
road, without paved sidewalk, meeting AASHTO standards (but not 
more that 24 feet in width) 

This new road shall go on top of the existing roadway, with im- 
proved vertical alignment and extra width to be added where neces- 
sary to meet AASHTO standard and qualify for state and /or federal 
funding. A four-foot graded grass shoulder on each side, with 
significant trees to be spared, shall serve as an unpaved side- 
walk, in keeping with the scenic country road character. Stone- 
walls destroyed shall be rebuilt. 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for and 
receive the sum of $85,000 in State Highway funds for the purpose 
of designing a 28-foot roadway and sidewalks within the 60-foot 
County layout of South Street from Route 27 to the Norfolk town 
line and that for said purpose the following sums be allocated 
from available highway funds: 

Chapter 732, Acts of 1981 FY 82 allocation $11,925.58 
Chapter 191, Acts of 1982 FY 83 allocation 41,422.00 
Chapter 289, Acts of 1983 FY 84 allocation 31,641.42 
and further that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to apply for 
and receive federal and/or state funds for the construction of a 
28-foot roadway and sidewalks within the 60-foot layout of South 
Street from Route 27 to the Norfolk town line and further that the 
Board of Selectmen be authorized to enter into contracts with the 
state and/or federal government for the above purposes, and. that 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen be au- 
thorized to borrow in anticipation of receipt of state funds. 

i 

4/29 

Article 17 was brought up for reconsideration on May 6, 1986 
It was defeated and the vote stood. 

Yes 154 No 211 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:25 until May 5, 1986 at the Amos Clark 
Kingsbury High School at 7:30 P.M. 

181 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MAY 5, 1986 
The meeting was called to order at 7:50 P.M. after ascertaining that a 
quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Town Bylaws the fol- 
lowing new section under Article IV. Police Regulations: 

"Section £8. Blasting Operations . No blasting operations 
shall be conducted in the Town until all requirements of 
state law and of the Fire Chief have been complied with and 
until a survey of the condition of all property within 500 
feet of all proposed blasting sites has been made by a 
surveyor qualified, in the opinion of the Fire Chief, to 
make such a survey. The condition shall be documented on 
such forms and with such evidence, such as photographs, as 
the Fire Chief finds to be necessary. The owner or owner's 
representative of each property shall be given an opportuni- 
ty to accompany the surveyor and shall be furnished a copy 
of the documentation and evidence. The cost of the survey 
and production of the documentation shall be borne by the 
blasting operator. The survey shall include, but not be 
limited to, a record of all cracks in foundations, walls, 
floors, walks, driveways, patios and similar paved areas, 
the condition of all glass and the function of septic, sewer 
and other underground utilities. Every reasonable effort 
shall be made to locate and/or notify the owner or owner's 
representative for each structure, including inquiring of 
town officials and at neighboring premises, so that the 
surveyor may gain access to the structure and the owner or 
owner's representative shall be given reasonable opportunity 
to accompany the surveyor, including evening hours or 
weekends, if necessary. If such efforts have been made to 
locate the owners without success, the blasting operator or 
surveyor shall leave a notice at the structure in a promi- 
nent place, at least five (5) days before any blasting is 
done, two (£) of which shall be weekend days, that the 
survey is being offered and a telephone number where the 
surveyor can be reached, including on weekends or during the 
evening hours to make the necessary arrangements. No 
blasting shall be done until the Fire Chief has had an 
opportunity to review all surveys and has been given a 
complete report of all instances where access was refused or 
no owner or owner's representative could be located." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



182 



VOTE: 

Voted to add to the Town bylaws the following new 
section under Article IV Police Regulations. 

Section 28a. Preliminary Survey Before Blasting Operations . 

No blasting operations shall be conducted in the Town until 
all requirements of state law and of the Fire Chief have been 
complied with and until a survey of the condition of all property 
within 500 feet of all proposed blasting sites has been made by a 
surveyor qualified, in the opinion of the Fire Chief, to make 
such a survey. The condition shall be documented on such forms 
and with such evidence, such as photographs, as the Fire Chief 
finds to be necessary. The owner or owner's representative of 
each property shall be given an opportunity to accompany the sur- 
veyor and shall be furnished a copy of the documentation and 
evidence. The cost of the survey and production of the documen- 
tation shall be borne by the blasting operator. The survey shall 
include, but not be limited to, a record of all cracks in founda- 
tions, walls, floors, walks, driveways, patios and similar paved 
areas, the condition of all glass and the function of septic, 
sewer and other underground utilities. Every reasonable effort 
shall be made to locate and/or notify the owner or owner's repre- 
sentative for each structure, including inquiring of town offi- 
cials and at neighboring premises, so that the surveyor may gain 
access to the structure and the owner or owner's representative 
shall be given reasonable opportunity to accompany the surveyor, 
including evening hours or weekends, if necessary. If such ef- 
forts have been made to locate the owners without success, the 
blasting operator or surveyor shall leave a notice at the struc- 
ture in a prominent place, at least five (5) days before any 
blasting is done, two (2) of which shall be weekend days, that 
the survey is being offered and a telephone number where the sur- 
veyor can be reached, including on weekends or during the evening 
hours to make the necessary arrangements. No blasting shall be 
done until the Fire Chief has had an opportunity to review all 
surveys and has been given a complete report of all instances 
where access was refused or no owner or owner's representative 
could be located. 

Section 28B - Permits for Blasting Operations. 

The Fire Chief shall not issue a blasting permit under 527 
CMR 13.04(3) (a) until documentation evidencing full compliance 
with section 28A of this By-Law has been received by him, and un- 
til he is satisfied that said blasting operation can be conducted 
without risk to persons or property. 

Section 28C - Notice of Blasting Operations. 

(1) Written notice of the date, time and place when a 
blasting operation is to take place shall be given to the owners 
or occupants of all properties located within 1,000 feet of the 
blast site at least 48 hours in advance of the time when the blast 
is to occur. 



183 



(2) The Fire Chief shall be notified of the date and time 
of each blasting operation at least 24 hours prior to the blast- 
ing operation at which time the Fire Chief shall be provided with 
an affidavit signed by the permit holder indicating that the no- 
tice requirements of Article 28C(1) have been satisfied, which 
affidavit shall also specify the size of the charge to be uti- 
lized. 

Section 28D - Monitoring of Blasting Operations. 

(1) The permit holder shall place monitoring devices of a 
type approved by the Fire Chief in the immediate vicinity of any 
occupied building within 500 feet of the blast area, which said 
devices shall at a minimum be sufficient to permit a determina- 
tion of the frequency of ground vibration in cycles per second 
and the maximum amplitude of ground motion in inches at the loca- 
tions of said instruments. The instruments required by this Ar- 
ticle shall be put in place at the sole expense of the permit 
holder, and the permit holder shall, again at its sole expense, 
retain such qualified persons as may be necessary to read said 
instruments and certify the readings of same to the Fire Chief. 

(2) Within 48 hours after the completion of any blasting 
operation, the permit holder shall file with the Fire Chief an 
affidavit from a person qualified to read and interpret data re- 
corded by the instruments required by Section 28D(1) which af- 
fidavit shall set forth the frequency of ground vibration in 
cycles per second and the maximum amplitude of ground motion in 
inches at the location of each instrument required by Article 
28D(1) for each blasting operation conducted. In addition, the 
permit holder shall file with the Fire Chief, within 48 hours af- 
ter a blasting operation, a plan or map showing the location of 
each blasting operation together with the date and time when said 
blasting operation occurred so that the location of the blasting 
operation can be correlated with the data obtained from the in- 
struments required by this By-Law . Such documentation, upon fil- 
ing, shall be available for review and copying by all members of 
the general public. 

28E - Notice Immediately Prior to a Blasting Operation. 

All permit holders shall notify inhabitants in the immediate 
vicinity of the blasting operation by audible signal of a type 
approved by the Fire Chief 15 minutes in advance of each blasting 
operation. Such audible signal shall be sufficient to be heard 
by the inhabitants of property within 1,000 feet of the location 
of the blasting operation. 

28F - Revocation of Permits for Blasting Operations. 

The Fire Chief shall revoke any blasting permit issued pur- 
suant to 527 CMR 13.04(3) (a) and this By-Law in the event any 
violation of 527 CMR or this By-Law has occurred. In such case a 
blasting permit shall not be issued to the permit holder, or at 
the same blasting site, for a period of one year. The Fire Chief 
shall also revoke any blasting permit when he concludes that a 
blasting operation has caused, or is reasonably likely to cause, 
damage to property or risk of injury to persons or animals. The 
Fire Chief shall not reissue said permit until such time as he 

184 



has been presented with evidence sufficient to clearly establish 
that all reasonable precautions have been taken to prevent it. 
Notice shall be given of the revocation of any blasting permit to 
the State Fire Marshall together with a brief description of the 
cause for such revocation. 

286 - Appeals. 

Appeals from any action, or failure to act, by the Fire 
Chief hereunder shall be taken to the Board of Appeals on Zoning 
utilizing the time limits and procedures specified for appeals of 
zoning matters as specified in General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 
8, and regulations adopted by the Board of Appeals on Zoning for 
Appeals under that statute. 

5/4 

(Attorney General disapproved) 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the fol- 
lowing named streets, or parts thereof: 

Wood End Lane from Station 0+0 to Station £8+43.33 
Country Way from Station 0+0 to Station £+4.17 
Trailside Road from Station 13+50 to Station 15+4£.41 
Shawnee Road from Station 0+££. 50 to Station 9+5£. £8 
Algonquin Road from Station 5+50.00 to Station 11+75.53 
Donnelly Drive from Station 59+00.38 to Station 
46+7£. 3£ 

Dover Farm Road from Station 0+0 to Station 10+1£.£5 
Fieldstone Drive from Station 5+41.58 to Station 
6+08. 36 

Plyrnpton Circle from Station 0+0 to Station £+34.73 
Brastow Drive from Station 0+0 to Station 10+65.50 
Newell Drive from Station 0+0 to Station 4+£4. 84 
Marsh Drive from Station 0+0 to Station 8+73.93 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in 
the Order of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such 
rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements, as may be nec- 
essary to accomplish such purposes, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept as public ways the following 
named streets: 

Hood End Lane from Station 0+0 to Station 28+49.33 
Shawnee Road from Station 0+22.50 to Station 9+52.28 
Algonquin Road from Station 5+50.00 to Station 11+75.53 
Donnelly Drive from Station 59+00.38 to Station 
46+72. 32 

Dover Farm Road from Station 0+0 to Station 10+12.25 
Fieldstone Drive from Station 5+41.58 to Station 
6+08. 36 



185 



as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans re- 
ferred to in the Order of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's 
office and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, 
including drainage easements, as may be necessary to accomplish 
such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 

5/5 

ARTICLE 20. To see what sums the Town will vote to transfer from free cash 
to departmental budgets to replace extraordinary expenses caused by Hur- 
ricane Gloria, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to transfer from free cash the sum of $43,435. to the 
following departmental budgets for fiscal 1986: 

Highway 110-04 100 Account $12,570 

Highway 110-04 200 Account 14,593 

Sewer 131-01 200 Account 1,500 

Tree 114-02 100 Account 10,981 

Tree 114-02 200 Account 3,791 

5/5 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to adopt as Article XI of the 
Town bylaws proposed regulations for underground storage of hazardous mate- 
rials, the full text of which is available for examination at the Town Hall 
and the Public Library, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 5/5 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer to en- 
ter into written agreements for a period not to exceed one year with bank- 
ing institutions having their principal offices in the Commonwealth, to 
maintain on deposit in said institutions specified amounts of the funds of 
the Town, in return for said institutions providing banking services as 
permitted by General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53F, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Treasurer and Collector to 
enter into written agreements for a period not to ex- 
ceed one year with banking institutions having their 
principal offices in the Commonwealth, to maintain on 
deposit in said institutions specified amounts of the 
funds of the Town, in return for said institutions pro- 
viding banking services as permitted by General Laws 
Chapter 44, Section 53F. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to ac- 
quire a parcel of land adjacent to Causeway Street, belonging now or for- 
merly to the Trustees of Reservations by gift, purchase, eminent domain or 
otherwise for the purpose of realigning Causeway Street, bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: 

"Beginning at a brass bolt on the westerly line of 
Causeway Street about 400 feet southerly of Dwight Street; 
thence southeasterly, southerly and southwesterly by the 
westerly line of Causeway Street about 580 feet to a brass 
bolt; thence N 49 degrees-13' -32E, 22.53 feet to a stone 

186 



bound; thence to the left by a 300.00 foot radius curve, 
452.34 feet to the brass bolt at the point of beginning, 
containing £1,000+ or - square feet" 

and to see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate for this 
purpose, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen to ac- 
quire by eminent domain a parcel of land adjacent to 
Causeway Street, belonging to the Trustees of Reserva- 
tions for the purpose of realigning Causeway Street, 
said parcel being bounded and described as follows: 

"Beginning at a brass bolt on the westerly line of 
Causeway Street about 400 feet southerly of Dwight 
Street; thence southeasterly, southerly and southwest- 
erly by the westerly line of Causeway Street about 580 
feet to a brass bolt; thence N 49 degrees- 1 3* -32E, 
22.53 feet to a stone bound; thence to the left by a 
300.00 foot radius curve, 452.34 feet to the brass 
bolt at the point of beginning, containing 21,000+ or 
- square feet" 

and that the sum of $1.00 be appropriated for this pur- 
pose and raised on the 1987 tax levy. The vote was 
unanimous. 

5/5 

ARTICLE 24. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate on the fis- 
cal 1987 tax levy for the purpose of employing engineering services for the 
Highway Department, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article 

5/5 

ARTICLE £5. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate on 
the 1987 tax levy to be used in conjunction with and in addition to any 
funds allotted by the Commonwealth for the construction, reconstruction and 
improvement of roads under the provisions of Section 34, Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Town to apply for and re- 
ceive reimbursements in the amount of $70,000 from the 
Norfolk County Commissioners and from the Department of 
the Public Works of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
for the purpose of making improvements and repairs to 
Route 27 and for such other highway purposes as may be 
necessary and that said funds to be allocated from 
available highway funds as follows: 

Norfolk County as authorized by Section lift, * 5,600 

Chapter 14 of General Laws 
Chapter 351, Acts of 1981 FY 82 29,529.58 

Chapter 90 allocation 
Chapter 732, Acts of 1981 FY 82 allocation 34,870.42 



187 



;that the Selectmen be authorized to enter into such agreements as 
may be necessary with the Norfolk Count Commissioners and the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts for the above purposes and that the 
Treasurer be authorized to borrow with the approval of the Select- 
men in anticipation of receipt of said funds. The vote was 
unanimous. 

5/5 

ARTICLE £6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of constructing a sidewalk on easterly side of Spring 
Street (Route £7) from Curve Street southerly for a distance of 
approximately five hundred (500) feet to the new entrance to St. Edward's 
church and to install storm drainage in connection with said sidewalk, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate *14, 000 on the 1987 tax levy for 
the purpose of constructing a side walk on Spring Street 
(Route 27) from Curve Street southerly for a distance of ap- 
proximately 500 feet to the entrance to St. Edward's Church 
and to install storm drainage in connection with said side- 
walk. 

5/5 



ARTICLE £7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by 
changing Section 3.3.4 to read as follows: 

"When a District boundary line divides a lot that 
is in one ownership of record at the time such line is 
adopted, a use that is permitted on one portion of the lot 
may be extended 30 feet opposite the front lot line into the 
other portion provided the first portion includes the 
required lot width and depth. This allowance does not apply 
to Flood Plain or Watershed Protection Districts described 
in Sections 10 and 11." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(PI arm i ng Board ) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article 5/5 

ARTICLE £8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by 
changing Section 8. 3. 6. f to read as follows: 

"No portion of any entrance or exit driveway shall 
be within 150 feet of the point of intersection of the 
center lines of two or more adjoining and/or intersecting 
streets. " 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 



188 



VOTE: 

Voted to amend the Zoning By-Law by changing Section 

8. 3. 6f to read as follows: 

"No portion of any entrance or exit driveway shall 
be within 150 feet of the point of intersection of 
the center lines of two or more adjoining and/or 
i nt er sect i ng st reet s. " 

Yes 162 
No 79 

fl quorum count was called for. 300 voters were counted. 

5/5 



ARTICLE £9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by sub- 
stituting the following sections for section 5. 4. £.12: 

"5. 4.2. 1£ a) Licensed day care facility for the 
day care of six or fewer children. 

YES in residential districts 
SP in B, B-I & I-E districts 

5. 4.£. 1£ b) Licensed day care facility for the 
day care of more than six children. 

SP in all districts. " 

and by adding to the Table, Section 8.12, following "School or college," 
the following section: 

"USE Day Care facility for children. 

NUMBER OF PARKING SPACES One space for each full-time 
employee and each full-time position shared by part-time 
employees, plus one space for each 300 square feet of 
classroom space. " 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



VOTE: 

Voted unanimously to amend the zoning bylaw by substi- 
tuting the following sections for section 5.4.2.12: 

'5.4.2.12 a) Licensed day care facility for the 
day care of six or fewer children. 

YES in residential districts 
SP in B, B-I & I-E districts 

5.4.2.12 b) Licensed day care facility for the 
day care of more than six children. 

SP in all districts." 



189 



and by adding to the Table of Offstreet Parking and Loading Regula- 
tions, Section 8.12, following "School or college," as follows: 

"USE Day Care facility for children. 

NUMBER OF PARKING SPACES One space for each full -tine 
employee and each full-time position shared by part-time 
employees, plus one space for each 300 square feet of 
classroom space. " 

5/5 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by add- 
ing to Section £. l.£4, at the end of the first sentence, the words: 

", which is bounded by front, side and rear lot 
lines as defined in this Bylaw." 

By changing Section £. l.£7, first sentence, to read as follows: 

"The line dividing a lot from a street right of 
way. " 

and by adding to the end of Section £. l.£7 the following sentence : 

"The front lot line must be located so as to be 
able to provide primary access to the lot. " 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



VOTE: 

Voted to amend the zoning bylaw by adding to Section 
£.1.24, at the end of the first sentence, the words: 

", which is bounded by front, side and rear lot lines 
as defined in this Bylaw. " 

By changing Section 2.1. £7, first sentence, to read as 
follows: 

"The line dividing a lot from a street right of 
way. " 

and by adding to the end of Section 2.1.27 the following 
sentence: 

"The front lot line must be located so as to be 
able to provide primary access to the lot. " 

Yes 215 

NO 14 5/5 



190 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by add- 
ing to Section 14.10, third sentence, following the words, "special permits 
required by", the following words: 

"Section 7 - Cluster Residential Zoning," 

and by adding in the same sentence, following the words "by the provisions 
of Sections", the number "7, " 

and by inserting in Section 7.1.1, following the first sentence, a second 
sentence as follows: 

"Such permit process shall be governed by the 
provisions of Section 7 of this Bylaw." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article 

ARTICLE 3£. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by add- 
ing Section 14. 10.5. £ as follows: 

"Upon proper application pursuant to Section 13, 
and after a public hearing following the procedure required 
by Section 14.10.3, the Board of Appeals may grant a Special 
Permit to allow a sign to be erected that would otherwise 
not be permitted, if the Board concludes that a Special 
Permit is warranted by the application and the evidence 
produced at the public hearing and if the Board makes the 
following specific findings of fact: 

"a) The proposed sign will not have an adverse 
effect upon property values in the 
neighborhood. 

"b) The proposed sign is architecturally and 

aesthetically consistent with the other signs 
and structures in the area. 

"c) The proposed sign will not create any hazard 
to public safety or health in the 
neighborhood. 

"d) The proposed sign does not create a nuisance. 

"In no case shall a Special Permit be granted for 
a sign specifically prohibited in any subsection of Section 
13.3." 

and by changing Section 13.1.3 to read as follows: 

"A Sign Advisory Board shall be appointed by the 
Planning Board and shall be composed of one Planning Board 
member, one Master Plan Implementation Committee member, two 
business persons and one resident at large. " 

or act or do anything in relation thereto. 

191 



VOTE: 

Voted that the zoning bylaw be amended by adding 
section 14. 10.5. 2 as follows: 
"Upon proper application pursuant to Section 13, 
and after a public hearing following the pro- 
cedure required by Section 14.10.3, the 
Board of Appeals may grant a Special Permit 
to allow a sign to be erected that would oth- 
erwise not be permitted, if the Board con- 
cludes that a Special Permit is warranted by 
the application and the evidence produced at 
the public hearing and if the Board makes the 
following specific findings of fact: 

"a) The proposed sign will not have an adverse 
effect upon property values in the 
neighborhood. 

M b) The proposed sign is architecturally and 
aesthetically consistent with the other 
signs and structures in the area. 

"c) The proposed sign will not create any haz- 
ard to public safety or health in the 
neighborhood. 

"d) The proposed sign does not create a nui- 
sance. 

"In no case shall a Special Permit be granted 
for a sign specifically prohibited in any 
subsection of Section 13.3." 

and by changing section 13.1.3 to read as 
follows: 

"ft Sign Advisory Board shall be appointed by 
the Planning Board and shall be composed of 
one Planning Board member, one Master Plan 
Implementation Committee member, two busi- 
ness persons and one resident at large. " 

Yes 231 

No 4 5/5 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:30. It is to reconvene May 6, 1986 at 7:30 
P.M. 



192 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

The meeting was called to order at 7:50 P.M. at the Amos Clark 
Kingsbury High School after ascertaining that a quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by add- 
ing to Section 6.2.1, after the words "Except for," the following words: 

"mult i family residential developments," 

and by adding to Section 14.13.1 the following paragraph: 

"For multifamily site plans, the size, number and 
placement of structures on the site shall be appropriate to 
the site and compatible with its surroundings." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



VOTE: 

Voted unanimously to amend the zoning bylaw by adding to 
Section 6.2.1, after the words, "Except for," 

"Multifamily residential developments," 

and by adding to Section 14.13.1 a paragraph as follows: 

"For multifamily site plans on which more than one principal 
structure is proposed, the size, number and placement of 
structures on the site shall be appropriate to the site and 
compatible with its surroundings." 

5/6 

ARTICLE 34. To see what vote the Town will take on the following petition: 

"The By Laws of the Town of Medfield shall be amended by 
adding to Article I (Town Meetings) Section 4 the following 
language: 

'Votes taken at any Annual or Special Town Meeting of 
the Town of Medfield may be taken by voice, show of 
hands or by standing vote, at the discretion of the 
Moderator. No vote by Australian ballot, secret ballot 
or any other form of written vote shall be permitted 
unless a motion shall have been made requesting such 
Australian ballot, secret ballot or written vote at the 
Town Meeting at which it is proposed that such ballot 
or vote occur, which motion shall specify the article 
or articles for which an Australian Ballot, secret 
ballot or written vote is proposed. It shall be 
sufficient if said motion carries by a simple 
majority. ' " 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article 5/6 

193 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of conducting a Hazardous Household Waste Collection 
Day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $2,000 for the purpose of conducting a Hazardous 
Household Waste Collection Day. 5/6 

ARTICLE 3G. To see if the Town will vote to amend the official Zoning Map 
of the Town of Medfield by changing from Industrial Intensive district to 
Business Industrial district the following parcel of land in Medfield, Not — 
folk County, Massachusetts, being more particularly described as follows: 

The land with the buildings thereon, situated on North Meadows Road (also 
known as Route £7) in Medfield, Norfolk County, Massachusetts being shown 
as Lots C-£ and C-3 on a plan entitled "Plan of Lots in Medfield, Massachu- 
setts, Prepared for Owens Trust", dated August 31, 197S as revised and re- 
corded with Norfolk Deeds as Plan No. 967 of 1978 in Plan Book £71, said 
Lots being more particularly described according to said plan, as follows: 

Lot C-£ NORTHWESTERLY by Lot C-l £50.13 feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of 

B. S. F. Realty Trust, by 

three courses measuring 

£4.96 feet, 193. 0£ feet 

and 3. 99 feet 

respect ively ; 
SOUTHEASTERLY by Lot C-3, 149.79 feet; 
SOUTHWESTERLY by North Meadows Road, 

£02.00 feet. 

Containing 40, 129 square feet of land. 

Lot_[>3 NORTHWESTERLY by Lot C-£, 149.79 feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY by Land now or formerly of 

G.S.L. Realty Trust, 78.11 

feet ; 
SOUTHEASTERLY by land now for formerly 

of Richard K. Donahue and 

land now or formerly of 

Edward J. Stefanick et ux, 

124. 80 feet; 

and 
SOUTHWESTERLY by North Meadows Road, 

71.38 feet. 

Containing 10,004 square feet of land. 
VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article 5/6 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Medfield Zoning Map 
by extending the RU-Resident ial Urban District to include all of lots 115, 
116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 144, 145 and 146 on Assessors Map 
4£ or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



194 



VOTE: 

Voted that the Medfield zoning map be amended by ex- 
tending the RU-Residential Urban District to include all of lots 
115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 144, 145 and 146 on 
Assessors Map 42. 

Yes 239 

NO 113 5/6 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to authorise the Board of 
Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the re- 
duction of the fiscal 1987 Tax rate or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Board of Assessors to 
use the sum of $398,269. for the purpose of reduc- 
ing the Fiscal 1987 Tax rate. 

5/6 

Reconsideration of Article 17 failed. 

The meeting was dissolved at 10:05 P.M. 



B Nancy J. Preston 

Town Clerk 

A true copy attest 

ATTORNEY GENERAL'S APPROVAL August 4, 1986 

Boston, Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendments to the zoning by-laws 
adopted under articles £8, £9, 30, 3£, 33 and 37 of 
the warrant for the Medfield Annual Town Meeting 
held April £8, and May 5 and 6, 1986 are hereby ap- 
proved. 

The within zoning map pertaining to Article 37 of 
the warrant for the Medfield Annual Town Meeting 
held April £8, and May 5 and 6, 1986 is hereby ap- 
proved. 

The foregoing amendment to the general by-laws un- 
der Article 8 is hereby approved. 

The amendment to the general by-laws under Article 
IS of the warrant for the Medfield Annual Town 
Meeting held April £8, 1986 is hereby disapproved. 
This by-law is disapproved since it was disapproved 
by the Board of Five Prevention Regulations. 

Francis X. Bel lot ti 



195 



Norfolk, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to 
vote at Memorial School, Adams Street on TUESDAY, THE SIXTEENTH DAY OF SEP- 
TEMBER, 1986 from 6 A.M. to 8 P.M. for the following purpose: 



To cast their votes in the State Primary for the 
litical parties for the following offices: 



candidates of po- 



GOVERNOR 

LT. GOVERNOR 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

AUDITOR 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 

COURT 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY 
SHERIFF 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 
COUNTY TREASURER 



For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
Fourth Congressional District 
Second Counc i 1 1 or D i st r i ct 
Norfolk, Bristol, Middlesex 
Senatorial District 

Eighth Representative District 
Norfolk District 
Norfolk County 
Norfolk County 
Norfolk County 



Hereof fail not and make return of this 
thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 



warrant with your doings 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at lest before the time of holding said meeting. 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with you doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 



196 



Given under our hands this 12TH day of August 1986. 

b Robert J. Lark in, Chairman 
s William F. Nourse, Clerk 
s Ann B. Thompson 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



Norfolk, SS. 

PURSUANT TO THE WITHIN WARRANT, I have notified and warned the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Medfield by posting up attested copies of the same at 
five public places fourteen days before the date of the meetings, as within 
directed. 

s George W. Kingsbury, Constable 
August 13, 198S 



197 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
STATE PRIMARY 
SEPTEMBER 16, 1986 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with 
the reading of the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers 
present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in working order, 
specimen ballots posted, voting list was displayed and instruction to the 
voters were posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts: 

Anna Murphy, Warden 



PRECINCT 1. Mary MairEtienne 
Mabel le Maguire 



PRECINCT 



Be ver 1 y Hall owe 1 1 
Nancy Munroe 



PRECINCT 3. Anna Murphy 

Barbara Connors 



Marion Bosselman 
Adelaid Cochrane 

Ernrny Mitchell 
Edna H ink ley 

Margaret O'Brien 
Leonard Anes 



PRECINCT 4. 



Katherine Buchanan 
Eleanor Anes 



Jack Fernandes 
Dorothy Sumner 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1,754. There were £4 Republican absentee ballots and 10 
Democratic absentee ballots. Total Registered Voters numbered 5888. 30* of 
voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as fol- 
1 ows : 



DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 

GOVERNOR, VOTE FOR ONE 

Michael S. Dukakis 
Blanks 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, VOTE FOR ONE 
Gerard D' Amico 
Evelyn F. Murphy 
Blanks 



ATTORNEY GENERAL, VOTE FOR ONE 
James M. Shannon 
JoAnn Shot we 11 
Blanks 



1 



PRECINCT 
4 TOTAL 



118 169 182 144 603 
£9 37 36 £4 1£6 



47 

9£ 

8 



64 78 46 £35 

138 140 ISO 490 

4 £ 1£ 



88 


1£5 


149 


89 


451 


47 


63 


67 


71 


£48 


IS 


18 


£ 


8 


40 



739 



739 



739 



198 



DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 



PRECINCT 
3 4 TOTAL 



SECRETARY, VOTE FOR ONE 

Michael Joseph Connolly 
Blanks 



TREASURER, VOTE FOR ONE 

Robert Q. Crane 
Blanks 



AUDITOR, VOTE FOR ONE 

A. Joseph DeNucci 

Hennigan 

Yancey 

Blanks 



CONGRESSMAN, VOTE FOR ONE 
Frank 
Rosa 
Blanks 



COUNCILLOR, VOTE FOR ONE 
Iannella 
Blanks 



108 158 
39 48 



97 141 
50 65 



176 125 567 
42 43 172 



148 105 491 
70 63 172 



81 


89 


108 


74 


352 


42 


72 


61 


66 


241 


12 


25 


27 


15 


79 


12 


20 


22 


13 


168 



129 178 

16 20 

2 8 



108 146 
39 60 



197 148 652 

15 15 66 

6 5 21 



158 109 521 
60 59 218 



739 



739 



739 



739 



739 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, VOTE FOR ONE 

Blanks 147 206 



218 168 739 739 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

VOTE FOR ONE 
Gardner 
Simmons 
Blanks 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY, VOTE FOR ONE 
Delahunt 
Blanks 



SHERIFF, VOTE FOR ONE 
Marshall 
Blanks 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER, VOTE FOR ONE 
Ah earn 
Blanks 



72 119 
64 69 
11 18 



108 157 
39 49 



108 150 
39 56 



103 150 
44 56 



103 113 407 
99 46 278 
16 9 54 



161 119 545 
57 49 194 



152 112 522 
66 56 217 



156 113 522 
66 56 217 



739 



739 



739 



739 



199 



DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 



TREASURER, VOTE FOR ONE 
Raymond i 
Blanks 



REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 

GOVERNOR, VOTE FOR ONE 
Hyatt 
Switzler 
Kariot is 
Blanks 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, VOTE FOR ONE 
Nikitas 
Blanks 



ATTORNEY GENERAL, VOTE FOR ONE 
Harrington 
Blanks 



SECRETARY, VOTE FOR ONE 
Cochran 
Blanks 



TREASURER, VOTE FOR ONE 
Hampers 
Blanks 



AUDITOR, VOTE FOR ONE 
Nat si os 
Robinson 
Blanks 



CONGRESSMAN, VOTE FOR ONE 
Blanks 



COUNCILLOR, VOTE FOR ONE 
Blanks 



PRECINCT 



4 TOTAL 



104 149 153 108 514 



43 



57 6< 



739 



1 2 



PRECINCT 
3 4 TOTAL 



50 58 61 54 £23 

45 75 77 73 270 

23 30 30 12 95 

63 130 122 122 437 



117 168 175 172 632 
64 125 115 89 393 



131 208 217 191 747 
50 85 72 70 278 



119 186 211 183 699 
62 107 79 78 326 



128 194 216 191 729 
53 99 74 70 296 



157 230 262 215 864 
14 41 24 31 110 
10 22 4 15 51 



181 293 290 261 1025 



181 293 290 261 1025 



1025 



1025 



102J 



1025 



1025 



1025 



1025 



1025 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, VOTE FOR ONE 
Locke 
Blanks 



141 209 235 211 796 
40 84 55 5 



229 1025 



200 



REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

VOTE FOR ONE 
Dahl 
Nourse 
Simonett i 
Willis 
Blanks 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY, VOTE FOR ONE 
Blanks 



SHERIFF, VOTE FOR ONE 
Blanks 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER, VOTE FOR ONE 
Blanks 



TREASURER, VOTE FOR ONE 
Blanks 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 







PRECINCT 


1 


£ 


3 


4 TOTAL 


7 


12 


17 


14 50 


68 


100 


78 


103 349 


59 


115 


98 


94 366 


44 


61 


94 


49 £48 


»3 


5 


3 


1 1£ 



181 £93 £90 £61 10£5 



181 £93 £90 £61 10£5 



181 £93 £90 £61 10£5 



181 £93 £90 £61 10£5 



10£J 



10£ e v 



10£5 



10£5 



10£5 



Ballot Counters: Marge Eppich, Mabel le Maguire, Mary MairEt ienne, Adelaide 
Cochrane, Anna Murphy, Katherine Buchanan, Virginia Murley, Emmy Mitchell, 
Margaret O'Brien, Leonard Anes, Eleanor Anes, Dorothy Sumner, John 
Fernandes, Nancy Franke, Patricia Rioux, Jessie Port man, Georgia Karafotias, 
Edna Hinkley, Irene 0' Toole, James Preston, Judy Plank, David Armstrong, 
Barbara Armstrong, Scott Basset t, Marion Bosselrnan, and Priscilla Anderson. 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting lists and 
tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as pre- 
scribed by law. 



<s Nancy J. Preston 
A true copy attest: 



201 



STATE ELECTIONS 



Norfolk, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of said town who Are qualified to vote in elections to 
vote at Memorial School, Adams Street on TUESDAY THE FOURTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 
1986 from £ A.M. to 8 P.M. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of po- 
litical parties for the following offices: 



GOVERNOR 

LT. GOVERNOR 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

AUDITOR 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 

COURT 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY 
SHERIFF 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 
COUNTY TREASURER 



For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
For the Commonwealth 
Fourth Congressional District 
Second Counc i 1 1 or D i st r i ct 
Norfolk, Bristol, Middlesex 
Senatorial District 

Eighth Representative District 
Norfolk District 
Norfolk County 
Norfolk County 
Norfolk County 



QUESTION 1 



PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 



Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summa- 
rized below, which was approved by the General Court in joint sessions of 
the House of Representatives and the Senate on June £7, 1984 by a vote of 
ISO - 67, and on April 30, 1986 by a vote of 1£3 - 69? 



YES 



NO 



SUMMARY 



The proposed constitutional amendment would allow the legislature to pro- 
hibit or regulate abortions to the extent permitted by the United States 
Constitution. It would also provide that the state constitution does not 
require public or private funding of abortions, or the provision of services 
of facilities for performing abortions, beyond what is required by the 
United States Constitution. The provisions of this amendment would not ap- 
ply to abortions required to prevent the death of the mother. 

202 



QUESTION £ PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTIO N 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summa- 
rized below, which was approved by the General Court in Joint sessions of 
the House of Representatives and the Senate on December IS, 1984 by a vote 
of 108 - 79, and on April 16, 1986 by a vote of 107 - 87? 

YES NO 

SUMMARY 



The proposed constitutional amendment would allow the expenditure of public 
funds for private schools and private school students. 

It would remove primary and secondary schools from the list of non-public 
institutions barred from receiving public aid and would allow public money, 
property, or loans of credit to be used for founding, maintaining, or aiding 
those schools. The proposed amendment would also allow public financial 
aid, materials, or services to be provided to a non-public school student 
requesting such aid, but only if that school does not discriminate in its 
entrance requirements on the basis of race, color, national origin, reli- 
gious belief, sex, or physical handicap. The state legislature would have 
the power to impose limits on aid, materials, or services provided to stu- 
dents. 



QUES TION 3 LAw" PRO POSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the House 
of Representatives on May 6, 1986, by a vote of 49 - 93, and on which no 
vote was taken by the Senate before May 7, 1986? 

YES NO 

SUMMARY 



The proposed law would reduce and then repeal the 7 l/£"/. surtax on Massachu- 
setts state income taxes and would limit state tax revenue growth to the 
level of growth in total wages and salaries of the citizens of the state. 

It would set the rate of the surtax on Massachusetts state income taxes at 
3 3/4% for tax years beginning during 1986, and it would repeal the surtax 
for tax years beginning on or after January 1, 1987. 

The allowable state tax revenues for any fiscal year are limited to the al- 
lowable state tax revenues for the prior fiscal year as increased by the av- 
erage rate of growth of Massachusetts wages and salaries for the three im- 
mediately preceding calendar years. For purposes of calculating the 
proposed limit for fiscal year 1987, allowable state tax revenues for fiscal 
1986 are the next tax revenues for that fiscal year, but excluding revenues 
derived from the surtax on state personal income tax. Further, if in any 
fiscal year the calculation of the limit results in allowable state tax rev- 
enues less than the amount of allowable state tax revenues for the prior 
year, the allowable state tax revenues for that fiscal year shall be equal 
to the allowable state tax revenues for the prior year. The revenues lim- 
ited by this law would not include non-tax revenues such as federal reim- 
bursements, tuitions, fees and earnings on investments. 



203 



The amount of allowable state tax revenues for any fiscal year would have to 
be reduced if a new state law were enacted allowing local governments to im- 
pose new or increased taxes or excises. The reduction would be equal to the 
amount of revenue derived from the new tax or increase. The reduction in 
state tax revenues would first take effect in the fiscal year following the 
enactment of the new law authorizing new local taxes or increases. If state 
tax revenues exceed the limit imposed by the proposed law, as determined by 
the State Auditor, a tax credit would have to be granted equal to the total 
amount of excess tax revenue. The credit would be applied to the then cur- 
rent personal income tax liability of all taxpayers in proportion to their 
personal income tax liability in the preceding year. The provisions of the 
Act could be enforced in court by a group of taxpayers. 

QUESTION 4 LAw" PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was approved by the House of 
Representatives on May 5, 1986, by a vote of 145 - 0, and on which no vote 
was taken by the Senate before May 7, 1986? 

YES NO 

SUMMARY 



The proposed law would require the state Department of Environmental Duality 
Engineering (DEQE) to search for sites in the Commonwealth where oil or haz- 
ardous materials have been disposed of and to take all steps necessary to 
clean up those sites within specified time limits. Provisions are made for 
informing the public about sites in their communities. Beginning on January 
15, 1987, DEQE would be required to publish lists every three months of all 
sites where it has confirmed that uncontrolled oil or hazardous materials 
have been disposed of and locations to be investigated as possible disposal 
sites. The lists would describe what actions have been taken at each site 
or location. DEQE would be required to list, to the extent that it has 
identified, at least 400 possible disposal sites by January 1£5, 1987, 600 
additional locations by January 15, 1988, and 1,000 additional locations in 
each subsequent year. 

Within one year after a location is listed as a possible disposal site DEQE 
would be required to determine if further investigation is warranted. If 
so, within two years after the listing, DEQE must confirm whether the loca- 
tion is a disposal site, and whether it poses an imminent or substantial 
hazard to health, safety, public welfare or the environment. 

For sites found to pose a substantial hazard, DEQE would be required, within 
the next two years, to ensure that those hazards are eliminated and to de- 
velop a plan to eliminate permanently future risks from those sites. Im- 
minent hazards would have to be eliminated immediately. For sites found not 
to pose any substantial hazards DEQE must, within seven years after the 
listing, ensure that the full extent of contamination is evaluated and that 
a plan to eliminate permanently future risks is developed. 

The proposed law would require DEQE to provide public notice and encourage 
public participation. Within 30 days after completing a site investigation, 
DEQE would have to inform the public through local newspapers of the results 
of that investigation and of the rights of local citizens under the state 
law. If ten citizens of a town potentially affected by a site submit a re- 
quest, DEQE would be required to develop a plan for involving the public in 
its clean-up decisions and present that plan at a public meeting. The chief 
municipal officer of a city or town in which a disposal site is located 

204 



could appoint individual (s) to inspect the site on behalf of the community. 

Massachusetts residents could bring lawsuits to enforce the provisions of 
the proposed law or to lessen a hazard related to oil or hazardous materi- 
als. If such a lawsuit is brought, a court could award costs, including 
reasonable fees for attorneys and expert witnesses. 



QUESTION 5 REFERENDUM ON AN EXISTING LQUJ 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was approved by the House of 
Representatives on October 17, 1985, by a vote of 77 - 6£, and which was ap- 
proved by the Senate on October 17, 1985? 

YES NO 

SUMMARY 



The law requires all drivers and passengers to wear properly adjusted and 
fastened seat belts while traveling in motor vehicles on public ways. It 
does not apply to: children under five years old who are required by another 
law to wear safety belts or be restrained in safety car seats; passengers in 
vehicles where all safety belts are being used by others; passengers in 
buses; persons riding in vehicles built before July 1, 1966, or in which 
safety belts were not installed as original equipment; or persons who are 
certified by a physician to be physically unable to use safety belts. The 
law also does not apply to police officers, rural mail carriers, or drivers 
or passengers of other vehicles that stop frequently and travel at speeds 
not exceeding 15 miles per hour between stops. Drivers or passengers six- 
teen years or older who do not wear safety belts are subject to a $15.00 
fine. The driver of a vehicle is also subject to a $15.00 fine for each 
passenger under sixteen who does not wear a safety belt. This law, however, 
can be enforced only if the driver is stopped for a violation of another mo- 
tor vehicle law. Safety belt violations will not result in surcharges or\ 
motor vehicle insurance premiums. The law also requires that when the Com- 
missioner of Insurances sets motor vehicle insurance rates, the rates must 
reflect any savings attributable to increased use of safety belts. The law 
also requires that all motor vehicles manufactured after September 1, 1989, 
that are sold or registered in Massachusetts be equipped with crash protec- 
tion devices, as specified by federal regulations. Any manufacturer who 
sells or delivers vehicles that are not equipped with such safety devices 
will be subject to a fine of not more than $100 for each sale or delivery. 
This law is not intended to eliminate the federal requirements for passive 
crash protection devices in motor vehicles. 

The law also provides that a non-binding question, unlike this binding ref- 
erendum, shall be placed on the 1986 general election ballot asking whether 
the voters approve of the law. 



Q UE STION 6 LAW PR OPOSED BY INIT IATIV E PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the House 
of Representatives on May 6, 1986, by a vote of 56 - 93, and on which no 
vote was taken by the Senate before May 7, 1986? 

YES NO 



205 



SUMMARY 



The proposed law would provide a system of voter registration by mail ap- 
plicable to all qualified voters and would eliminate statutory provisions 
permitting certain persons to vote only for presidential electors. 

Under this proposed law, the State Secretary would be required to prepare 
blank forms for affidavits of registration. The Secretary and local boards 
of registrars would be required to make such forms available to any person 
eligible to in whatever quantity the person requests and to transmit such 
forms, upon written request, to any person claiming to be qualified to vote. 
Registrars would also be required to make these forms available at all post 
offices and at other places within their municipalities. The secretary 
would be required to establish a reasonable fee for providing more than 50 
forms and to prepare instructions to accompany the forms. 

A person seeking to register to vote would be required to complete the af- 
fidavit of registration and sign it under oath in the presence of a witness 
who is at least eighteen years old. The witness would be required to cer- 
tify that the affidavit was signed in his presence and to date the affida- 
vit. 

fi completed affidavit of registration could be either delivered or mailed to 
the appropriate registrar's office. If, from the facts set forth in the af- 
fidavit, it appears that the person is qualified to vote, the registrars 
would be required to add the person's name to the list of registered voters 
and to so notify the person by first-class, non-forwardable mail, unless the 
person's name already appears on the local list of residents at the same ad- 
dress. The cost of mailing such notices would be assumed by he Common- 
wealth, subject to appropriation. If in any year the General Court fails to 
appropriate funds for that purpose, such notices would not have to be sent. 
If such a notice is returned undelivered, the city or town clerk would be 
required to instruct election officials to challenge the person's right to 
vote at the next election in which he attempts to vote. 

The proposed law would also impose criminal penalties of imprisonment for up 
to two years or a fine up to $2,000 for knowingly or willfully making a 
false affidavit, taking a false oath, or signing a false certificate 
relative to the qualifications or registration of any person to vote. 



QUESTION 7 THIS QUESTION IS NONBINDING 

Shall the Commonwealth of Massachusetts urge the United States Congress to 
enact a national health program which: provides high quality comprehensive 
personal health care including preventive, curative and occupational health 
services; is universal in coverage, community controlled, rationally orga- 
nized, equitable financed, with no out- of- pocket charges, is sensitive to 
the particular health needs of all, and is efficient in containing its cost; 
and whose yearly expenditure does not exceed the proportion of the Gross Na- 
tional Product spent on health care in the immediately preceding fiscal 
year? 

YES NO 



206 



QUESTION 8 THIS QUESTION IS NONBINDING 



Shall the Commonwealth of Massachusetts urge the President of the United 
States and the United States Congress to enact a national acid rain control 
program which would require a fifty percent reduction in total national sul- 
fur dioxide emissions by the year nineteen hundred and ninety- five and which 
would allocate the required reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions, and the 
costs of achieving those reductions, equitably among the states? 

YES NO 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at 
the time and place of said meeting. 

find you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 14th day of October 1986. 

s Robert J. Lark in, Chairman 
s William F. Nourse, Clerk 
s Ann B. Thompson 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



207 



Norfolk, SS. 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and 
for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not 
less than five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days be- 
fore the time of holding the meeting. 

s George W. Kingsbury, Constable 

ft TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

s Nancy J. Preston, Town Clerk 



208 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1986 



209 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORT 
1985, 1986, 1987 



1985 



Class 




Parcel Count 


1) Residential 




3095 


2) Open Space 




288 


3) Commercial 




117 


4) Industrial 




41 


5) Personal 




123 


Total Real & Pers 


;onal 


3664 


Tax Levy 






Overlay 




, 


Tax Rate per thousand all 


classes 


1986 






Class 






1) Residential 




3138 


2) Open Space 




242 


3) Commercial 




114 


4) Industrial 




43 


5) Personal 




135 



Total Real & Personal 

Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 

1987 



3672 



Class 

1) Residential 

2) Open Space 

3) Commercial 

4) Industrial 

5) Personal 

Total Real & Personal 

Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 



3184 

239 

104 

41 

137 

3705 



Valuation 

$271,590,550.00 

5,617,200.00 

11,376,100.00 

9,392,950.00 

4,920,550.00 

$302,897,350.00 

6,512,293.07 

73,194.07 

21.50 



$436,041,700.00 

6,011,550.00 

18,955,650.00 

14,255,650.00 

5,092,500.00 

$480,357,350.00 

7,013,217.30 

119,894.31 

14.60 



$445,546,900.00 

6,495,250.00 

19,278,150.00 

15,672,100.00 

5,587,951.00 

$492,580,351.00 

7,314,818.21 

66,307.21 

14.85 



210 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



REAL ESTATE TAXES RECEIVABLE 



Personal Property 






Real Estate 


Taxes 




Levy of 








Levy of 








1986 


$ 


725.62 




1978 




$ 


1,223.29 


1985 




751.41 




1979 






2,548.13 


1984 




640.82 




1980 






3,441.13 


1983 




486.36 




1981 






2,757.12 


1982 




495.05 




1982 






7,361.90 


1981 




309.84 




1983 






11,569.20 


1980 




36.54 




1984 
1985 






16,653.90 
34,871.73 


TOTAL BALANCE 


$3, 


445.64 




1986 






164,899.11 










TOTAL BALANCE 


$ 


245,325.51 


Motor Vehicle 


Excise 


! Tax 




Apportioned 


Sewe 


r Betterments 


Levy of 








Levy of 








1979 




$ 


761.48 


1984 




$ 


30.43 


1980 




1 


,198.69 


1985 




i 


174.99 


1981 




1 


,061.57 


1986 






804.13 


1982 




2 


,953.73 










1983 




2 


,008.84 


TOTAL BALANCE 


$1 


,009.55 


1984 




2 


,249.84 










1985 




6 


,595.95 










1986 




49 


,998.83 


Apportioned 


Water Betterments 










Levy of 








TOTAL BALANCE 




$ 66 


,828.93 


1978 
1979 




$ 


395.41 
182.74 


Sewer Liens Added to 


Taxes 




1986 






56. 20 


Levy of 
















1984 




$ 


129.88 


TOTAL BALANCE 


$ 


634.85 


1985 
1986 






328.90 
475.34 


Water Liens 
Levy of 


Added to Taxes 


TOTAL BALANCE 




$ 


934.12 


1984 
1985 
1986 




$ 
1 


234.20 

335.00 

,655.00 










TOTAL BALANCE 


$2 


,224.20 



Water Rates Receivable $73,060.84 



Waste Disposal 

1985 
1986 

TOTAL BALANCE 



15.00 
210.00 



$ 225.00 



Respectfully submitted, 
Nancy J. ?h.2A£oyi 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



211 



TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Receipts Fiscal 1986 - Including Investments $16,656,086.84 
Disbursements Fiscal 1986 - Including Investments $16,555,867.83 

Cash in Banks June 30, 1986 - Including Savings/ 

Money Market Accounts $ 2,683,599.26 

STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 

Stabilization Fund $ 70,952.49 

Pooled Investment Fund 177,572.58 

Investments June 30, 1986 $ 248,525.07 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June 30, 1986 $ 2,932,124.33 

STATEMENT OF INTEREST RECEIVED ON SAVINGS /INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $ 171,835.77 

Stabilization Fund 15,801.85 

Federal Revenue Sharing Fund 11,212.44 

Pooled Investment Fund 8,378.14 

Total Interest received Fiscal 1986 $ 207,228.20 

STATEMENT OF FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING FUND 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June 30, 1985 $ 128,350.71 

Adjustment for interest received in Fiscal Year/1983 186.86 

$ 128,537.57 
Distribution received Fiscal 1986 104,649.00 

Interest received Fiscal 1986 11,025.58 

Total Revenue Sharing Fund Fiscal 1986 """ '" $ 244,212.15 

Transferred to General Fund - Article 13, 

Voted Annual Town Meeting, April 1985 (125,000.00 ) 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June 30, 1986 $ 119,212.15 

The foregoing report is a record of the cash, investments and interest 
earned for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1986. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edwasid F. BaAA&tt, JVi. 
TOWN TREASURER 



212 



June 30, 1986 

OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 
Net Funded or Fixed Debt $ 2,545,000.00 

Outside Debt Limit : 

Elm Street (Wheelock) School $ 255,000.00 

Sewers - Longmeadow 100,000.00 

Street Sewers & Construction 900,000.00 

Mount Nebo Water Tower 500,000.00 1,755,000.00 

Inside Debt Limit: 

Noon Hill Land Acquisition 80,000.00 
Police Station Construction 50,000.00 
Sewers-Charles River Interceptor 60,000.00 

Refuse Transfer Station 600,000.00 790,000.00 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Balance June 30, 1986 $ 974,826.88 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 

Library: 

Granville F. Dailey Trust $ 75,581.86 

Library Trust Funds 11,653.50 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 174,874.30 

Stabilization Fund 70,952.49 

Conservation Fund 16,124.71 

Retirement Fund 555,564.74 
Special Unemployment Compensation 

Fund 50,803.53 $ 955,555.13 

Funds in Custody of Selectmen: 

Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 10,125.74 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 6,304.38 

Tri-Centennial Trust 923.17 17,353.29 

Funds in Custody of School: 

Essay Fund Account 1,918.46 



213 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1986 



$ 725.62 
2,279.89 



154,903.47 
72,271.80 
(5,306.99) 



GENERAL FUND 

Cash 

Taxes : 

Personal Property 
Current Year 
Prior Years 

Real Estate 
Current Year 
Prior Years 
Prepaid Taxes 

Agricultural-Hort. Tax 
Forestry Tax 
Recreation Tax 



Prov. for Abatements & Exemptions: 
Current Year 
Prior Years 

Reserve for Uncollected Taxes 

Tax Liens Receivable 

Reserve for Uncollected Tax Liens 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 



Current Year 
Prior Years 



48,659.57 
15,904.44 



Reserve Uncoil. Motor Vehicle Excise 

Ambulance Charges Receivable 
Reserve Uncoil. Ambulance Charges 

Unapportioned Sewer Betterment 

App. Sewer Betterment Paid in Advance 

Committed Int. App. Sewer Bett. Pd. Advance 

App. Sewer Betterment Add. to Taxes 
Current Year 920.31 

Prior Years (18.67 ) 

Committed Interest Sewer 

App. Water Betterment Add. Taxes 

Current Year 177.69 

Prior Years 875.71 

Committed Interest Water 

Reserve for Uncoil. Special Betterments 



Debit 



$2,392,523.59 



Credit 



3,005.51 



221,868.28 




10.94 




45.78 




1,367.31 






$ 55,609.36 




125,062.50 




171,838.54 


60,363.71 






60,363.71 



64,564.01 



32,511.95 



14,426.04 

515.90 

18.24 



901.64 
875.01 

1,053.40 
978.07 



64,564.01 



32,511.95 



18,768.30 



214 



GENERAL FUND 



Debit 



Credit 



Water Rates Receivable 
Water Services Receivable 



$ 73,060.84 
4,448.93 



Water Liens Added to Taxes: 

Current Year $ 252.70 

Prior Years ( 334.41 ) 

Reserve for Uncollected Water Receipts 

Sewer Rates Receivable 

Septic Waste Charge Receivable 

Sewer Liens Added to Taxes 

Current Year 2,325.60 

Prior Years 1,149.85 

Reserve for Uncollected Sewer Receipts 

State Sewer Grants Receivable 
State Highway Grants Receivable 
State & Federal Grants Unbilled 



(81.71) 



23,453.03 
36,995.92 



3,475.45 



95,173.00 
300,243.00 



$ 77,428.06 



63,924.40 



379,523.00 



Bonds Authorized 

Bonds Authorized and Unissued 



600,000.00 



600,000.00 



Federal Income Tax Withholding Payable 
Health Insurance Withholding Payable 
Life Insurance Withholding Payable 

Tailings 

Guarantee Deposits 
Treasurer's Tax Title 
Collector's Tax Title 



26.25 



24,590.48 
35.63 

7,509.80 
4,041.69 
6,443.65 
1,492.95 



Reserved Fund Balances : 
Premium on Loans 
Abatement /Exemption Surplus 
Over (Under) Assessments 
Court Judgments 
Encumbrances 
Unreserved Fund Balance 

TOTALS - GENERAL FUND 



37,500.00 



$3,969,864.09 



225.00 

14,053.05 

2,683.00 

1,433,550.37 
825,644.64 

$3,969,864.09 



215 



SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 



Debit 



Credit 



Cash 

Federal Grants: 

Federal Revenue Sharing Entitlements 

Federal Ambulance Fund 

N.C.S. Educ. Assistance 

Titles, Occ Ed. Etc. 

Chapter II ECIA & Comp. B.S. #380 

State Grants: 

Public Works, Special Highway 

Right to Know 

Reimb. Water Poll. Chemicals 

Census Grant 

Energy Grant 

Mini Bus Grant 

School Imp. & Prof. Dev. Grant 

Arts Lottery 

Private Grants: 

Revolving Funds: 
Athletic 
Adult Education 
College Nite 
Recreation 
School Lunch & Dairy 
Police Detail 
Custodian Detail 
Dog 
Library 



$ 386,076.93 



$119,212.15 

1,000.00 

11,136.00 

17,667.45 

1,559.05 



149,368.95 
1,094.00 
4,300.00 
1,129.55 
3,033.04 
4,901.76 
3,942.46 
1,784.07 

9,239.92 



3,486.53 

8,434.52 

5.19 

788.12 

8,040.16 

( 317.00) 

8,310.76 

279.25 

120.00 



Sale of Cemetery Lots 



TOTALS - SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 



$ 386,076.93 



27, 561,00 
$386,076.93 



TRUST FUNDS 



Cash 
Investments 

Fund Balances 

In Custody of Treasurer: 

Retirement 

Stabilization 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Conservation 

Library Trusts 

Granville Dailey Library 

Special Unemployment Insurance 

Group Health Insurance 



402,223.45 
604,326.20 



$555,564.78 
70,952.49 
174,874.30 
16,124.71 
11,653.50 
75,508.67 
50,803.53 
27,678.79 



216 



Debit 



Expendable Trusts: 

Perpetual Care Income 
Granville Dailey Income 
Robert Luke 

In Custody of Selectmen: 
Moses Ellis Post G.A.R. 
Antiquities 
Tricentennial 



Credit 

847.25 

3,251.57 

2.06 



10,141.99 

6,304.38 

923.17 



In Custody of School Committee 
Essay Fund 

TOTALS - TRUST FUND 

TOTAL ALL FUNDS 



1,918.46 



$1,006,549.65 $1,006,549.65 
$5,362,490.67 $5,362,490.67 



217 



WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Total Services 
Added Services 
Thousand gallons used 
Thousand gallons sold 

Water Revenue Received 

Water Rates 
Water Services 

Expenses 
Debt Services 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

Total Units 
Added Units 
Sewer Use Charge 
Sewer Installation 
Sewer Installer's Fee 
Septic Waste Disposal Fee 

Expenses 



1985 


1986 


1987 


Actual 


Actual 


Estimated 


2,950 


3,018 


3,050 


40 


68 


32 


367,758 


412,422 


425,000 


276,869 


234,412 


325,000 


240,780. 


234,412. 


325,000 


3,264. 


2,515. 


3,000 


227,639. 


237,815. 


249,630 


800,000. 


800,000. 


800,000 


818 


870 


900 


52 


52 


30 


$131,724. 


$211,445. 


$211,445 


1,420. 


660. 


700 


475. 


250. 


300 


25,282. 


25,406. 


26,000 


$178,199. 


$208,916. 


$212,693 



218 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Baumann, E. Lot $ 1,200, 

Priestly - Sarno Lot 2,000, 

Abrams, J. Lot 150, 

Chudzik, T. Lot 400, 

Byrnes, E. Lot 800, 

Ness, R. Lot 251, 

Burr, H. Lot 200, 

Alasso, A. Lot 400, 

Ryan, J. Lot 600, 

Ours, F. Lot 200, 

DeSorgher, L. Lot 300, 

Morrissey, H. Lot 800, 

Jackson, W. Lot 800. 

Brewer, C. Lot 1,200, 

Germaine, J. Lot 200, 

Carpenter Lot 150. 

LaFrance, B. Lot 750. 

Becker, R. Lot 450. 

Contieri, A. Lot 600. 

Bernardo, M. Lot 1,200. 

Walsh, W. Lot . 1,200. 

D' Antonio, J. Lot 800. 

Clarkin, L. Lot 600. 

Strittmatter, L. Lot 300. 

Sullivan, E. Lot 600. 

Knowles, M. Lot 200. 

Smith, E. Lot 400. 

Sanders, D. Lot 350. 

Smith, G. Lot 200. 

Ross, A. Lot 400. 

Parmigiane, R. Lot 375. 

Dearing, C. Lot 1,000. 

Kaerwer, R. Lot 450. 

Kindlund, G. Lot 300. 

Rogers, A. Lot 300. 

Tocci, M. Lot 200. 

Marsh, F. Lot 200. 

Jones, R. Lot 1,200. 

Nolan, J. Lot 800. 

DeChellis, L. Lot 800. 

Mulloy, L. Lot 800. 

Placido, G. Lot 800. 

Kibbe, J. Lot 800. 

Rogowski, A. Lot 800. 

Bridges, J. Lot 150. 

Kellar, J. Lot 200. 

Procaccini - Capone Lot 800. 

Baker, E. Lot 800. 

Hesnan, R. Lot 300. 

Moyninan, J. Lot 300. 

Ripley, R. Lot 800. 

Clarridge, F. Lot 800. 

Wilmarth, D. Lot 800. 

Laverty, H. Lot 150. 

219 

































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221 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL 

TOWN MEETING 

1987 



222 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WARRANT FOR ANNUAL 
TOWN MEETING 1987 



Norfolk, ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in 
Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, 
the thirtieth day of March, A.D., 1987 at 6:00 A.M., then and there to act 
on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1 . To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by 
ballot, viz: 

One Moderator for one year. 

One member of the Housing Authority for two years. 

One Treasurer, one Assessor, one Selectman, two members of the 
Board of Trustees of the Public Library, two members of the School 
Committee, three Park Commissioners, all for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing 
Authority for five years each. 



QUESTION OP PUBLIC POLICY 

Shall the town purchase additional group life and group accidental death and 
dismemberment insurance for employees in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter thirty-two B of the General Laws with no premium contribution by the 
town? 



YES 



_J NO J I 



A "Yes" vote will enable the town to negotiate with insurance providers for 
additional insurance under the group policy. Any additional premium will be 
paid by the employee. Presently the town offers $2,000 in group life and 
group accidental death and dismemberment insurance, 50$ payable by the town 
and 50% payable by the employee. 

The polls will be open at 6:00 A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-seventh day of April, A.D., 1987, commencing at 7:30 
P.M. the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
School gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

223 



ARTICLE 3« To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to "borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1 , 1987, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and 
to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17* 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all means 
in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that office. 

ARTICLE 5« To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Cemetery 
Commission to appoint one of its members as Cemetery Foreman and one of its 
members as Cemetery Laborer at the salary set out in the Personnel 
Administration Plan, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Cemetery Commission) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums 
as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the 
interest thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

Baumann, E. $ 1,200.00 

Priestly-Sarno 2,000.00 

Abrams, J. 150.00 

Chudzik, T. 400.00 

Byrnes, E. 800.00 

Ness, R. 251 .00 

Burr, H. 200.00 

Alasso, A. 400.00 

Ryan, J. 600.00 

Ours, F. 200.00 

DeSorgher, L. 300.00 

Morrissey, H. 800.00 

Jackson, ¥. 800.00 

Brewer, C. 1 ,200.00 

Germaine, J. 200.00 

Carpenter, E. 150.00 

LaFrance, B. 750.00 

Becker, R. 450.00 

Contieri, A. 600.00 

Bernardo, M. 1,200.00 

Walsh, W. 1 ,200.00 

D' Antonio, J. 800.00 

Clarkin, L. 600.00 

Strittmatter, L. 300.00 

Sullivan, E. 600.00 

Knowles, M. 200.00 

Smith, E. 400.00 

Sanders, D. 350.00 

Smith, G. 200.00 

Ross, A. 400.00 

Parmigiane, R. 375.00 

Dearing, C. 1 ,000.00 

Kaerwer, R. 450.00 

Kindlund, G. 300.00 

Rogers, A. 300.00 

Tocci, M. 200.00 



224 



Marsh, F. 200.00 
Jones, R. 1 ,200.00 

Nolan, J. 800.00 

DeChellis, L. 800.00 

Mulloy, L. 800.00 

Placido, G. 800.00 

Kibbe, J. 800.00 

Rogowski, A. 800.00 

Bridges, J. 150.00 

Kellar, J. 200.00 

Procaccini-Capone 800.00 

Baker, E. 800.00 

Hesnan, R. 300.00 

Moynihan, J. 300.00 

Ripley, R. 800.00 

Clarridge, F. 800.00 

Wilmarth, D. 800.00 

Laverty, H. 150.00 

(Cemetery Commission) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 140, Section 147A 
of the General Laws, providing for town regulation of dogs, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Clerk) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to sell or otherwise dispose of the 1950 85' Pirsch Aerial Ladder Truck, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

ARTICLE 9« To see if the Town will vote to accept an equal education 
opportunity grant for fiscal year 1987 in the amount of $69,293*00, under 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 70A, Section 5 as inserted by 
Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985. Said grant shall be expended by the 
Tri-County Regional School District Committee for direct service 
expenditures, or do or anything in relation thereto. 

(Tri-County Regional 
Vocational Technical School) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer and 
Collector to enter into compensating balance agreements during fiscal year 
1988 as permitted by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53F, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Treasurer and Collector) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to enter into a contract with the SES Millbury Company to receive 
certain waste materials from the Town at their SES Resource Recovery 
Facility in Millbury, Massachusetts for a term of 20 years, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



225 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article 
II, Section 8., paragraph 2. by deleting the present paragraph and inserting 
the following: 

"The Selectmen may also provide a transfer station for the 
collection of such deposits to be disposed of outside of the Town 
or otherwise by the Town or by private contractors. The Selectmen 
are authorized to set rates and charge residents, businesses, 
private contractors and others for the use of the Transfer Station 
and to make such regulations as they find necessary for the proper 
operation of the facilities." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 13» To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation 
of the following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Treasurer, 
Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, 
Collector of Taxes, Park and Recreation Commission, Planning Board, Housing 
Authority, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



226 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Administration Plan, effective July 1, 1987, to read as follows: 



Personnel 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 



SALARIED POSITIONS 



Police Department 



Minimum 



2nd Step 



Police Chief 


25,116 




Police Sergeant 


23,098 


24,028 


Police Officer 


18,137 


19,409 


Specialist Range 


350 




Dog Officer 


17,180 





3rd Step 



20,901 



Maximum 



33,423 
25,193 
22,289 
1 ,000 
18,723 



Police Officers designated as Detective, Prosecutor, or 
Photographer/Fingerprinter by the Police Chief shall receive additional 
compensation annually at a rate to be determined by the Police Chief within 
the above Specialist Range. 



TOWN MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 

Streets, Water and Sewer Department 
Superintendent of Public Works 

Fire Department 
Chief 

Executive Department 
Town Administrator 
Administrative Assistant 



Minimum 


Midpoint 


Maximum 


31,612 


39,516 


47,419 


30,106 


37,634 


45,161 


38,320 


48,031 


57,638 


23,894 


28,110 


32,327 



Library 
Director 



23,894 



28,110 



32,327 



Board of Health 
Detached Outreach Worker 



HOURLY POSITIONS 



18,403 



23,016 



Library 

Children's Librarian 

Reference Librarian 



7.37 
7.37 



9-20 
9-20 



10.08 
10.08 



227 



HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 



Grade Minimum Wage Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


1 3- 


55 4.85 


5.09 


5.36 


5.64 


5.95 


2 


5.09 


5.36 


5.64 


5.95 


6.25 


3 


5.36 


5-64 


5-95 


6.25 


6.60 


4 


5.64 


5-95 


6.25 


6.60 


6.93 


5 


5.95 


6.25 


6.60 


6.93 


7.29 


6 


6.25 


6.60 


6.93 


7.29 


7.68 


7 


6.60 


6.93 


7.29 


7.68 


8.08 


8 


6.93 


7.29 


7.68 


8.08 


8.50 


9 


7.29 


7.68 


8.08 


8.50 


8.97 


10 


7.68 


8.08 


8.50 


8.97 


9.43 


11 


8.08 


8.50 


8.97 


9.43 


9.95 


12 


8.50 


8.97 


9.43 


9.95 


10.45 


13 


8.97 


9.43 


9.95 


10.45 


11.01 


14 


9.43 


9.95 


10.45 


11.01 


11.58 


15 


9.95 


10.45 


11 .01 


11 .58 


12.20 


16 


10.45 


11.01 


11.58 


12.20 


12.84 


17 


11 .01 


11 .58 


12.20 


12.84 


13-50 



228 



GRADE 1 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 
GRADE 9 



Swimming Instructor 
Lifeguard Instructor 

$1 1 63 • minimum per season 
Library Aide 
Playground Counselor 
Lifeguard 

$969* minimum per season 
Intern/Trainee 
Laborer 

GRADE 2 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 3 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 4 

Clerk Typist 

Cemetery Foreman 

Mini-bus Driver, Council on Aging 

GRADE 5 

Library Sr. Aide 

Skilled Laborer 

Secretary 

Executive Director, Council on Aging 

GRADE 6 

Collector/Bookkeeper/Secretary 

GRADE 7 

Police Matron 
Skating -Supervisor 
Traffic Supervisor 

GRADE 8 

Presently no jobs. 



Senior Secretary 
Truck Driver 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Dispatcher 
Call Firefighters 

GRADE 10 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 11 

Light Equipment Operator 
Municipal Buildings Custodian 
Administrative Secretary 

GRADE 12 

Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator 
Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Groundskeeper 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator Repairman 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator-in-Charge 
Finance/Data Processing Supervisor 

GRADE 14 

Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control 

GRADE 15 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 16 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 17 

Street/Water/Sewer Foreman 
Wasterwater Treatment Plant 
Operator-in-Charge 



229 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Assistant Waterfront Director 

Deputy Collector 
Ambulance E.M.T. 
Assistant Dog Officer 

Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Youth Coordinator 

Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veterans' Agent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Assistant Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Assistant Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$947- per year 

$2,701 to $3,525. per year 

$168. to $231. per week 

$1 ,453' minimum per season 

Fee 

$1 1 .02 per hour 

$1 ,389. per year 



$1 ,436. per year 
$483* per year 
$365* per year 
$365* per year 

$3,053. per year 

$187. to $285. per week 

$206. to $270. per week 

$275. per year 

$663* per year 

$1 ,166. per year 

$12,764. to $21,764. per year 

$5.90 to $9.55 per hour 

$3,426. per year 

$13.65 per inspection 
Annual Minimum $2,643* 
Annual Minimum $353* 
Annual Minimum $729. 
Annual Minimum $132. 
Annual Minimum $2,158. 
Annual Minimum $494. 
Annual Minimum $1 ,201 
Annual Minimum $353« 
$13.65 per inspection 
$7.17 per hour 
$13.65 per inspection 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Personnel Board) 



230 



ARTICLE ^5• To see if the Town will vote to authorize and direct the 
Selectmen to petition the Legislature for a special act to allow the town to 
vote to remove the position of Police Chief from Civil Service, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan, Article XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS, by adding a 
Section I. Ambulance EMT Annual Service Stipend. 

"Each certified Ambulance EMT who fills more than thirty (30) 
shifts during the calendar year shall receive an additional 
stipend, payable by January 15 of each year provided the 
individual was on an active roster as of December 31 of the 
previous year, according to the following schedule: 

30-49 Shifts 50-69 Shifts 70 or More 

Less than 3 full 
years' service $100 $300 $500 

3 but less than 
6 years' service 200 400 600 

6 or more years' 
service 300 500 700 

"Compensation or reimbursement received from any Town Department 
for EMT training, certification or recertification will be offset 
against such stipend. 

"A year of service shall begin on the date on which the individual 
works one full shift to the anniversary date thereof. Each year 
thereafter will be cumulative for years of service purposes only 
if the individual works a minimum of 10 shifts for such year.", 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town 
Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses of the 
Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1987, or such other sums as the 
Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 



231 



ARTICLE 18. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate on the fiscal 
1988 tax levy and/or transfer from available funds for Capital Expenditures 
including the following: 



Department 

Board of Selectmen 

Civil Defense 

Elections & Registrations 

Fire Department 

Park & Recreation Commission 

Planning Board 
Police Department 



Item 

Town Hall Renovation 
Town Common Construction 

Building Acquisition 

Voting Booth Replacement 

Overhead Doors 
Chief's Car 

Reconstruction of Metacomet Tennis Courts 
Asbestos Removal at Pfaff Center 

Drainage Study- 



Public Works 



Traffic Light Update 
Police Cruisers (3) 
Ambulance Replacement 
Computer 

Resurface Subdivisions 
Lease/Purchase Compactor 
One Ton Park Truck 
New Pickup Truck - Water 
Two Sidewalk Plows 
Twelve Ton Roller 
Low-bed Trailer 
Lawn Mower 

Replacement Pickup Truck 
Six Wheel Truck 

Window Replacement 

Parking Lot 

Multi Field Upgrade 

Paved walkway to Memorial School 

Field Upgrading 

and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee be further 
authorized to contract with and otherwise treat with any federal and state 
agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any capital expenditures; and 
that the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee respectively be 
authorized to trade or sell toward part of the purchase price, the 
following: 

Trade: 1 1963 Bobcat Sidewalk Plow - Highway 

1 1980 GMC Dump Truck - Highway 

1 1972 Mack Dump Truck - Highway 

1 1981 Ford LTD - Fire 

2 1985 Ford Police Cruisers - Police 



School Department 



or do or act anything in relation thereto, 



(Capital Budget Committee) 



232 



ARTICLE 19. To see what action the Town will take on the following 
petition: 

"That the town of Medfield appropriate sufficient funds for the 
installation of a sidewalk on the North side of Adams Street, to 
run from the Dale Street School to the commercially zoned west 
section beginning at approximately 95 Adams Street.", 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 20. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate on 
the fiscal 1988 tax levy to be used in conjunction with and in addition to 
any funds allotted by the Commonwealth for the construction, reconstruction 
and improvement of roads under the provisions of Section 34, Chapter 90 of 
the General Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Ledgetree Road from Station 0+20.00 to Station 11.23+04 
Brastow Drive from Station 0+00 to Station 10+65*50 
Marsh Drive from Station 0+00 to Station 8+73.93 
Plympton Circle from Station 0+00 to Station 2+34.73 
Newell Drive from Station 0+00 to Station 4+24.84 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in 
the several Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, 
such rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements, as may be 
necessary to accomplish such purposes, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 22. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate for 
the cost of providing a motorcycle for the use of the Police Department, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize and direct the Board 
of Selectmen to petition the legislature for a special act authorizing the 
Town to pay a sum to Henry Marcel as compensation for loss of income from 
his regular employment because of incapacity due to injury sustained in the 
performance of his duty as a call fireman without fault of his own, said sum 
to be paid from the Fire Department budget, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



233 



ARTICLE 24. To see what sum of money the Town will appropriate for the 
purposes of Clause 32 of Section 5 of Chapter 40 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws for the payment of reasonable hospital, medical, surgical, 
nursing, pharmaceutical, prosthetic and related expenses incurred by any 
member of its fire fighting force or any member of its police force as the 
natural and proximate result of an accident occurring, or of undergoing a 
hazard peculiar to his employment, while acting in the performance and 
within the scope of his duty without fault of his own, as provided in 
Section 100 of Chapter 41 of the Massachusetts General Laws, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a 
sum of money to be appropriated to the 155-00 Insurance Account for the 
purpose of paying Medicare payments for town employees for fiscal 1987, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to transfer custody, and control 
of the Town owned land shown as lot 141 and lot 142 on Assessors Map 42 to 
the Board of Selectmen, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen and Home Ownership Committee) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, to sell the Town owned land shown as lot 141 and lot 142 on 
Assessors Map 42 for the sum of $1 .00 for moderate income housing and to 
enter into such contracts and other agreements as may be necessary, in their 
judgment, for the purposes of this article, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen and Home Ownership Committee) 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the official Zoning Map 
by changing from RS-Residential Suburban, to RU-Residential Urban, all of 
lot 141 and that portion of lot 142 presently in the RS district, as shown 
on Assessors 1 Map 42, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen and Home Ownership Committee) 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the official Zoning Map 
of the Town of Medfield so as to change the area hereinafter described and 
bounded from the zoning classification Residential Urban (RU) to the zoning 
classification Residential Suburban (RS) : 

All of the land included within a boundary commencing at a point 
marked by the intersection of Green Street and the "property line", as shown 
on the Zoning Map of Medfield to the northerly side of Summer Street, thence 
running along the northwesterly side of said Green Street, across North 
Street and continuing along the northwesterly side of Cottage Street to 
Frairy Street, thence turning and running northwesterly along the 
southwesterly property line parallel to Frairy Street, denoting the limits 
of the current RU District, as shown on the Zoning Map of Medfield, thence 
following the said RU District line along the northwesterly side of Dale 
Street, and then following said line as it turns parallel to North Street, 
as shown on said Zoning Map, thence turning and running easterly, as shown 



234 



on said Zoning Map along said line as it borders the lower portion of Pine 
Street and continuing along the northerly side of Summer Street, on the line 
denoted "property line" on the Zoning Map of Medfield, to the point of be- 
ginning. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw of the 
Town of Medfield by amending Section 5-4-1 .4 to delete PB, as it currently 
appears under the Column R-U thereof and substitute therefor SP. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to adopt as Article XI of the Town 
bylaws proposed regulations for underground storage of hazardous materials, 
the full text of which is available for examination at the Town Hall and the 
Public Library, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Hazardous Waste Committee) 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 
59 t Section 5, Clause Forty-first C of the Massachusetts General Laws as 
amended, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 
59, Section 5, Clause Seventeenth D of the Massachusetts General Laws, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
defray the cost of re-evaluation of all property in the Town as required by 
state law, to transfer the sum of $30,000. from the Stabilization Fund to 
meet a portion of the cost, to raise the balance of the cost on the 1988 
fiscal year tax levy and to authorize the Board of Assessors to enter into 
all contracts necessary for the purposes of this article, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 35- To see if the Town will vote to amend the bylaws by adding the 
following new Section to ARTICLE IV - Police Regulations: 

"Section 9(a) 

"No person shall drive a motorcycle or other vehicle on any public 
playing field or playground without permission. The fine for 
violation of this section shall be two hundred and fifty dollars 
($250.), " 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee and Selectmen) 



235 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Regulations Relative 
to Sewer Assessments by deleting Section 3« and substituting in place 
thereof the following language: 

"Assessments shall be apportioned 50% based on the uniform unit 
method as defined by the General Court." 

and by striking from Section 4«, the second sentence defining corner lot 
frontage; 

and by deleting from Section 6. the words "FRONTAGE AND", or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 40, Section 57 providing for the denial of licenses or 
permits, including renewals and transfer, issued by any board, officer or 
department for any person, corporation or business enterprise who has 
neglected or refused to pay any local taxes, fees, assessments, betterments 
or any other municipal charges, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Tax Collector) 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the bylaws by adding to 
Article III. TOWN OFFICERS a new Section 9(b) which shall read as follows: 

(1) The tax collector or other municipal official responsible 
for records of all municipal taxes, assessments, 
betterments and other municipal charges, hereinafter referred 
to as the tax collector, shall annually furnish to each 
department, board, commission or division, hereinafter 
referred to as the licensing authority, that issues licenses 
or permits including renewals and transfers, a list of any 
person, corporation, or business enterprise, hereinafter 
referred to as the party, that has neglected or refused to pay 
any local taxes, fees, assessments, betterments or other 
municipal charges for not less than a twelve month period, and 
that such party has not filed in good faith a pending 
application for an abatement of such tax or pending petition 
before the appellate tax board. 

(2) The licensing authority may deny, revoke or suspend any 
license or permit, including renewals and transfers of any 
party whose name appears on said list furnished to the 
licensing authority from the tax collector; provided, however, 
that written notice is given to the party and the tax 
collector, as required by applicable provisions of law, and 
the party is given a hearing, to be held not earlier than 
fourteen days after said notice. Said list shall be prima 
facie evidence for denial, revocation or suspension of said 
license or permit to any party. The tax collector shall have 
the right to intervene in any hearing conducted with respect 
to such license denial, revocation or suspension. Any 
findings made by the licensing authority with respect to such 
license denial, revocation or suspension shall be made only 
for the purposes of such proceeding and shall not be relevant 
to or introduced in any other proceeding at law, except for 



236 



any appeal from such license denial, revocation or suspension. 
Any license or permit denied, suspended or revoked under this 
section shall not be reissued or renewed until the license 
authority receives a certificate issued by the tax collector 
that the party is in good standing with respect to any and all 
local taxes, fees, assessments, betterments or other municipal 
charges, payable to the municipality as the date of issuance 
of said certificate. 

(3) Any party shall be given an opportunity to enter into a 
payment agreement, thereby allowing the licensing authority 
to issue a certificate indicating said limitations to the 
license or permit and the validity of said license shall be 
conditioned upon the satisfactory compliance with said 
agreement. Failure to comply with said agreement shall be 
grounds for the suspension or revocation of said license or 
permit; provided, however, that the holder be given notice and 
a hearing as required by applicable provisions of law. 

(4) The board of selectmen may waive such denial, suspension 

or revocation if it finds there is no direct or 
indirect business interest by the property owner, its officers 
or stockholders, if any, or members of his immediate family, 
as defined in section one of chapter two hundred and 
sixty-eight in the business or activity conducted in or on 
said property. 

This section shall not apply to the following licenses and 
permits: open burning under M.G.L. section thirteen of chapter 
forty-eight; bicycle permits under M.G.L. section eleven A of 
chapter eighty-five; sales of articles for charitable purposes 
under M.G.L. section thirty-three of chapter one hundred and 
one; children work permits under M.G.L. section sixty-nine of 
chapter one hundred and forty-nine; clubs, associations 
dispensing food or beverage licenses under M.G.L. section 
twenty-one E of chapter one hundred and forty; dog licenses 
under M.G.L. section one hundred and thirty-seven of chapter 
one hundred and forty; fishing, hunting, trapping license 
under M.G.L. section twelve of chapter one hundred and 
thirty-one; marriage licenses under M.G.L. section 
twenty-eight of chapter two hundred and seven and theatrical 
events, public exhibition permits under M.G.L. section one 
hundred and eighty-one of chapter one hundred and forty. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Tax Collector) 

ARTICLE 39* To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purposes of 
designing and constructing street sewers within the Town of Medfield and to 
authorize the Water & Sewerage Board to enter into contracts with the State 
and Federal government for this purpose, and to accept Federal and State 
grants, or reimbursements or take any other action relating thereto, and 
that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to acquire by purchase, taking by 
eminent domain or otherwise such rights, titles, permits and easements as 
are necessary; and that to accomplish said purposes, that the Board of 
Selectmen be authorized to enter into contracts with the State and Federal 



237 



governments and to accept any applicable Federal and State grants or 
reimbursements; and that the Water & Sewerage Board be authorized to assess 
a portion of the costs of said sewers in accordance with the bylaws of the 
Town of Medfield and in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 83 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water & Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the town bylaws by adding 
an Article providing for the placing of all electrical and telephone 
services in new construction in underground conduit as follows: 

ARTICLE XI. UNDERGROUND UTILITY INSTALLATIONS 

Section 1 . Material 

All residential, commercial and industrial, electrical 
and telephone services from the public utility supply 
point or handhole to the meter enclosure of the building 
shall be installed underground within a rigid metal 
galvanized conduit, approved by Underwriters 
Laboratories, Inc., or nonmetallic conduit not smaller 
than schedule 40 P.V.C. so approved, suitable for 
underground installation, having a minimum inside 
diameter of at least two inches (2") or such larger 
diameter as may be necessary for the service intended. 

Section 2. Installation 

The conduit shall have all necessary sweep bends to make 
it one continuous unit free from blockages. It shall be 
buried to a depth of not less than twenty-four inches 
(24") below the surface of the ground and covered with 
at least four inches (4") of sand. If there is less 
than twenty- four inches (24") of cover over the conduit, 
it shall be encased in at least two inches (2") of 
concrete. Prior to backfilling, the completed 
installation shall be inspected and approved by the Town 
of Medfield wiring inspector. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by 
deleting section 8.3 Parking and Loading Space Standards as it presently 
reads and substituting the following: 

8.3.1 All parking or loading areas (see definition 2.1) 
are subject to the following: 

8.3.1 «a) There shall be no vehicle parking or loading 

spaces within 5 feet of any front, side or rear 
lot line. 

8.3.1 .b) There shall be no vehicle repair facilities within 
parking areas. 

8.3*1 .c) There shall be no storage of material or equipment 
within parking areas. 

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8.3.1 *d) Parking shall not be located within the required 
front yard area in any "R" district. However, 
access driveways may be located within the re- 
quired front yard area. 

8.3*1 *e) Parking and loading spaces shall be so arranged as 
not to permit backing of automobiles onto any 
street. 

8.3*1 »f) The area and access driveways in any "B", "B-I" 

and "I-E" zoning districts and "R-U" lots 
containing three or more units shall be surfaced 
with bituminous asphalt, concrete, brick, 
cobblestones or pavers and shall be constructed so 
that there shall be no puddling or surface water. 

8.3*2 All parking or loading areas containing over five spaces, 

including automobile service and drive-in establishments, 
shall be contained within structures, or subject to the 
following additional requirements: 

8. 3*2. a) The area shall be effectively screened on each 

side which adjoins or faces the side or rear lot 
line of a lot situated in any "R" District. The 
screening shall consist of that required for 
buffers as specified in Section 6, paragraphs 
6.2.9 and 6.2.10. The screening shall be set back 
from each street no more than the main building 
wall minimum setback. 

8.3*2.b) A substantial bumper of masonry, steel, heavy 

timber or concrete curb stop shall be placed at 
the edge of surfaced areas except driveways in 
order to protect abutting structures, properties 
and sidewalks. 

8.3*2.c) Any fixture used to illuminate a parking or 

loading area shall be so arranged as to direct the 
light away from the street and away from adjoining 
premises used for residential purposes. 

8.3*2.d) Any repair or service facility for use by vehicles 
such as gas, oil or water shall be at least 25 
feet from any lot line. 

8.3*2.e) No portion of any entrance or exit driveway to the 
area shall be closer than 150 feet to the 
centerline of an intersecting street. No more 
than two driveways shall serve any one area. 

8.3*2.f) For any site having one means of access or egress, 
the width of the driveway shall not be less than 
24 feet. For any site having a separate entrance 
or exit, the driveway shall not exceed 20 feet in 
width, except for a suitable curvature at the 
entrance. 



239 



8.3«2.g) Each parking space shall be marked with a 

three-inch (3") wide (minimum) solid painted line 
on each side and along the full depth. Paint 
shall be white or yellow Traffic Paint as 
specified for pavement markings in Standard 
Specifications for Highways and Bridges for the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public 
Works. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw, Section 
6.3 TABLE OF HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS , by adding a District A and for 
the requirements in District A add, "(see Section 5«5)"> or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 43* To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaws, 
Section 6.2 TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS NOTES , 6.2.10 by changing the number 
"3" to the number "6" so that the third sentence shall read, in part, 
"Individual bushes or trees shall be planted not more than 6 feet on 
centers, ...", or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaws, 
Section 6.3 TABLE OF HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS by changing the wording as 
follows: 

District R-U; "Maximum Height" from 45 (ft.) to 35 (ft.); 
permitted height (stories) from "3 and 4*" to "2-1/2"; maximum 
floor area ratio including accessory buildings from "0.50" to 
"0.35" and by deleting "*See Section 6.3.4" and by deleting 
Section 6.3«4« , 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of conducting a Hazardous Household Waste Collection 
day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the 
reduction of the Tax Rate for Fiscal 1988, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days 
at least before the time of holding said meeting. 



240 



HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make due return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting, aforesaid. 
Given under our hands this tenth day of March in the year of our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and Eighty-seven. 

Robert J. Larkin 
William F. Nourse 
Ann B. Thompson 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and 
for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of the same at five public 
places seven days before the date of the meeting, as within directed. 



Constable of Medfield 



Date 



241 



242 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers Elected 6 

APPOINTMENTS BY: 

Board of Selectmen 8 

Assessors 18 

Fire Chief 19 

Board of Health 19 

Planning Board 20 

Moderator 19 

Tax Collector 18 

Town Accountant 18 

Town Clerk 18 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Aging, Council on , . 75 

Ambulance Department 50 

Animal Control 52 

Animal Inspector ' 54 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 67 

Architectural Barriers Committee .80 

Assessors, Board of 55 

Cable T.V. Committee 28 

Cemetery Commissioners 94 

Civil Defense Department 51 

Conservation Commission 81 

Fire Department 40 

Hazardous Waste Committee 36 

Health, Board of ... . 83 

Historical Commission 73 

Housing Authority 79 

Inspection Department 95 

Library Trustees 69 

Memorial Public Library .71 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 60 

Park and Recreation Commission 90 

Planning Board 61 

Police Department 44 

Prison Project 39 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 68 

Selectmen, Board of 22 

Sign Advisory Board 66 

Streets, Water and Sewer 31 

Tree and Insect Pest Control 59 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 98 

Veterans' Services 89 

Reuse of 458 Main Street 35 

Water and Sewer Department 57 



243 



Page 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Assistant Superintendent for Business Affairs 118 

Adult Education 137 

Amos Clark Kingsbury School 120 

Athletic Director 135 

Medfield Middle School 127 

Ralph Wheelock School 129 

Graduation Exercises, High School 122 

Pupil Services Department 131 

School Committee 103 

School Lunch Program 138 

Superintendent of Schools 105 

Teachers' Directory 108 

Tri-Valley Collaborative 133 

Dale Street School 127 

TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS: 

Births ..... 141 

Marriages 146 

Deaths 151 

TOWN MEETING AND ELECTIONS: 

Annual Town Election, March 31, 1986 155 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting, April 28, 1986 . . . 157 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 1987 222 

State Primary, September 16, 1986 196 

State Election, November 4, 1986 202 

Special Town Meeting, January 13, 1987 152 

FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors' Report , 210 

Contracts for Professional Services 220 

Perpetual Care 219 

Tax Collector 211 

Town Accountant 214 

Treasurer ; 212 

Water and Sewer 218 



244